Asian Longhorned Beetle

Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) Confirmed in South Carolina

Clemson University's Department of Plant Industry (DPI) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) announced today that Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) has been confirmed in South Carolina. This the latest ALB infestation to be found in North America and emphasizes the need to remain vigilant for the non-native tree killer.
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Authors
Joe Boggs
Amy Stone

Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) Update: A FREE Zoom Webinar

March Madness was canceled, but OSU Extension has stepped up with "Agriculture and Natural Resource (ANR) Madness." These are a series of online educational events you can tap into and enjoy – free of charge - in the privacy of your own home. There's no need to distance yourself from educational opportunities as you social distance.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Emerald Ash Borer University (EABU) - Upcoming Sessions

Emerald Ash Borer University (EABU) was created to be able share programming on the EAB, and other invasive pests, virtually, before it was the in-thing! While you are receiving lots of information about programs and presentations being offered virtually in response to the stay-at-home order, we wanted to remind you of the sessions EABU has on tap in the next couple months. Additionally, the sessions that have been offered in the past have been recorded and can be viewed at your convenience. 
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Authors
Amy Stone

Beetles Emerge from Firewood

I received an e-mail message from a homeowner asking for an ID of large beetles flying around their home. An attached image revealed the culprit to be painted hickory borers. This and other wood-boring beetles can emerge from firewood stored in or around homes to the surprise and consternation of homeowners.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

The National Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) Eradication Program Scores a "Win"

Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) is potentially the most devastating non-native pest to have ever arrived in North America. The beetle kills trees belonging to 12 genera in 9 plant families. This includes all native maples, a preferred host. The ripple effect across many forest ecosystems also means the potential loss of plant and animal species dependent upon those ecosystems.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Check Trees for ALB

August is the height of summer, and it is also the best time to spot the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) as it starts to emerge from trees. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is asking the public to take five minutes to step outside and report any signs of this invasive pest. Checking trees for the beetle will help residents protect their own trees and better direct USDA’s efforts to eradicate this beetle from the United States.
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) Cooperative Eradication Program in Ohio Scores Another "Win"

Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) is potentially the most devastating non-native pest to have ever arrived in North America. The beetle kills trees belonging to 12 genera in 9 plant families. This includes all native maples, a preferred host. Successful eradication is essential to avoiding a catastrophic loss of trees on a scale never before seen in the U.S.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs