Periodical Cicada

Tips on Oak Tips

Late-season defoliation of established deciduous trees is not usually of great concern. There is little impact on overall tree health because trees have produced and stored enough carbohydrates to support leaf production next spring. Indeed, we’re close to the time of the year when deciduous trees drop their leaves anyway.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Periodical Cicada Damage Look-A-Like

Tip dieback on oaks that is a look-a-like for periodical cicada oviposition damage is appearing outside of the areas in Ohio where Brood X (10) of the 17-year periodical cicadas appeared (wreaked havoc?) earlier this season. The damage is being caused by a very small beetle belonging to the genus, Agrilus (family Buprestidae). We’re not certain of the beetle's exact identity, so we’re calling it the “Agrilus Oak Twig Pruner.”
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Authors
Joe Boggs
Dave Shetlar

Periodical Update: Cicada Observations and Educational Opportunities

The anticipated magical appearance of Brood X (10) of the 17-year periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) is getting closer with each day. On one hand, the cicadas are providing clear evidence they are nearly reading take the stage en masse. On the other hand, progress has slowed to glacial speed owing to continual dips in springtime temperatures.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Early-Bird Periodical Cicadas

Periodical Cicadas (Magicicada spp.) take either 17 or 13 years to complete their development and emerge from the soil en masse as different "broods" in the spring. The only periodical cicada brood that's emerging this spring is Brood IX (Nine) in North Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Periodical Cicada: Rounds 1 and 2

Brood VIII (Eight) of the 17-year periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) have made their presence known in parts of northeastern Ohio, western Pennsylvania, and the northern panhandle of West Virginia. As with past brood emergences, the overall geographical distribution is spotty; however, there are localized pockets with heavy cicada activity.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Please Report Early-Bird Periodical Cicadas

Periodical Cicadas (Magicicada spp.) take either 17 or 13 years to complete their development and emerge from the soil en masse as different "broods" in the spring. The only periodical cicada brood that's forecast to emerge this year is Brood VI. However, there is a prediction that we will see an "early emergence" of some members of Brood X this spring even though adults of this brood are not expected to emerge full-force until 2021.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Periodical Cicada "Flagging:" Leaves at Tips of Branches are Turning Brown

Round 1 of the Periodical Cicada:

The emergence of Brood V of the 17-year periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) lived up to all expectations within the "cicada zone" in eastern Ohio, parts of West Virginia, and a very small part of southwest Pennsylvania.  Adults emerged in huge numbers, they climbed trees or flew to new trees, males serenaded cicada females with cacophonous songs only appreciated by the females, and mated females inserted eggs into stems.  The cicada adults are now dead and gone.

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Authors
Joe Boggs