Cydalima perspectalis

Box Tree Moth (BTM) Update #1

Box tree moth (BTM) caterpillars in southwest Ohio have awakened from their winter slumber meaning Ohio’s BTM hunting season is now open. There is no bag limit. This means it's time to take a close look at boxwoods to find, report, and manage BTM.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Amy Stone

Box Tree (Boxwood) Moth: New Detection, What to Look For, and Management

Box Tree Moth (BTM) is a non-native pest of boxwoods. It was first confirmed in Ohio by the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) in late June. Yesterday, the ODA announced that a BTM sighting has been confirmed in Montgomery County (Dayton Area). Coupled with the earlier detection in southwest Ohio, the two BTM sites are the southernmost in North America.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

What to Look for with Box Tree (Boxwood) Moth

The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) announced this past week that Box Tree Moth (BTM) (Cydalima perspectalis, family Crambidae) had been confirmed in Hamilton and Clermont counties in southwest Ohio. The location is near where the two counties meet Warren and Butler counties. It’s the first time this non-native boxwood (Buxus spp.) defoliator has been found in Ohio.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Ashley Kulhanek
Amy Stone

Box Tree (Boxwood) Moth Confirmed in Southwest Ohio

The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) has announced that the Box Tree Moth (BTM) (Cydalima perspectalis (family Crambidae) has been confirmed in southwest Ohio near the borders of Hamilton and Clermont Counties. This is the first time this non-native pest of boxwoods (Buxus spp.) has been confirmed in Ohio.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Amy Stone
Ashley Kulhanek

Box Tree Moth Alert

Boxwoods (Buxus spp.) are some of the most common plants found in Ohio landscapes and they remain a mainstay of our nursery industry. Box Tree Moth (Cydalima perspectalis) caterpillars defoliate boxwoods and will strip bark once they run out of leaves to eat. The moth has multiple generations per year, depending on geographical locations, and sustained high populations are capable of killing boxwoods.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs