bagworm

Bagworms Reveal Themselves! boggs.47@osu.edu Tue, 07/30/2019 - 08:34
This is the time of the year when Common Bagworms come into clear focus owing to their size and noticeable damage. Overwintered eggs hatched in southwest Ohio in early June (see "Be Alert to Bagworms!" posted on June 6). However, it's amazing how well these native moth caterpillars crawl below our radar until their burgeoning appetites finally gives them away.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Be Alert to Bagworms! boggs.47@osu.edu Thu, 06/06/2019 - 11:14
Overwintered common bagworm eggs are hatching in southwest Ohio. The 1st instar caterpillars are very small with their bags measuring around 1/8" in length.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Bagworms are Wrapping Up

Most of the Common Bagworms I looked at yesterday in southern Ohio and central Indiana had initiated their annual "tie-off" in preparation for pupation. Bags are tightly closed and tied with silk to a twig or other anchorage point. This means the damage caused by these caterpillars wrapped in silk bags festooned with host plant debris is drawing to a close.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Sneaky Bagworms

I'm not yet saying this is going to be a banner season for Common Bagworms. However, I'm commonly finding bagworms in southwest Ohio without much effort. I've not heard reports from elsewhere in the state
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Bagworm Alert! boggs.47@osu.edu Wed, 05/30/2018 - 11:53
Overwintered Common Bagworm eggs are hatching in southwest Ohio. The tiny 1st instar bags are constructed with pieces of tan to reddish-brown sawdust-like frass (excrement) stuck to the outside of silk and look like "dunce caps."
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Bagworms Tie One On. young.2 Thu, 09/01/2016 - 10:40
As summer draws to an end, many insects and mites approach the end of their seasonal activities as well. Curtis Young reports that the majority of common bagworms (Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis) have finished their destructive feeding as caterpillars in their individual bags, have tied their bags to their host plant, and are pupating (pupa=3rd stage of their life cycle).
Published on
Authors
Curtis E. Young

The Ins and Outs of Bagworms

  The title of this bygl-alert is actually a bit disingenuous, since Dave Shetlar, Joe Boggs, and Curtis Young, entomologists all, are better equipped on the ins and outs of Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis, the common bagworm, compared to me, a plant pathologist. The Latin binomial itself makes me a bit crazy, which I guess makes sense, since the family (group of related genera) for the common bagworm is – Psychidae. The actual ins and outs in this case actually refers to what my wife and I saw at a central Pennsylvania rest area this weekend.  There were numerous...

Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield

Bagworms on Deciduous Trees

Common bagworm (Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis) populations crashed a few years ago in Ohio with this general defoliator becoming a rare find.  This changed last season with significant localized populations observed in many areas of the state and the trend appears to be continuing this season.  I've recently found several heavy infestations in southern Ohio with significant damage now becoming very evident.

 

It is a common misconception that bagworms only eat evergreens; however, the caterpillars can feed on over 130 different species of plants including a wide...

Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Overwintered Bagworm Eggs Have Hatched and Caterpillars Are Feeding

Overwintered common bagworm (Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis) eggs have hatched in southwest Ohio and 1st instar caterpillars have settled to feed and construct their characteristic sac-like bags.  A percentage of the tiny 1st instar caterpillars produce a strand of silk upon hatching to catch the wind and "balloon" to new locations.  This behavior is one of the reasons bagworms often appear on hosts that were not infested last season.

...
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs