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A Real Sweet Dilemma

I was asked to help a vegetable grower figure out what was going on with something wreaking havoc and eating his ripening sweet corn.  Typically, when someone mentions sweet corn and problems, the first demon that comes to mind are those little masked, sweet-toothed bandits, known as raccoons!   When I arrived out in the field, I was surprised to see the corn stalks standing tall in nice rows.  The masked marauders climb up the cornstalk to the get to the ripest, uppermost ear of corn; consequently, the corn stalks are most often snapped off or pushed over down to the...

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Authors
Erik Draper

Blister Beetles Wreaking Havoc on Tomatoes

I received two e-mails over the weekend from backyard gardeners in southwest Ohio with pictures showing Black Blister Beetles swarming over tomato plants. Black blister beetles as well as Margined Blister Beetles are the two most common species found in Ohio. Both beetles are capable of showing-up in large numbers to feed on the leaves and flowers of a wide range of perennials and annuals including vegetable plants.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

A Blooming Bias

In the world of plants, most often our attention focuses on bloom color, size and timing of when blooms will make an impact in our landscape.  Blooms are nice as a moving focal point during the growing season, but people become a little upset when plants don’t do what they are supposed to and only when they are supposed to do it.  This is the time of year that concerned citizens call into the office wondering whether or not their magnolias or rhododendrons are going to die.  When asked why they think that the plants are going to die, the response is always the same, “...

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Authors
Erik Draper

Annual of the Week - Dahlia

Dahlias can be a nice annual addition into Ohio gardens. Although a perennial in its native range in Mexico and Central America, there are consider annuals in Ohio. With a little extra work the tubers can be lift in the fall, stored over the winter, and planted the following spring. 
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Authors
Amy Stone

Marestail (Horseweed)

Marestail, which is also known as "Canadian horseweed," or just "horseweed," has moved from field crops to become a plague in landscapes and nurseries. The main reason is that certain biotypes are resistant to glyphosate (e.g. Roundup) as well as a number of other agricultural herbicides. In fact, this native North America plant has become such a problem in Ohio it has been added to the state's noxious weeds list.
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Authors
Joe Boggs