Coneflower Conundrums

Coneflowers (Echinacea spp., family Asteraceae) have long been a popular perennial favored for use in naturalized areas and mass plantings in landscapes because of their attractiveness to pollinators of all sorts. However, coneflowers may suffer from two problems that will only get worse next season unless they are properly managed.
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Authors
Joe Boggs
Dave Shetlar

Creeping Slime Molds

Last week, Pat Migliozzi (State Service Forester [extraordinaire], Ohio Department of Natural Resources) and I looked at an oak tree showing a most unusual symptom. The base of the tree looked like it had been dipped in white paint.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Itchy Alert

Reports are coming from Maryland about people being bitten by a tiny mite that has been associated with the Brood X periodical cicada emergence. The culprit is a non-native “itch mite,” Pyemotes herfsi. Bites from the mite produce small, circular, rosy-red, pruritic (itchy skin) rashes and the discomfort may last for several days. Thus far, there have been no reports from anywhere in Ohio.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

White Masses on the Stems of Redbuds, Wafer-Ash, and Other Trees

During yesterday’s Greater Cincinnati BYGLive! Virtual Diagnostic Walk-About, Dave Shetlar (Professor Emeritus, OSU Entomology) showed pictures he’d taken late last week in central Ohio of snowy-white masses on the stems of redbuds (Cercis canadensis). The agglomerations could easily be mistaken for mealybugs, felt scales, or soft scales, particularly cottony scales.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Do Aphids Really Spoil the Monarch’s Party?

Oleander aphids (Aphis nerii) are commonly viewed with disdain by devotees of monarchs (Danaus plexippus). This is the time of the season when we see hordes of the non-native yellow aphids on common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) plants that are "reserved" for monarchs. Of course, it shows that Nature takes no restaurant reservations, even for royalty.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Spotted Lanternfly Update, 07.30.2021

Last week, Indiana announced that the spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) was detected in Switzerland County. And earlier this week, the information was shared via a BYGL Alert (https://bygl.osu.edu/node/1832). Cornell University's Integrated Pest Management Program website has updated a SLF map included below that gives the big picture of where SLF is known to be in North America. 
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Authors
Amy Stone