"Concrete Mites" Are Out: Look Before You Sit!

So-called "concrete mites" are making their annual appearance in southwest Ohio. These tiny, fast-moving bright red mites scurry around on sunny surfaces such as on picnic tables, patios, sidewalks, concrete retaining walls, and on the outside walls of homes and buildings. They are called concrete mites owing to the locations where they tend to congregate.
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Authors
Joe Boggs
Aphid Galls Rising on Elms boggs.47@osu.edu Thu, 05/28/2020 - 18:56
The leaves of native elms can look a bit bedraggled at this time of the year owing to the rise of pouch-like elm sack galls and the descriptively named elm cockscomb galls. Fortunately, neither of these aphid galls produce significant injury to the overall health of their elm tree host. Unfortunately, these odd-looking plant structures can spoil the aesthetics of their deep green elm leaf platforms.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Yeasty Beasties, Slim Flux, and Other Natural Wonders

I came across a colorful agglomeration of slimy growth on a cut stem of wild grape (Vitis spp.) during a recent walk in a local park. With a little imagination, the shimmering mass took the form of a strange sea monster with a dripping nose, perhaps because of our high pollen count. Of course, I had a little fun with enhancing the effect.
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Joe Boggs

Friday, June 5 - Virtual Escape to the Forest - Forest Insects: Native and Non-Native

 

The OSU's Ohio Woodland Stewards Program in the School of Environment and Natural Resources (SENR) is offering online Friday's in the Forest during this pandemic.

 

Next Friday you can join OSU’s Amy Stone and Joe Boggs as we look at some native forest insects and some non-native forest insects.  Insects that create ‘tents’, insects that dance, along with insects that create galls and insects that suck sap – something for everyone.  The virtual session will be offered on Friday, June 5, from 10:00 am - 12:00 pm. 

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Amy Stone
Joe Boggs
Kathy Smith

Nostoc commune: From "The Blob" to Crusty Black Stuff

Recent heavy rainfall across Ohio has been very beneficial to the cyanobacterium, Nostoc commune (NC). Of course, that's not the name that most Ohioans will use to refer to this ancient organism. E-mails and phone calls to horticulture professionals may describe it as rubbery yellowish-green or bluish-black growth rising from the soil; some may just describe it as "the blob."
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Beautiful Oak Flowers

Flowers! That is one of many things horticulturalists think of when we think spring. We think of the beautiful flowers of things like Malus, Forsythia, Viburnum, and Quercus. I know, you might be asking, “Quercus, really?” Indeed oaks. Oaks have spectacular flowers! These often-overlooked flowers and quite intricate and showy in their own right...

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Authors
Paul Snyder