Turfgrass Times, 06.15.2021

Tune and watch the latest Turfgrass Times from the OSU Turf Team. This week's video includes updates from Todd Hicks, Dr. Pamela Sherratt, Dr. Dave Gardner, and Dr. Ed Nangle. Updates include: diseases, weather, weeds, overseeding and more. 
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Authors
Amy Stone

Maple Leaf Blister

Last month, I received an email message from a Lucas County resident that was noticing leaf drop on some maples in her neighborhood. Of course, the diagnostic process immediately begins, and my mind automatically goes to the OSU FactSheet, and I start going through the series of questions. If you aren't familiar with the FactSheet, or need a refresher, this resource is laid out in a order that takes you through the diagnostic process. 
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Authors
Amy Stone

Turfgrass Times, 06.04.2021

Last Friday, members of the OSU Turfgrass Team gathered to share their expertise in the latest Turfgrass Times You Tube video. Reports from Dr. David Gardner, Dr. David Shetlar (aka the BugDoc), and Dr. Ed Nangle. Dr. Gardner shared a weed update, including management options, and made mention of red thread. Dr. Shetlar discussed insects including: cicadas, May / June beetles, white grubs, and adult craneflies. Dr. Nangle talked about the weather, soil temperatures and mentioned some up coming educational opportunities. 
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Authors
Amy Stone

Holey Oak Leaves

The oak shothole leafminer is a small fly belonging to the family Agromyzidae; the leaf miner flies. The leafminer produces four progressive symptoms: small pinprick-like holes, larger holes, dark brown "blotch mines," and ragged-looking leaves with missing pieces.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Box Tree Moth Alert

Boxwoods (Buxus spp.) are some of the most common plants found in Ohio landscapes and they remain a mainstay of our nursery industry. Box Tree Moth (Cydalima perspectalis) caterpillars defoliate boxwoods and will strip bark once they run out of leaves to eat. The moth has multiple generations per year, depending on geographical locations, and sustained high populations are capable of killing boxwoods.
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Authors
Joe Boggs