Scouting and Spraying for Spotted Lanternfly in late June 2022

Multiple partners from Ohio Department of Agriculture, United States Department of Agriculture-Division of Forestry, The Ohio State University, Cleveland Metroparks, and USDA – APHIS (Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service) assemble to scout for Spotted Lanternfly in potentially infested areas in and around Cleveland – Cuyahoga County including Mill Creek Metropark, Paramelt, and St Joseph Cemetery. Additionally, and area in Amherst located in Lorain County was inspected and sprayed.
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Authors
Thomas deHaas

Japanese Beetles are Becoming Evident

Reports of noticeable numbers of Japanese Beetles (Popillia japonica) were on the rise last week in Ohio. Thus far, population distribution is highly localized. This population pattern has been typical for Japanese beetles in Ohio for many years. A short drive can take you from a location with high numbers to another location with virtually no beetles.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

“Pine Cones” Rise on Willows

Willow Pinecone Galls, with their faux seed scales, bear a striking resemblance to pine cones, particularly when the galls darken during the winter. Of course, pine cones don’t occur on angiosperms, only on gymnosperms. And, a close examination will expose the pine cone ruse with the galls covered in fine hairs; pine cones aren’t hairy.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Coneflower Rosette Mite: Tufted Seed Heads are on the Rise

Tufted flower parts that rise rosette-like from coneflower cones are symptoms of an eriophyid mite (family Eriophyidae) that has yet to be taxonomically categorized, so it has no scientific name or approved common name. However, the mite is generally referred to as the Coneflower Rosette Mite based on the damage that it causes to coneflowers.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

A Kissing Bug in Ohio: Don’t Panic!

This past week, the Kissing Bug Triatoma sanguisuga was identified from images sent to OSU Entomology from a resident in Warren County and to OSU Extension, Butler County, from a resident in that county. This kissing bug was given the approved common name of Bloodsucking Conenose by the Entomological Society of America (ESA).
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Why Are My Apples Falling Off?

This is the time of year that is both disappointing and exhilarating for any fruit grower because of the phenomenon called “June drop”.  It is disappointing because of what you thought would be your best apple crop and your dreams of apple crisps and pies galore… suddenly begins to drop off the tree.  But it’s okay because as a fruit grower, you know that most fruit trees will produce many more blooms than are actually needed by the tree to produce a full fruit load.

 

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Authors
Erik Draper