Turfgrass Times, 05.28.2021

This week's OSU Turfgrass Times includes reports from Dr. Dave Gardner, Dr. Dave Shetlar (aka BugDoc) and Dr. Ed Nangle. Report highlights include a timely weed update including: oxalis, speedwell, crabgrass, and rough bluegrass. Insects on the radar are: periodical cicada, annual bluegrass weevils, bluegrass billbug, hairy chinch bug, and white grubs. 
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Authors
Amy Stone

Plant of the Week - White Fringe Tree

Each spring I am mesmerized by the white blooms of the white fringetree (Chionanthus virginicus) outside my office at the Toledo Botanical Garden. This large shrub, or small tree, has a spreading habit. The plant is currently in its flowering glory in NW Ohio, capturing the attention of the Garden visitors wondering what it is. The white, slightly fragrant flowers are born in panicles that hang downward with a very soft and delicant appearance to them. 
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Authors
Amy Stone

An Oak-Apple Gall Ex Expert

An overly generous conference moderator once introduced a talk I was about to give titled, “Tree Galls: A Management Conundrum,” as being presented by a “gall expert.” I looked around to see if they’d made a last-minute speaker substitution.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Sticky Oaks

I recently came across a burr oak (Quercus macrocarpa) with leaves covered in clear, sticky honeydew. I could also feel fine droplets raining down as I stood beneath the canopy. Indeed, my camera lens collected so many tiny droplets I had to retreat to my car to clean it before taking more pictures.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Dripping Calico Scale

Calico scale (Eulecanium cerasorum) is notorious for raining large quantities of sweet sticky honeydew onto the leaves and stems of its host tree as well as onto understory plants, sidewalks, parked cars, hapless gardeners, etc. A dingy patina is added when the honeydew becomes colonized by black sooty molds.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Poison Hemlock and Wild Parsnip are Bolting and Blooming

Poison hemlock (Conium maculatum) is one of the deadliest plants in North America. Wild parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) sap can produce severe, painful skin blistering. Both are commonly found growing together in Ohio and both are beginning to bloom meaning the clock is quickly winding down for controlling these non-native nasties.
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Authors
Joe Boggs