Display Articles by Date Range

example: 1/1/2016 and 12/31/2016

Annual Maple Leaf-Drop

Finding large numbers of green leaves littering the ground beneath maple trees wouldn't be a surprise given the recent high winds and heavy rains over much of Ohio. However, you should take a second look at this time of the year for short petioles on the shed leaves and broken petioles remaining attached to the tree. Both are tell-tale symptoms of the maple petiole borer.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Be Alert for "Mud Chimneys"

The rise of "mud chimneys" produced by burrowing crayfish has long been one of my favorite harbingers of spring. These unusual mud structures are often described as looking like chimneys because of their cylindrical shape and large, round hole in the center. No other animal produces such unique mud structures in Ohio.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Wilted, Rolled, and Mined Buckeye Leaves boggs.47 Mon, 05/20/2019 - 11:18
Buckeye and horsechestnut tree canopies tend to be remarkably free of insect pest damage except for the depredations of some general defoliators. However, if you're cruising Ohio woodlands this spring, you may run across three types of leaf damage. None of the damage appears to cause serious harm to overall tree health, but the symptoms can be obvious.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Rhododendrons – Azaleas; Reality Art! dehaas.2 Mon, 05/20/2019 - 08:08
Rhododendrons and Azaleas are blooming in Northeast Ohio. They come in almost all the colors of the rainbow! Enjoy the art show!
Published on
Authors
Thomas deHaas

Yellow Fields Forever

The dichotomous nature of Cressleaf Groundsel (a.k.a. Butterweed) tests the tolerance of lovers of native wildflowers. On one hand, a sea of golden-yellow flowers carpeting farm fields in Ohio provides welcome relief from highway monotony. On the other hand, upright 2 – 3' tall plants dominating Ohio landscapes presents a weed management challenge.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Fiery Eye-Candy

I came across one of the most striking beetles today that you'll ever find in Ohio. The fittingly named Fiery Searcher Caterpillar Hunter (Calosoma scrutator) are best described as beauty with a bite.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
The European Paper Wasp Conundrum boggs.47 Fri, 05/17/2019 - 13:49
European paper wasps have presented a conundrum over the past several years in Ohio. The literature notes these wasps were first found in North America in the 1970s near Boston, MA. They are now found throughout much of the U.S. and parts of Canada. However, after becoming the dominant paper wasp in Ohio, they've all but disappeared in recent years.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Curtis E. Young
Dave Shetlar
Tree of the Week - Carolina Silverbell stone.91 Fri, 05/17/2019 - 12:49
Carolina silverbell in bloom is a sight to behold. Its delicate white bell-shaped flowers hang down from 1/2 to 1 inch stalks in 2 to 5 flower clusters.
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Bladdergall Enlightenment boggs.47 Thu, 05/16/2019 - 14:06
My introduction to the wonderful world of plant galls began with observing vibrant red, wart-like galls, known as "bladdergalls," adorning the upper leaf surfaces of a silver maple tree. The galls consist entirely of plant tissue and are produced under the plant gene-manipulating direction of the Maple Bladdergall Mite (family Eriophyidae). I'm probably not alone with this being the first gall ever encountered.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Sycamore and Ash Anthracnose

Symptoms of two host-specific fungal anthracnose diseases are becoming apparent in southwest Ohio.  Ash anthracnose was announced by the appearance of irregularly shaped reddish-brown, blotchy spots along the edges of the leaflets.  The leaf necrosis often causes the leaflets to curl and severe infections may lead to defoliation.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Be Alert to Wild Parsnip!

Second-year wild parsnip plants are producing deeply grooved flower stalks topped by characteristic bright yellow blooms in southern Ohio. Landscape managers and gardeners should exercise extreme caution around this non-native invasive biennial plant.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Blue Week in Northwest Ohio stone.91 Wed, 05/15/2019 - 08:21
Each May, the partners of the Green Ribbon Initiative assemble a wide array of programs to encourage people to get out into the amazing region in northwest Ohio and southeast Michigan. This globally unique region is home to a wide variety of plants and animals such as wild blue lupine, Karner blue butterflies, blue spotted salamanders, big and little bluestem, blueberries, bluebirds, blue racers and much, much more.  We love our blues! 
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Bug Museum Eases Fears dehaas.2 Tue, 05/14/2019 - 07:52
Perry Elementary kids find “Bug Museum” Awesome.
Published on
Authors
Thomas deHaas

Dogs Gone Wild!

Dogwoods are in full bloom in Northeast Ohio. They are beautiful: Whites, Pinks and Pale Pink. However, are you sure that is what you want to install?
Published on
Authors
Thomas deHaas

Woody Phomopsis Galls

Dave Leonard (Consulting Arborist, Dave Leonard Tree Services, Lexington, KY) brought a fascinating gall sample to the Greater Cincinnati Diagnostic Walk-About last week. The woody galls were on hickory (Carya sp.) and sparked an informative diagnostic discussion among the participants.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Jim Chatfield
Interesting Oak Leaf Insect Galls boggs.47 Fri, 05/10/2019 - 18:59
I came across a number of interesting oak leaf insect galls during hikes this week in several local parks. Oaks are prime gall-fodder providing support for over 800 different types of galls. It's why I find oaks so interesting. Three-quarters of the gall-makers belong to two families: the wasp family Cynipidae; and the "gall midge" family Cecidomyiidae (cecido means "gall").
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Boxwood Leafminer Flies Fly boggs.47 Thu, 05/09/2019 - 10:58
Participants in this week's Greater Cincinnati BYGLive! Diagnostic Walk-About were treated to an enormous swarm of boxwood leafminer adult flies flitting around their namesake host. The flies are a type of wood midge and belong to the same family (Cecidomyiidae) as gall midges.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Biggest Week in American Birding

What do an estimated 90,000 people from 50 states, 52 countries and 6 continents do each spring? Every year, birders from across the world flock to NW Ohio to see the migrating birds. The Biggest Week in American Birding is underway for the 10th consecutive year. The week officially runs from May 3 - 12 this year.
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
How Plants Mate: Upcoming Program chatfield.1 Mon, 05/06/2019 - 11:18
How Plants Mate is not just for botanists. Understanding the nuances and variability of the different modes is a key horticultural skill, whether plants are dioecious (male and female flowers on separate plants) or the vagaries of grafting and making new plants through propagation, How Plants Mate is central knowledge.
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield

Land of the Bizarre: Tree Moats and Volcano Mulch

Sometimes we run across bizarre things in Ohio landscapes that simply defy explanation. Such was the case yesterday when I came across "tree moats" (sometimes called "mulch moats") in a park near my home in the southwest part of the state. I've encountered this bizarre practice before and fail to fathom the logic behind this ludicrous practice.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Annual of the Week - Lantana crook.46 Thu, 05/02/2019 - 17:03
If you are looking for an annual that flowers all summer long, attracts pollinators and is low maintenance Lantana is your plant. Lantana is native to the tropical Americas and Africa and is in the Verbenaceae Family.  In Ohio, it is grown as a garden annual and is valued for its long season of reliable blooms.
Published on
Authors
Julie Crook
Calico Scale is Puffing Up: Scale Poo is Raining Down boggs.47 Thu, 05/02/2019 - 15:18
Calico scale females spend the winter as small, crusty late instar nymphs (crawlers) stuck on plant stems. Although clearly evident, they may be missed by the uninitiated. Everything changes in the spring when the females "puff-up" as they mature and start pumping out impressive quantities of honeydew.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Secrest Spring Sojourn chatfield.1 Thu, 05/02/2019 - 11:33
Springtime at Secrest. Come forth and see the Spring as you are able. Many wonders await. Here is one such sojourn.
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
SADD Garden brings Happiness! dehaas.2 Thu, 05/02/2019 - 11:08
Students at Perry High School in the group, Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD) installed the Good Decision Garden at the entrance of the school. Students walk past the planting as they arrive and leave school each day, enjoying the flowering display all spring.
Published on
Authors
Thomas deHaas
A Bright Spot with Spotted Lanternfly boggs.47 Wed, 05/01/2019 - 18:16
It may be wise to be skeptical when hearing news that a native bio-ally is coming to our rescue in dealing with a non-native insect pest. Disappointments abound. Non-native juggernauts may steamroll because our native predators, parasitoids, and pathogens (the 3-Ps) just don't recognize them as a food source.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Be Alert for Pine Needle Scale Crawlers boggs.47 Wed, 05/01/2019 - 12:17
Pine Needle Scale was once a common and troubling pest back when Mugo pines rivaled yews and junipers as one of the most common landscape plants in Ohio and Scotch pine was THE Christmas tree grown in our plantations. However, that's changed over the years. As mugos and Scotch have become less common in our landscapes and Christmas tree plantations, so has the occurrence of pine needle scale.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Helicopters Fly over Lake County in May! dehaas.2 Wed, 05/01/2019 - 12:12
What are those Helicopters spraying? Helicopters were flying over Perry, Ohio on May 25, 2018 last year spraying tree lines and nursery stock. What were they spraying? Why from a helicopter? Lake County is one of 51 counties in Ohio that fall under the European Gypsy Moth Quarantine. Currently 51 counties in Ohio are regulated under the Gypsy Moth quarantine. One main requirement for the compliance agreement is that nurseries must apply a USDA-approved insecticide to the entire growing area in mid to late May.
Published on
Authors
Thomas deHaas
Cold Case Cracked: Crime on Crabapple Exposed? chatfield.1 Tue, 04/30/2019 - 08:05
Frost cracks occur on susceptible plants such as crabapple during rapid temperature fluctuations. This describes such a case.
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
It's the Most WONDERFUL Time of the Year............... If you're a Gardener dehaas.2 Mon, 04/29/2019 - 14:50
It all happened at once this year. Forsythias, Magnolias, Dogwoods, Serviceberry are all blooming near the same time.
Published on
Authors
Thomas deHaas
Rusts Arise! boggs.47 Fri, 04/26/2019 - 17:44
Colorful displays of three types of rust fungi are appearing on junipers in Ohio. The fungi belong to the genus Gymnosporangium and they complete part of their life-cycle on members of the plant genus Juniperus and the other part of their life-cycle on members of the family Rosaceae. In biological terms, this type of life-cycle is known as "heteroecious."
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Kissing Bug Hysteria Rises Again boggs.47 Thu, 04/25/2019 - 18:29
Several national news networks reported yesterday that a kissing bug had been found in Delaware.  The story was echoed today by a number of print and online news outlets.  Frankly, the story is much ado about nothing.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Red Bark on Sycamore and London Planetrees

Last Wednesday, Jerry Frankenhoff (Urban Forester, Great Parks of Hamilton County) sent an e-mail message asking about red staining on the bark of sycamore trees. He wrote that he'd never seen anything like this before. I was shocked when I looked at his attached image. Likewise, I had never before seen the unusual reddening symptoms on sycamore or any other tree.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Imperial Fritillary

The imperial fritillary or crown imperial (Fritillary imperialis) is blooming in gardens in northwest Ohio now. The plant comes in various shades of yellows, oranges and reds. The pendulous flowers are about 2" long and are found clustered at the terminal end of stout and leafless stem that towers above the leaves below. Above the flowers are a sheaf of smaller leaves that form a tuft of green as shown in the photo below.
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Leaking Trees boggs.47 Fri, 04/19/2019 - 18:35
From my perspective, one of the most rewarding things about plant problem diagnostics is not just about achieving a successful diagnosis; it's what we learn from the instructive twists and turns along the way. Arthur Ashe captured it nicely, "Success is a journey, not a destination. The doing is often more important than the outcome."
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Insecticide Options for Protecting Ash Trees from Emerald Ash Borer stone.91 Fri, 04/19/2019 - 09:42
The multi-state bulletin, Insecticide Options for Protecting Ash Trees from Emerald Ash Borer, has recently been updated and the Third Edition is available on the emeraldashborer.info website as a PDF. 
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
What's Your GDD? stone.91 Wed, 04/17/2019 - 14:07

Has anyone every asked you, "what's your GDD?" While many of you may have responded "yes," or may have even thought, "I ask others all the time"; I know there are some that probably yelled out their current GDD when simply reading the title of this alert. If you are still wondering what the heck is GDD - keep on reading, you won't be disappointed and will hopefully click on the link below to find out your GDD to date. 

  

GDD stands for growing degree days. GDD are a measurement of the growth and development of plants and insects during the...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Be Alert for Boxwood Leafminer boggs.47 Fri, 04/12/2019 - 15:13
Boxwoods with yellow to brown leaves are common this spring in a number of locations in Ohio. Some of the leaf browning is due to winter injury; some was caused by salt damage. However, a close examination may also reveal the telltale blister-like leaf symptoms caused by the boxwood leafminer.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
How To Hire An Arborist stone.91 Fri, 04/12/2019 - 11:08
Ohio State University Extension's Home Yard and Garden FactSheet HYG-1032 has been update and is available online. The OSU FactSheet includes tips for selecting an arborist and resources available to help find an arborist.  
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Green Tigers Prowling Forest Trails boggs.47 Wed, 04/10/2019 - 19:02
I spotted one of my favorite insect predators darting about on a forest trail yesterday: six-spotted tiger beetles. Their common name is well justified as these tiny "tigers" hunt, kill, and eat other insects. They are equipped with huge eyes for excellent eyesight, long legs for agile speed, and huge mandibles for grabbing prey.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Magnificent Magnolias dehaas.2 Tue, 04/09/2019 - 09:18
Spring has sprung and one of the first flowering trees and shrubs in Northeastern Ohio are Magnolias.
Published on
Authors
Thomas deHaas
Eastern Tent Caterpillars, Extrafloral Nectaries, and Ants boggs.47 Fri, 04/05/2019 - 18:36
Overwintered eastern tent caterpillar (ETC) (Malacosoma americanum) moth eggs are hatching in southwest Ohio; a sure sign that spring has sprung. As their common name implies, the caterpillars are accomplished tent-makers displaying their silk handiwork in branch forks.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Soil Mining Bees on the Wing boggs.47 Fri, 04/05/2019 - 14:00
Dalton Westerbeck with Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum e-mailed me Wednesday to report that soil "mining bees" are waking from their winter naps. Dalton is an ISA Certified Arborist and an Ohio State Beekeepers Association, Master Beekeeper. He is locating and marking all of the mining bee "colonies" in the Grove so he can document their population densities and seasonal development.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Weed of the Week - Purple Deadnettle crook.46 Thu, 04/04/2019 - 20:05
Purple deadnettle is beginning to show up in landscapes now that spring has arrived and the temperature is getting warmer. A winter annual, purple deadnettle is germinating now from the seeds they produced last year.
Published on
Authors
Julie Crook
Joe Boggs
Painted Hickory Borers Flare-Up from Firewood boggs.47 Tue, 04/02/2019 - 18:13
I received an e-mail message over the weekend from a homeowner asking what kind of beetles could be emerging from firewood stored in an unheated garage. I replied there were two strong candidates: painted hickory borers and banded ash borers. In response, the homeowner sent some very clear pictures yesterday: they were painted hickory borers.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Spring has Sprung.... APRIL FOOLS! dehaas.2 Mon, 04/01/2019 - 10:33
Old man winter plays a cruel joke on Northeast Ohio with 3-5 inches of snow. This was just in time for April Fool’s day, which just happens to coincide with the Cleveland Indians Home Opener this year.
Published on
Authors
Thomas deHaas
Name That Insect . . . stone.91 Wed, 03/27/2019 - 17:21
As temperatures warm, people are outside enjoying the almost, spring-like weather. There are still a few waiting for even warmer temperatures to arrive and stick around for more than a day - you know who you are. As everyone migrates outdoors as temperatures rise, the chances of an insect encounter will be pretty high. At the first encounter, many people may have an urge to "eliminate" the six legged species.
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Learn More About Ash Hazards stone.91 Wed, 03/27/2019 - 17:04
Earlier this month, Joe Boggs authored a BYGL Alert entitled, Ash Breakage: the Hazard Continues (March 19, 2019). To follow-up with this topic, we wanted to alert you to an upcoming webinar from EAB University called Dead Ash Dangers and Considerations for Risk and Removal.
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
The Yellow of Winter Aconite Warms Gardeners Heart - Even Though the Temperatures Remain Cold stone.91 Wed, 03/27/2019 - 11:28
Gardeners are always looking for signs of spring. Although the calendar tells us it is officially spring, Mother-Nature can sometimes send mixed messages.
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Be Alert to Poison Hemlock boggs.47 Tue, 03/26/2019 - 13:37
Poison hemlock is a non-native biennial weed that spends its first year as a low-growing basal rosette; the stage that is currently very apparent. During its second year, plants produce erect, towering stalks and multi-branched stems topped with umbrella-like flowers. Mature plants can measure 6-10' tall and are prolific seed producers.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Be Alert for White Pine Weevil boggs.47 Tue, 03/26/2019 - 12:25
White Pine Weevil females spend the winter out of sight cooling their six heels in the duff beneath their pine or spruce targets. As temperatures warm in the spring, they climb their hosts to feed and lay eggs in the terminals. Sap oozing from small holes in the terminals is a calling card of this weevil.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Ash Breakage: the Hazard Continues boggs.47 Tue, 03/19/2019 - 15:27
During our BYGL Zoom Inservice today, the group discussed the continual hazard presented by ash trees that have been killed by (EAB, Agrilus planipennis). Participants located throughout Ohio noted that walks in the woods remain a serious risk with dead ash trees breaking or toppling over onto walking trails.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
The Girdle you HATE to see! dehaas.2 Thu, 03/14/2019 - 14:52
What is the worst girdle? A girdling root or roots. These seemingly harmless roots will eventually weaken, strangling and in many cases kill the tree. Or, girdling roots will weaken the tree to a point making it susceptible to break off in the wind.
Published on
Authors
Thomas deHaas
Dawn of Squirrelly Bark-Stripping! boggs.47 Wed, 03/13/2019 - 19:50
Brian Heinz (Horticulturist, Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum) recently sent me pictures showing a dawn redwood with the bark on the main stem stripped in patches. The damage extended from a few feet above the ground to around 20 – 25' up the tree.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Lesser Celandine is on the Rise boggs.47 Mon, 03/04/2019 - 13:31
Lesser Celandine plants are starting to rise in southern Ohio. This non-native is known as a "spring ephemeral" owing to the time of year when the short-lived plants and flowers are present. The majority of this weed's hide-and-seek life-cycle is spent hidden from view as underground tubers.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

National Invasive Species Awareness Week, February 25 - March 3, 2019

Today, February 25, 2019 kicks-off National Invasive Species Awareness Week! While meetings, programs, and events are scheduled in Washington DC, we can use the week as a way to raise awareness right here in the buckeye state. Please share this alert with your colleagues, clients, friends and family to help spread the word about invasive species. 
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

Cold Temperatures Blow Into The Buckeye State

I think it is safe to say everyone is watching the weather forecast, specifically the bone-chilling temperatures that are making their way towards Ohio. Temperatures are predicted to be below zero and falling into the double digits beginning this evening (01.29.2019) through Thursday (01.31.2019). Wind chills are expected to be in the negative twenties, and could reach the negative forties depending upon location.
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

Open Comment Period Following New Additions to the OIPC Invasive Plant List

The Ohio Invasive Plant Council (OIPC) recently released information on the assessment of 9 new plant species for inclusion on their list of invasive plants. With this announcement also begins a 6-month public comment period for the new additions to the list.  Comments, suggestions or questions during this period should be directed to Theresa Culley (theresa.culley@uc.edu).  
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Joe Boggs

ODA Announces 2019 Gypsy Moth Open Houses

The gypsy moth is a non-native pest that feeds on leaves and needles of over 300 different trees in the buckeye state. The feeding injury occurs in the spring and early summer when populations are present. The early season feeding, when heavy, causes the plants to push new leaves that ultimately are the food-factories for the rest of the year. Healthy deciduous trees can usually recover as long as there isn't repeat defoliation year after year. Evergreens can die in a single season. 
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire...

 

 

A diagnostic sample this week had me thinking about this yuletide carol.  A visitor brought a bowl of chestnuts to the Extension Office this week.  This tree has been producing for many years, but the nuts within never fill out into the round tasty treats associated with the holidays.  What is going on?

 

 

...

Published on
Authors
Ashley Kulhanek

You're a Mean One... Mr. Recluse?

 

It's the holiday season (the holiday season...) and many are digging in attics and basements for decorations and bows, stored sweaters, coats and yes... SNOW boots.  Inevitably, Extension offices receive calls about the unfortunate spider (or stink bug) that was found, dead or alive, while sifting through packages, boxes or bags that haven't seen the light of day for a year.  The question is, "Is it a brown recluse?"

 

 

...

Published on
Authors
Ashley Kulhanek
2019 Commercial Applicator Recertification Conferences andon.1 Mon, 12/03/2018 - 13:47
Commercial pesticide applicators may now register for the 2019 Commercial Pesticide Recertification Conferences at pested.osu.edu, or by clicking the links below.
Published on
Authors
Jennifer Andon
Chrissy Kaminski
An Unusual Insect-Killing Fungus boggs.47 Fri, 11/30/2018 - 16:27
I received an e-mail message this past Wednesday from Tom Macy (ODNR) concerning efforts to discover locations of the non-native elongate hemlock scale in Ohio and other states. His message included two attached images taken by Bill Laubscher (Pennsylvania Bureau of Forestry) on November 20 that showed both the scale as well as odd looking blackened accretions on hemlock needles.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
An Icy Awakening boggs.47 Fri, 11/16/2018 - 16:27
The Tri-State region in southwest Ohio experienced an ice storm overnight this past Wednesday. Although the official accumulation of ice due to freezing rain reported at the Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky International Airport was only 0.22", the number of homes and businesses in Greater Cincinnati without power yesterday morning exceeded 200,000. Why such a high impact from only 1/4" of ice?
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Strengthen Your Diagnostic Skills Through Learning stone.91 Wed, 11/07/2018 - 10:21
I recently heard "snowflakes" are in the forecast. As temperatures drop, it is a great time to get indoors, increase knowledge, network and earn credits. One of those opportunities in December is the OSU Green Industry Short Course held in conjunction with the Ohio Turfgrass Foundation's (OTF) Conference and Tradeshow. It is one registration that covers three days of training broken out into different educational tracks.
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Ohio Turfgrass Conference and Tradeshow and OSU Short Course - December 4 - 6, 2018 stone.91 Tue, 11/06/2018 - 06:35
The season is winding down and now is the time to plan your educational opportunities - learn the latest, earn credits and network with others in the industry. The Ohio Turfgrass Foundation and Tradeshow in cooperation with the Ohio State University Green Industry Short Course will be held on December 4 - 6 at the Columbus Convention Center.
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
New Ohio State App Helps Users Identify, Prevent and Control Bed Bugs stone.91 Mon, 10/29/2018 - 17:49
Not sure if the dark speck that crawled across your desk at work was a bed bug? Wondering if the tiny insect you saw on the seat next to you at the movie theater or on the bus was a bed bug? How about that fleck you thought you saw on the corner of the mattress the last time you stayed in a hotel? A researcher at The Ohio State University has created a free new app to help you figure it out.
Published on
Keep the Vampires away this Halloween with GARLIC jagger.6 Mon, 10/29/2018 - 09:31
Garlic has been used centuries for culinary, medicinal, and religious purposes.
Published on
Authors
Carri Jagger
A Diagnostic Dilemma Reveals an Unusual Plant Disease boggs.47 Tue, 10/23/2018 - 16:33
We strive to post BYGL Alerts based on timely, current observations. However, sometimes our discoveries are made much later as we try to identify what we photographed during the growing season. Such is the case with this report.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Kissing Cousin Bugs boggs.47 Fri, 10/19/2018 - 13:35
I've received four e-mail messages since late last week from concerned Ohio homeowners who asked about controlling kissing bugs. However, two included images of western conifer seed bugs which is a type of leaffooted bug. One message had images of boxelder bugs and one person included a very nice picture of a wheel bug found on their porch.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
A Society of Unsung Heroes boggs.47 Thu, 10/18/2018 - 15:43
I did a teaching presentation on Asian longhorned beetle this Tuesday at the Horticulture Inspection Society (HIS), Central Chapter's 48th Annual Conference held in Holland, MI. Other presentations covered international exports, plant taxonomy, hemlock woolly adelgid, spotted lanternfly, to name just a few topics
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
My Pine tree is dead; what should I do? Maybe Nothing! dehaas.2 Thu, 10/11/2018 - 14:32
As the leaves on deciduous trees change colors and fall to the ground, and evergreens remain green, people may ask why is my evergreen dying? Maybe because it’s not an evergreen. There are two common deciduous narrow leaf trees that lose their needles in the fall; Bald Cypress and the Dawn Redwood.
Published on
Authors
Thomas deHaas
Get Ready for a Little Breaking and Entering boggs.47 Thu, 10/11/2018 - 14:18
Our drop in temperatures throughout Ohio will no doubt convince fall home invading insects that it's time to seek winter quarters. These unwelcomed guests typically include Boxelder Bugs; Western Conifer Seed Bugs; Magnolia Seed Bugs; Multicolored Asian Lady Beetles; and the most notorious of all, Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Calico Scale Crawlers Move to Stems boggs.47 Thu, 10/11/2018 - 11:03
Infestations of the non-native Calico Scale can be difficult to detect during the growing season. However, clusters of crawlers on blackened stems coupled with dead females are key diagnostic features for spotting calico scale at this time of the year.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Fall Color: It’s not just for leaves anymore! dehaas.2 Thu, 10/11/2018 - 10:26
As we approach fall and its wide range of colors, we sometimes forget about other sources of color in the landscape: FRUIT! As you plan for next year and what plants to consider, don’t think just about flowers or fall color, consider the fruit.
Published on
Authors
Thomas deHaas
Great Lakes Apple Crunch Day - October 11, 2018 stone.91 Wed, 10/10/2018 - 10:31
Thursday, October 11, 2018 is Great Lakes Apple Crunch Day. The purpose of the day is to celebrate National Farm to School Month by crunching into locally and regionally grown apples. Everyone, regardless of your age, is welcome to Crunch! 
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Why Trees Matter - October 24, 2018 stone.91 Tue, 10/09/2018 - 21:51
Join us October 24, 2018 for the annual ‘Why Trees Matter Forum’ at the Miller Pavilion at Secrest Arboretum, Wooster, Ohio. We love trees - do you?  
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
A Spicy Surprise boggs.47 Tue, 10/09/2018 - 19:22
I received a container of ground cayenne peppers with a surprise far greater than the capsaicin kick. The product was heavily infested with cigarette beetles. The homeowner noted they hadn't used the product for some time. However, they had noticed small brown beetles buzzing around their home and collecting on their window seals.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
A Most Unusual Grub boggs.47 Sat, 10/06/2018 - 12:11
I came across a green June beetle larva (grub) last Thursday slowly slinking across a driveway. This is one of largest and strangest white grubs you'll ever see in Ohio. First, the mature grubs are huge measuring well over 1" in length. They look like white grubs on steroids.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Bullet Galls and Their Guards boggs.47 Sat, 10/06/2018 - 09:39
Oak bullet galls have reached their maximum size for the season and will soon release their developing female wasps. The galls arise from twigs and are produced under the direction of several species of cynipid wasps (family Cynipidae). So, you may find different types of bullet galls depending on the exact gall-making wasp species that directed their creation.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Small but Mighty Fly

I came across a beautiful little native fly this week while taking pictures of pollinators on common goldenrod. The fly, Trichopoda pennipes, doesn't have a common name, but some web-based resources refer to it as the "feather-legged fly." This is not entirely correct.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

What Lies Beneath

I enjoy making unexpected discoveries with one revelation leading to the next and then the next like pulling apart one of those Russian nesting dolls. My chain of discoveries started with finding "fresh" puffball mushrooms during a walk in a local park. I was thrilled because I had never taken pictures of the early stages of these peculiar looking mushrooms.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
The Saga of Prickly-Ash...And Giant Swallowtail Butterflies...And chatfield.1 Wed, 09/26/2018 - 15:08
Prickly-ash trees, giant swallowtail butterflies, furocoumarins, lime disease, emerald ash borer: oh what a tale these weave.
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield

Cucumber Beetles Wreaking Havoc - IN THE FLOWER BEDS!

Take note!  Every few years it seems that there are high populations of spotted cucumber beetles that have moved from vegetable gardens into the flower beds.  They love to feed on the supple, tender sweet petals of dahlia, mum, petunia, portulaca, sunflower and many others.  Joe Boggs did a quick check in his area and found them feeding on Jerusalum artichokes.  Joe also noted that this is his "go-to indicator plant" when inspecting for this pest in his area.  They seemed to be working the salvia but not actually feeding on it.  
Published on
Authors
Pam Bennett

Annual of the Week - Popcorn Plant

Scratch and sniff horticulture - there is nothing better. How many remember the stickers that you had when you were younger? The ones that with a scratch of your nail, the smell radiated from the paper. This should have been a sticker to enjoy year round, not just during the growing season! And then of course the plant should be enjoyed during the late spring, summer and into early fall.
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

Lesson Learned

This week, I had a backyard hobby orchard grower stop in the office. Extension has always been a resource for his father when he was growing, and now the son. While we discussed common pest problems of apples and pear this growing season, the grower also shared a "lesson learned" last winter. 
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

That's gold, Jerry! GOLD!

I'm an unabashed fan of common goldenrod (a.k.a. Canada goldenrod). Its flowers are an important late-season food source for pollinators drawing in a wide range of insects and their yellowish to gold-tone makes a nice photo backdrop. In fact, this native perennial offers a pollinator photo op paradise.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Ohio Pollinator Habitat Initiative - Annual Milkweed Pod Collection  stone.91 Wed, 09/19/2018 - 17:07
The Ohio Pollinator Habitat Initiative (OPHI) is encouraging all Ohioans who have grown common milkweed this season to harvest seed pods and take them to a participating Soil and Water Conservation Office. The Annual Milkweed Pollination Collection is in its third year in Ohio. In 2015, 7 counties piloted the milkweed seed pod collection. The project has grown and it is estimated that over 22 million seeds have been collected by volunteers across the buckeye state over the 3 years.  
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

The Impatient Gardener

Jewelweeds or touch-me-nots are common in eastern woodlands, as two species, the yellow Impatiens pallida and the orange Impatiens capensis. There are more jewelweeds than meet the eye, however. Read on.
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Jason Veil

Blue-Winged Wasps Cruising Lawns

Blue-winged wasps are continuing to make low-level flights over lawns in southwest Ohio. As their common name implies, the wasps have dark blue wings. Their legs and thorax are also dark blue. However, their most distinguishing features are two light-yellow spots at the top of their orange-tipped abdomens.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

A Non-Native, Native Lizard

If you're ever visiting Cincinnati during the dog days of summer, keep your eyes peeled for a fascinating non-native lizard scurrying over rock walls, darting across sidewalks, and lurking in landscaping. These lizards are intriguing because the story of how they got to Cincinnati and their ascent to equal treatment amongst native reptiles is almost unprecedented for reptiles in Ohio.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Redbud Leaffolder Damage

Participants at last week's Greater Cincinnati Diagnostic Walk-About were thrilled to view the unusual leaf symptoms caused by the Redbud Leaffolder on its namesake host. Or, maybe it was just me who was thrilled. Most of the leaf damage this season is produced by the current 3rd generation caterpillars.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) Cooperative Eradication Program in Ohio Scores Another "Win"

Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) is potentially the most devastating non-native pest to have ever arrived in North America. The beetle kills trees belonging to 12 genera in 9 plant families. This includes all native maples, a preferred host. Successful eradication is essential to avoiding a catastrophic loss of trees on a scale never before seen in the U.S.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Monarch Migration

The annual migration of monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippusis) has begun. It has to be an amazing adventure if you are the butterfly, or spectacular site if you are a person able to observe the migration in progress.
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Beech Blight Aphids Shake Their Booty boggs.47 Wed, 09/05/2018 - 13:34
I believe no other insect upstages Beech Bligh Aphids in entertainment value. During a visit to a Lake County, OH, park last Thursday, Jim Chatfield and I came across a cluster of these engaging aphids shaking their woolly derrieres in what appeared to be a synchronous samba. All we needed was "(Shake, Shake, Shake) Shake Your Booty" by KC and the Sunshine Band blaring in the background to complete the effect.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Jim Chatfield
Season Finale for Catalpa Hornworms boggs.47 Mon, 09/03/2018 - 16:00
Catalpas (Catalpa spp., family Bignoniaceae) have long been one of my favorite trees. Both the Northern Catalpa (C. speciose) and its shorter southern cousin, S. bignonioides, sport huge, orchid-like flowers that attract a bevy of pollinators, particularly bumble bees.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Thousand Cankers Disease (TCD) Update – Don't Rush to Cut Walnut Trees!

The long-term outlook for eastern black walnuts seemed dire when the Thousand Cankers Disease (TCD) complex was confirmed in Butler County, OH, in 2013. Thankfully, TCD has not followed the devastating trajectory we originally feared. It is not rolling through our native black walnuts à la emerald ash borer on native ash. The two situations are like apples-to-oranges.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

No Asian Hornets in the U.S.

When you read or hear about "Asian hornets," you need to keep two things in mind. First, the "Asian" moniker has been commonly applied to at least three hornet species native to various Asian regions. The second thing to remember is that none of these hornets have been found living in the U.S.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Invasive Plant Species Alert - Japanese Stiltgrass

Japanese stiltgrass was not on my radar until a recent visit to a local park. It had piqued my interest because of the plants lushness beneath a full canopy of trees. My first thought was, what is this grass that could be a recommendation for shady sights? My excitement quickly waned because our hosts explained that the annual grass unfortunately, is an invasive species.
Published on
Authors
Cindy Meyer

Eastern Filbert Blight on Hazelnut

Eastern filbert blight is a disease of filbert and hazelnut trees (Corylus spp.). It is caused by a native fungus. In a natural setting, filbert blight causes a relatively minor disease on native American hazelnut shrubs (Corylus americana) causing small cankers on the stems and branches. However, the disease is lethal to introduced and commercially important European hazelnut (Corylus avellana) in orchards.
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

Annual of the Week - Cotton

This interesting annual caught my attention earlier in the season, and it just kept getting better and better.  As the cotton plant grows, it can be quite the conversation piece. It can be planted in the ground or in containers. It prefers poor and dry soil conditions. The planting at Toledo Botanical Garden (TBG) is a mass planting in the Artist Village where the cotton will be harvested and utilized by local artists. The plants are approximately 4 feet tall.
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

Bagworms are Wrapping Up

Most of the Common Bagworms I looked at yesterday in southern Ohio and central Indiana had initiated their annual "tie-off" in preparation for pupation. Bags are tightly closed and tied with silk to a twig or other anchorage point. This means the damage caused by these caterpillars wrapped in silk bags festooned with host plant debris is drawing to a close.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Diagnostics: Coloring Outside The Lines chatfield.1 Fri, 08/24/2018 - 14:21
Plant Problem Diagnostics is ever a challenge, a delightful challenge that encompasses a vast array of the diversity of nature. Let us look at some of the colorful examples seen this past week as we lead up to the 85th Ohio Plant Diagnostic Workshop on September 7.
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Joe Boggs
The Best Herbaceous Plants for My Garden Are... draper.15 Thu, 08/23/2018 - 15:49

Have you been thinking about renovating your flower garden?  Trying to decide which perennial and annual flowers would grow best in your garden?   Well, guess no longer!  Come spend a day with Pam Bennett, OSU Extension Horticulture Educator, and find out for yourself.  In Clark County, Pam and her volunteers specialize in herbaceous ornamental plant trials and evaluate more than 200 varieties of annuals and two genera of ornamental grasses yearly!

 

...
Published on
Authors
Erik Draper
Slime Mold on Turfgrass stone.91 Wed, 08/22/2018 - 18:37
Slime molds can be found on all types of turfgrasses – from cultivars chosen for lawns to weedy grasses that pop up in places were regular maintenance just isn’t regular. Slime molds are usually more noticeable following extended periods of leaf wetness. With recent rains experienced in NW Ohio, people have been asking "what is going on in my lawn?"
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Teach Your Children Well...About Trees chatfield.1 Tue, 08/21/2018 - 07:59
In 1927 Edmund Secrest encouraged each child within us to learnabout our common trees. The message stands for us still today.
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Fall Webworm Update boggs.47 Mon, 08/20/2018 - 14:56
Fall Webworm has two generations per season in Ohio. The "fall" in the webworm's common name is based on the appearance of second generation nests late in the season. The first generation began to appear in southern Ohio in late May (see, "Spring, Summer, Fall Webworms," June 13, 2018) and second generation caterpillars are now on the scene.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Sneaky Stink Bugs boggs.47 Fri, 08/17/2018 - 17:16
I'm seeing damage on ripening tomatoes in southwest Ohio caused by Brown Marmorated Stink Bug nymphs. I first saw damage from both the adults and nymphs on my own tomatoes in 2015. At that time, we didn't know which direction BMSB populations would take in the southwest part of the state.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Morning Dew Brings Gossamer Creations to Light boggs.47 Fri, 08/17/2018 - 14:16
This is the time of the year in Ohio when female spiders of many web spinning species reach maturity. They become most evident when their gossamer creations are illuminated by early morning sunlight reflecting off a heavy dew. I was lucky to experience this magical but fleeting light effect during an early morning hike around my neighborhood a few days ago.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
A Real Sweet Dilemma draper.15 Wed, 08/15/2018 - 21:43

I was asked to help a vegetable grower figure out what was going on with something wreaking havoc and eating his ripening sweet corn.  Typically, when someone mentions sweet corn and problems, the first demon that comes to mind are those little masked, sweet-toothed bandits, known as raccoons!   When I arrived out in the field, I was surprised to see the corn stalks standing tall in nice rows.  The masked marauders climb up the cornstalk to the get to the ripest, uppermost ear of corn; consequently, the corn stalks are most often snapped off or pushed over down to the...

Published on
Authors
Erik Draper
A Blooming Bias draper.15 Tue, 08/14/2018 - 20:13

In the world of plants, most often our attention focuses on bloom color, size and timing of when blooms will make an impact in our landscape.  Blooms are nice as a moving focal point during the growing season, but people become a little upset when plants don’t do what they are supposed to and only when they are supposed to do it.  This is the time of year that concerned citizens call into the office wondering whether or not their magnolias or rhododendrons are going to die.  When asked why they think that the plants are going to die, the response is always the same, “...

Published on
Authors
Erik Draper

Blister Beetles Wreaking Havoc on Tomatoes

I received two e-mails over the weekend from backyard gardeners in southwest Ohio with pictures showing Black Blister Beetles swarming over tomato plants. Black blister beetles as well as Margined Blister Beetles are the two most common species found in Ohio. Both beetles are capable of showing-up in large numbers to feed on the leaves and flowers of a wide range of perennials and annuals including vegetable plants.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Marestail (Horseweed)

Marestail, which is also known as "Canadian horseweed," or just "horseweed," has moved from field crops to become a plague in landscapes and nurseries. The main reason is that certain biotypes are resistant to glyphosate (e.g. Roundup) as well as a number of other agricultural herbicides. In fact, this native North America plant has become such a problem in Ohio it has been added to the state's noxious weeds list.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Monstrous Porcelain-Berry Barrage

I posted a BYGL Alert last October on Porcelain-Berry when the problem berries were fully ripened and available for widespread distribution by birds and other animals. I'm revisiting this ever-expanding non-native vine because its invasive arc in southwest Ohio is being compared by some horticultural professionals as possibly rivaling kudzu.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Embrace the Milkweed Menagerie boggs.47 Fri, 08/10/2018 - 15:25
This is the time of the year when the menagerie of insects that feed on members of the dogbane family (Apocynaceae), including common milkweed, seem to arrive en masse … to the consternation of monarch lovers! Some aim to reserve milkweeds for monarchs. What about other native insects that feed on milkweeds; let them eat cake?
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Basswood Leafminer Damage Becoming Evident boggs.47 Tue, 08/07/2018 - 17:15
BYGL readers should be familiar with the Basswood Leafminer. We've reported on the skeletonizing and leafmining activities of this native beetle on its namesake host, American basswood for years. High populations cause entire basswood trees to become reddish-brown. Travelers on the northern portion of I-75 in Ohio will soon be treated to "flaming" basswoods gracing the woodlots along the route.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
'Ruby Spice' Clethra: Shrub of the Week chatfield.1 Tue, 08/07/2018 - 08:34
Clethra 'Ruby Spice' is a small shrub with excellent foliage and flower characteristics. Tolerant of shade and clay soils, clethra thrives in moist but well-drained organic soils. The aroma of the flowers is what summer is all about.
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
August 8 - Sneak A Zucchini On Your Neighbor's Front Porch Day stone.91 Tue, 08/07/2018 - 07:52
If you are a vegetable gardener, and if you grow zucchini, you probably have enough for you, your family, neighbors and friends, and still may have some extras. Celebrate those plentiful zucchini yields with OSU Extension on Wednesday, August 8, 2018.
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Annual of the Week - Dahlia stone.91 Sun, 08/05/2018 - 21:19
Dahlias can be a nice annual addition into Ohio gardens. Although a perennial in its native range in Mexico and Central America, there are consider annuals in Ohio. With a little extra work the tubers can be lift in the fall, stored over the winter, and planted the following spring. 
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Bagworms: The Mamas and the Papas chatfield.1 Sun, 08/05/2018 - 11:22
Bagworms create bags from the hosts they feed on, causing damage to a wide range of hosts. Herein is a discussion of some bagworm biology and cultural connections.
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Joe Boggs
Ohio Local Foods Week 2018 stone.91 Sat, 08/04/2018 - 23:42
Can we all agree that there is something special about the taste of a locally grown tomato – unless of course you don’t like tomatoes. The same can be true of other fruits and vegetables grown in our own gardens or produced by a local farmer. Beyond the taste, there is something to be said about food being produced in the region rather than shipped across the state, country or even oceans. There is a renewed appeal in local.   
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
51st Annual NGLCO Summer Field Day for Nurseries, Designers, Landscape Contractors and Vendors to be held on Tuesday, August 14th. dehaas.2 Thu, 08/02/2018 - 14:06
Nursery Growers, Landscapers, Designers and Vendors are invited to a fun-filled, information-packed day at the 51st annual NGLCO Summer Field Day at Chalet Debonne' Vineyards, Madison Ohio on Tuesday August 14th, 2018.
Published on
Jumping Spider Diagnostic Challenge boggs.47 Thu, 08/02/2018 - 09:48
Jumping spiders (family Salticidae) get their name from their ability to leap long distances with a single bound. These small spiders use their jumping talent to travel great distances, evade enemies, and pounce on prey.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

New OSU FactSheet on Growing Onions

Did you know that the common onion (Allium cepa) is the most popular vegetable in Ohio home gardens? Onions are known to be adaptable, which helps onions to be grown in various regions and zones. Sabrina Schirtzinger, Extension Educator in Knox County, recently authored OSU FactSheet, HYG-1616, Growing Onions in the Garden. 
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

New OSU FactSheet on Hydrangeas

There seems to be a growing interest in hydrangeas. Along with the new or renewed interest in this genus, there are some common questions about plant selection, pruning and care. Eric Barrett, Extension Educator in Mahoning County, recently authored an OSU FactSheet HYG 1263, Selecting Hydrangeas for the Home Landscape to help gardeners understand this group of plants in the genus Hydrangea. 
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
The Twisted Story of Rose Rosette Disease boggs.47 Mon, 07/30/2018 - 18:38
I came across several multiflora roses while walking in a county park last Friday that were being hammered by Rose Rosette Disease (RRD). It was a reminder that this non-native invasive rose serves as a significant source of the rose rosette virus that is responsible for producing Rose Rosette Disease (RRD), as well as the eriophyid mite that is responsible for spreading the virus.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Jim Chatfield
Sumac Gall Aphid: More Than Meets the Eye boggs.47 Mon, 07/30/2018 - 11:24
The bladder-like galls produced the Sumac Gall Aphid on the leaflet midveins of its namesake host are almost fully expanded in southwest Ohio. They currently measure between 1/2" to 1" in length; however, despite their size, their light green color can make them difficult to detect.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Love Thou the Rose, Don't Leave Galls on its Stem boggs.47 Thu, 07/26/2018 - 17:12
The English novelist, Edward G. Bulwer-Lytton, actually said, "Love thou the rose, yet leave it on its stem." I adjusted his quote to illustrate how to control bizarre looking mossy rose galls. The hairy-looking galls are produced under the direction of a gall-wasp.  Ridding roses of the galls rids them of the wasp.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Ohio Christmas Tree Association (OCTA) at the Ohio State Fair

Earlier this week, a team from OSU Extension judged Christmas trees at the 2018 Ohio State Fair. All the trees were grown in Ohio. Trees were judged on shape, fullness, color and overall appearance. Trees needed to be between 6 and 8 feet tall, have a handle between 6 and 12 inches, and have a correct range of taper based on the species.
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

The Clock is Ticking on White Pine Weevil Control

I received an e-mail message today from an arborist in southwest Ohio who included images that showed damage caused by White Pine Weevil. Main shoots (terminal leaders) on white pine and Norway spruce were wilted and brown. Some of the shoot tips were curved into "shepherd’s crooks;" the curling occurs when tender new shoots dehydrate while they are still pliable.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Tale of Two Crabapples: Diagnostics Is Never Easy chatfield.1 Wed, 07/18/2018 - 10:56

Summertime: And Diagnosis is never easy.  Even with something as dear to my pathological brain as apple scab and cedar-apple (or hawthorn) rust on crabapple. I was on a walkabout at a northeast Ohio commercial landscape two weeks ago and came upon side-by-side crabapples – and the different symptoms of these two diseases on crabapple.

 

On one crabapple, apple scab infections caused some affected leaves to turn yellow before dropping; on the other crabapple the leaves turned orangish-red (the cover photo). As for rust, the lesions on the upper leaf surfaces of one crabapple...

Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Joe Boggs
Gypsy Moth - The Next Generation stone.91 Fri, 07/13/2018 - 18:35
Adult gypsy moths are active in NW Ohio. The males are brown to tan in color, fly during the day in a zig zag pattern and have feather-like antenna. The females are white and do not fly. The male moths seek out the females, they mate and she lays an egg mass that can contain up to 500 eggs. It is those eggs that will produce the next generation.
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Yellow Poplar Weevil Reared its Snout in Central Ohio boggs.47 Fri, 07/13/2018 - 15:26
We held our OSU Extension Nursery, Landscape, and Turf Team (ENLTT) meeting yesterday at Dawes Arboretum. Among the beautiful landscapes and impressive collections was clear evidence that Yellow Poplar Weevils had made a return appearance in central Ohio. The adults feed on leaves and the larvae feed within leaves as leafminers.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Robber Flies: The F-22s of the Insect World boggs.47 Wed, 07/11/2018 - 19:44
Few carnivorous insects can match the amazing acrobatics and predatory proficiency of robber flies (family Asilidae) in their pursuit of prey. Adults of all species are predators and they will attack a variety of insects; even "armed" prey and insects much larger than their own body size.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Pollinator Pretense boggs.47 Wed, 07/11/2018 - 15:42
My BYGL Alert last week on magnolia scale honeydew attracting flies [see "Magnolias Drawing Flies," June 5] drew several e-mails about flies coming to flowers. I must admit that I never paid much attention to flies coming to flowers until relatively recently.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Wheel Bugs are Rolling Along boggs.47 Wed, 07/11/2018 - 10:51
Curtis Young (OSU Extension, Van Wert County) brought an oak sample to the OSU Master Gardener Volunteer Diagnostic Workshop Monday in Miami County that included wheel bug nymphs in various instar stages of development including some late instars. This means the unusual looking adults will soon be lurking among the leaves of trees and shrubs in Ohio in search of prey.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Invasive Species Success stone.91 Tue, 07/10/2018 - 07:02

 

In recent years you have likely read more, learned more and maybe even seen more invasive species. Whether it is plants, diseases or insects, these pests should be on the radar - especially in the green industry. 

 

I was recently reading a local paper and the headline "Border authorities find invasive beetles in a bag of seeds" of course caught my attention. The invasive species encounter was success thanks to the work of US Customs and Border Protection.

 

Late last week, US Customs and Border Protection announced in a release that agriculture...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Honeysuckle Leaf Blight chatfield.1 Mon, 07/09/2018 - 12:50
Honeysuckle leaf blight is a common, sometimes heavier than other times, non-killing fungal disease of crabapples. Many are noticing it this season.
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Joe Boggs

Sand Wasp Enemy of Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs

I'm interested in observations about cicada killer wasps this season [see "No Killers in Sight as Dog-Day Cicadas Sing," July 6, 2018]. So, when Jeff Webeler (White Oak Gardens, Cincinnati) e-mailed this past Friday about a large numbers of wasps digging in sand backfill behind a retaining wall, I drove at more or less the speed limit to visit the site.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Asiatic vs. Oriental Lilies... Same Plants or Different? draper.15 Fri, 07/06/2018 - 21:10

I marveled at the incredible display of blooms and colors on the patch of lilies that I could see as I looked out from the deck over the Drapescape.  Because of the intense colors, I just had to go get my camera and take some pictures.  As I started reflecting on the names of these plants, I realized that I had to label the pictures and two names started to flip back and forth in my mind; namely, Asiatic or Oriental or are these colloquial terms or are these actually one in the same for one plant or were the plants different?  What scary thoughts for a woody plant...

Published on
Authors
Erik Draper
No Killers in Sight as Dog-Day Cicadas Sing boggs.47 Fri, 07/06/2018 - 09:46
Annual Dog-Day Cicadas are singing throughout much of Ohio. Normally this means their nemesis, Cicada Killer Wasps would be seen cruising woodlands and landscapes in search of their exclusive prey. However, I have yet to see a wasp. Could wet spring soil conditions have reduced their numbers?
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Fluffy Flatids boggs.47 Thu, 07/05/2018 - 18:11
Clusters of fluffy, white flatid planthopper nymphs are appearing on the stems and leaves of low growing plants in southwest Ohio. The planthoppers are most commonly found in woodlands, but will occasionally creep up the stems of plants in landscapes as well as vegetable gardens.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Magnolias Drawing Flies boggs.47 Thu, 07/05/2018 - 09:24
I received an e-mail Tuesday from a homeowner asking why there are a large number of flies buzzing around their magnolia. I sent them a picture of Magnolia Scale and told them to look for this insect on the twigs and branches. They responded that they had seen the scale, but thought it was a normal part of the tree. Sneaky scales!
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Follow up on winter injury to roses bennett.27 Tue, 07/03/2018 - 05:14

Back in the spring, I wrote a BYGL alert about winter injury to roses.  THANKS to everyone for their feedback and response as to what's being seen around the state.  It seems that the general consensus is that all types of roses experienced major dieback with damage clear down to around four to six inches above the graft.  Some lost a few roses completely but the majority of the roses have recovered nicely according to most.  Winter injury reports came from all around Ohio as well as from Detroit.

 

It still drives me crazy to drive around town and see the old dead wood...

Published on
Authors
Pam Bennett
Night Raiders boggs.47 Mon, 07/02/2018 - 09:50
It's often impossible to identify the insect culprit responsible for causing holes or jagged margins on tree leaves if the perpetrator has left the scene. Unless there is a clear association between the tree species and a pest, we rely on dubious "it could be" speculation to solve a bit-and-run.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Sedum Erratum boggs.47 Sat, 06/30/2018 - 12:00
I posted a BYGL Alert this past Tuesday about an unidentified flea beetle attacking sedum in Ohio [see "Sedum Conundrum and Passionate Plea," June 26]. I called the beetle the "Sedum Flea Beetle" in my report.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Lovely American Lotus boggs.47 Fri, 06/29/2018 - 19:41
American lotus (Nelumbo lutea) is one of my favorite native wildflowers. In my opinion, there is nothing else that rises from our waters to rival the allure of this aquatic beauty; except perhaps for walleye and largemouth bass.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Head Clipper Attacks Cone Heads boggs.47 Thu, 06/28/2018 - 20:26
Participants in today's OSU Extension, Hamilton County, Master Gardner Volunteers Diagnostic Walk-About at Glenwood Gardens were treated to the handiwork of the Sunflower Headclipping Weevil on purple coneflower. The damage included dangling seed heads and stems that looked like soda straws.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Cedar-Quince Rust on Callery Pear

We reported on cedar-quince rust on hawthorns in a BYGL Alert! a couple of weeks ago [see "Rusty Hawthorns," June 14]. The disease is so common on hawthorns it's become an annual BYGL missive. However, we were surprised by recent observations of cedar-quince rust occurring on Callery pear.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Jim Chatfield
Ohio Arbovirus Surveillance Updates andon.1 Wed, 06/27/2018 - 15:15

Beginning this year, the Ohio Arbovirus (arthropod-borne virus) Surveillance Update can be found on the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) website at http://www.odh.ohio.gov/arboupdate.  The table will be updated each Monday through mosquito season.

Mosquito season is here.  The ODH Zoonotic Disease Program, in partnership with ODH Laboratory, local public health partners and sanitary district partners, collects and tests mosquitoes from many communities in Ohio as part of statewide mosquito-borne disease surveillance...

Published on
Authors
Jennifer Andon
Check Out Some Educational Opportunities stone.91 Wed, 06/27/2018 - 13:53
The OSU Woodland Stewards Program offers educational workshops, programs and tours throughout the year. The classes are always listed on their website, but here is a special shout out for three programs you don't want to miss.
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Sedum Conundrum and Passionate Plea boggs.47 Tue, 06/26/2018 - 18:08
In early October, 2011, I received a phone call from a homeowner in eastern Cincinnati who said brightly colored beetles were destroying her Sedum x 'Autumn Joy' (family Crassulaceae). I visited and found that a flea beetle that I'd never seen before was doing so much damage it was hard to identify the plants.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Some Gypsy Moth Caterpillars Have Met Their Match stone.91 Mon, 06/25/2018 - 15:57

 

While there has been an increase of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) sightings in northwest Ohio, specifically in Lucas and Fulton Counties, late last week some of the leaf eating caterpillars appeared to be dying. Upon closer inspection, it appears that entomophaga (Entomophaga maimaiga), or the gypsy moth fungus, is doing the trick.

 

Gypsy moth caterpillars killed by the fungus entomophaga typically die hanging vertically from the tree trunks with their prolegs stretched out laterally. Caterpillar appear to shrink in girth and become somewhat...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Pinecones on Willow? They're Baaack! boggs.47 Mon, 06/25/2018 - 11:58
Willow Pinecone Galls are one of the most unusual galls found in Ohio; I post a BYGL Alert! about them every year. Maybe more than one to spread the gall-joy! The galls are created by the Willow Pinecone Gall Midge to house, nourish, and protect a single fly larva (maggot) located deep within the gall. The literature lists a number of willow hosts; however, I've only ever found them on black willow.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Burgeoning Beetles boggs.47 Fri, 06/22/2018 - 18:30
I'm seeing large numbers of Japanese Beetles (Popillia japonica) in southwest Ohio. Compared to previous seasons, the beetles appear to be more evenly distributed; they are not hard to find. I'm hearing similar reports from the central part of the state.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Families- A Grouping or Gathering of Similar Plants draper.15 Fri, 06/22/2018 - 10:22
Have you ever thought “why in the world should I care about plant families?” Or why does it matter if a plant belongs to a certain family?  What if you were asked, “Can my Pyracantha (firethorn) shrubs get fireblight?”  or “What other plants could be possible target hosts for the Emerald Ash Borer”?  You will be able to understand the answers to these questions, IF YOU UNDERSTAND THE IMPACT OF PLANT FAMILIES! 
Published on
Authors
Erik Draper
Jim Chatfield
Twisted Tale of Dodder boggs.47 Thu, 06/21/2018 - 16:29
Dodders are parasitic plants belonging to the morning glory family, Convolvulaceae. They were formerly placed in the dodder family, Cuscutaceae, with only one genus in the family, Cuscuta. Depending on the reference, there are somewhere between 100 – 170 species worldwide with 13 species found in Ohio.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
More Lace Bugs boggs.47 Tue, 06/19/2018 - 16:44
Lace bugs do well during hot weather and they are certainly doing very well. I'm finding population densities and levels of damage that are normally seen in July. I posted a report on hawthorn lace bugs this past Saturday; this report highlights a few others.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
A Most Beautiful Beetle boggs.47 Mon, 06/18/2018 - 10:04
This is the time of the year when a close look at dogbane may reveal Dogbane Beetles; one of the most beautiful beetles found in Ohio. Indeed, the beetle's scientific name, Chrysochus auratus, loosely translates to "made of gold." This native beetle should be familiar to BYGL readers; it's one of my favorite insects and I post at least one report about it each year!
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
National Pollinator Week Begins Today stone.91 Sun, 06/17/2018 - 23:13

The Pollinator Partnership is proud to announce that June 18-24, 2018 has been designated National Pollinator Week. This week long observation is a time to celebrate pollinators and spread the word about what can be done to protect them.

 

Eleven years ago the U.S. Senate’s unanimous approval and designation of a week in June as “National Pollinator Week” marked a necessary step toward addressing the urgent issue of declining pollinator populations. Pollinator Week has now grown into an international celebration of the valuable ecosystem services provided...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Hawthorn Lace Bugs Affect More Than Hawthorns boggs.47 Sat, 06/16/2018 - 11:22
The characteristic leaf "stippling" symptoms produced by Hawthorn Lace Bugs is now very noticeable in southwest Ohio. Lace bugs are tiny insects with the adults measuring no more than 3/16" long. They are so-named because of the lace-like pattern of veins and membranes in their wings.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Sneaky Bagworms boggs.47 Fri, 06/15/2018 - 17:56
I'm not yet saying this is going to be a banner season for Common Bagworms. However, I'm commonly finding bagworms in southwest Ohio without much effort. I've not heard reports from elsewhere in the state
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Scarlet Oak Sawfly Damage is Underway boggs.47 Fri, 06/15/2018 - 11:31
First generation scarlet oak sawfly larvae are beginning to skeletonize oak leaves in southwest Ohio. The larvae are currently in the 1st and 2nd instar stages and a little less than 1/8" long. Despite this sawfly's common name, larvae may be found feeding on a wide range of oaks including pin, black, red, and white oaks as well as its namesake oak.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Diagnosis: Bird...Or chatfield.1 Thu, 06/14/2018 - 23:22
Is it a birds-nest or is it something else? Birds-nest fungi are fascinating organisms, complete with little nest-like spore casings that act as splash cups, and peridioles complete with funicular cords. Oh, what wonders.
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Paul Snyder
Rusty Hawthorns boggs.47 Thu, 06/14/2018 - 15:58
This is the time of the year when rust diseases make it easy to spot wild hawthorns growing along Ohio trails as well as in landscapes. They have orange spotted leaves and "orange-hairy haws." I may be exaggerating a bit, but these rust symptoms can certainly make woodland hikes interesting.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Masked Chafers and Japanese Beetles are on the Wing boggs.47 Thu, 06/14/2018 - 13:42
Northern Masked Chafers and Japanese Beetles are on the wing in southern Ohio. These scarabs (family Scarabaeidae) are two of the three most common "white grub producing" beetles found beneath turfgrass in Ohio. The third potential participant in the grub-party are Southern Masked Chafers which have not yet appeared on the scene.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
ODA Announces Gypsy Moth Mating Disruption Treatment stone.91 Wed, 06/13/2018 - 22:52

 

The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) recently announced plans to begin aerial treatments designed to disrupt gypsy moth mating later this summer. Treatments will be applied to 32,526 acres in fifteen counties across the state. 
 

The gypsy moth is a non-native, invasive species that feeds on the leaves of more than 300 different trees and shrubs and is especially fond of oak as a caterpillar as shown below.

 

...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Marginal Leaf Fold Galls on Oaks and Black Locust boggs.47 Wed, 06/13/2018 - 15:32
A couple of weeks ago, me and several of my Extension colleagues came across so-called marginal leaf fold galls on an oak on the OSU campus during a photography workshop. Since that time, I'm commonly finding these galls on oaks belonging to the "red oak group" as well as a similar gall on black locust in southwest Ohio.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Perceived Willow Woes boggs.47 Mon, 06/11/2018 - 20:09
I'm an unabashed fan of willows. Of course, no tree is perfect and willows have a few pests. Thankfully, the depth of their vital spark means willows are capable of handling the depredations of most pests. However, the pests I'm highlighting can make trees look bad.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Ghosts in the Mist Thistle

Canada Thistle in southwest Ohio is starting to show the "ghostly" white symptoms of bacterial infections. The tops of infected plants look like they were dipped in bleach. The bacterium produces a chemical called tagetitoxin which is a RNA polymerase III inhibitor that blocks the production of chloroplasts.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Really MOOOving Along in NE Ohio

Driving along in Northeast Ohio, I came around a bend in the road and saw some tall weeds with clusters of white flowers in the roadside ditch.  The flower heads had the classic shape of the Apiaceae or carrot family with the typical “compound umbels” on display.  Think of an upside down umbrella with all the flower clusters radiating upward from a single point end of the stalk to form a flattened flower head about 6-10” across.  So, I just had to stop and look at these plants knowing the concern that they will incite when people panic because they think they are seeing...

Published on
Authors
Erik Draper

Mystery Nest? Don't call 911 just yet!

Last week, a local police officer was called out to a property for mysterious “bug” activity.  An unusual nest was reported on the property and the concerned homeowners did not know what it was or what to do with it.  Luckily, the officer knew to call their local Extension office and soon we were ON THE CASE!  (Here come the sleuthing puns!)

 


mystery nest...

Published on
Authors
Ashley Kulhanek
Marne Titchenell

Four-lined Plant Bug Crushing Oregano (and other plants)

Perennial plants (and others) are showing damage caused by four-lined plant bug (Poecilocapus lineatus) with some plants exhibiting heavy damage.  For instance, my oregano is totally obliterated.  I usually say no worries to this pest as it is a one and done insect; it has one life cycle in the early part of spring.  The damage is caused early enough in the season that I don't usually worry about taking action with pesticides.  However, this year is anything but normal and I am altering my normal approach a bit.

...
Published on
Authors
Pam Bennett

Wolves in Sheep's Clothing

Julie Crook and I visited a magnolia in her landscape on Tuesday that is infested with Magnolia Scale. We had intended to evaluate a soft scale control method using dish scrubbers to physically remove the scales. I learned about this scale suppression technique from Dan Potter (University of Kentucky Entomology).
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Julie Crook

Seeing Red

I'm continuing to get reports of huge numbers of tiny, fast-moving bright red mites scurrying around on sunny surfaces such as on picnic tables, patios, sidewalks, concrete retaining walls, and on the outside walls of homes and buildings. These nuisance mites are sometimes called "concrete mites" owing to locations where they tend to congregate
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Calico Scale-Crawl

Calico scale eggs located beneath helmet-shaped females are hatching in southwest Ohio and the 1st instar nymphs (crawlers) are on the move. Unlike armored scales, all nymphal stages of this soft scale are mobile, so nymphs can be called "crawlers" throughout their development
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Bagworm Alert!

Overwintered Common Bagworm eggs are hatching in southwest Ohio. The tiny 1st instar bags are constructed with pieces of tan to reddish-brown sawdust-like frass (excrement) stuck to the outside of silk and look like "dunce caps."
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Asian Chestnut Gall Wasp

The Asian Chestnut Gall Wasp was introduced to North America in 1974 on imported chestnut cuttings. To date it has be identified in Georgia, Alabama, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, Tennessee and Ohio.
Published on
Authors
Carri Jagger

Soil Temps Determine Planting Time

One of the most often asked vegetable questions during this early season is “How soon can I plant my tomatoes and peppers in the garden?”  There are two reasons that the northeast Ohio gardener’s rule of thumb is “wait for Memorial Day” before planting out the tender annuals like tomatoes, peppers and green beans.  The first reason is the possibility of a frost is almost eliminated by waiting until Memorial Day.  Those tender annual plants like squash, tomatoes, green beans and peppers, cannot tolerate a frost event or even lower temperatures at all!...

Published on
Authors
Erik Draper
Volutella leaf blight and stem canker of pachysandra chatfield.1 Sun, 05/20/2018 - 10:44
Volutella leaf blight and stem canker on pachysandra is a significant problem in landscapes this Spring. When serious, this disease may call for a renovation of the bed, including mowing, debris removal, and consideration of protective fungicides.
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield

What's Your Number - Growing Degree Day Accumulations

 

This time of the year, some areas can be accumulating growing degree days (GDD) pretty rapidly, while in other areas it is a slower process. Joe Boggs reported to some ENLTers last week that the Cincinnati area broke a record and experienced a 90 degree day. It's truly a different story in Toledo. We have been on the receiving end of lots of rain and much cooler temperatures. There have been some days where our low and high temperatures added together didn't add up to 90. 

 

To illustrate the differences that are occurring in the buckeye state, I have looked at...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

Invasive of the Week - Autumn Olive

 

I was walking today and came upon a sweet smell. Excitement built as the fragrance intensified only to be disappointed. The fragrance was a familiar spring scent that I only remembered when I saw the plant. Its white to light yellow flowers hung against its silvery green foliage - yes you guess it - autumn olive (Elaeagnus umbellata). This deciduous plant can be consider a small tree or shrub. The stem, buds and leaves are covered with scales that are silver in color. 

 

...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

Wildflowers of Spring

Like other plants, wildflowers bided their time in Spring this year. In recent weeks, though, the display was wondrous. From bloodroot to trillium, to the luck of the bluets, woodland flowers are ever magical.
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Fothergilla Flowers: What Are We Looking At? chatfield.1 Fri, 05/18/2018 - 09:03
Fothergilla flowers are showing us stamens, white filaments topped with pollen-bearing anthers. The female pistils are lower on the flower stalk, not in the same blossom, thus these are monoecious rather than perfect flowers. There are no petals. Our horticultural fothergillas are hybrids of two native species.
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Unheavenly Ambrosia Beetles boggs.47 Thu, 05/17/2018 - 14:53
I've received a number of reports recently from landscape managers and arborists of thin cylindrical strands of white sawdust appearing to ooze out of small holes in the trunks of recently planted trees. These delicate, odd looking structures are sometimes called "frass toothpicks" and are the calling card of Ambrosia Beetles. They also indicate trees are in serious, irreversible trouble.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Name These Flowers chatfield.1 Thu, 05/17/2018 - 00:42
Have you ever experienced this - noticing something for the first time, yet realizing that you must have seen it for years without realizing it was there. That was the experience of a group of plant lovers earlier this spring. Oh, my, what we were missing. Beautiful red flowers, unfamiliar, on a familiar tree.
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Erik Draper
Oystershell Scale Eggs Are Hatching! boggs.47 Wed, 05/16/2018 - 18:44
The overwintered eggs of Oystershell Scale are hatching in Ohio with first instar nymphs (crawlers) afoot in the southwest and northwest parts of the state. This is a critical event because the mobile crawlers are susceptible to a number of control options that are not effective against other scale developmental stages.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Beth Scheckelhoff
Words of Wisdom chatfield.1 Wed, 05/16/2018 - 08:45
There are many lessons of Nature to be learned from the words of others. Though Shakespeare intoned: "In Nature's infinite book of secrecy a little I can read", even that little may be most wondrous.
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Woody of the Week - Ohio Buckeye stone.91 Tue, 05/15/2018 - 16:41

The Ohio buckeye (Aesculus glabra) is the state tree of Ohio. It is a native tree to the midwestern and plain states. The tree can reach 60 feet tall and 30 feet wide in an open area, but is about 1/2 that size when growing in an understory or shaded location. 

 

The Ohio buckeye prefers a moist but well drained site. It can adapt to drier sites, but will often exhibit some leaf scorch when conditions are too dry.  It is also susceptible to a leaf blotch and powdery mildew when conditions are right. 

 

The leaves are arranged opposite of each other...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

Woody of the Week - Pawpaw

Pawpaw (Asimina triloba) is found throughout the buckeye state and most of the Eastern United States. It grows naturally as an understory tree or along woodland edges, and is often found in areas that are moist.

 

A single tree can sometimes become a "pawpaw-colony" through root sprouts from the parent plant. The mature height of this tree is 25 feet and the mature spread is 15 feet, when not crowded by other plants. The leaves are rather large giving the plant a tropical feel. 

 

While the plant is noted for its fruit, the flowers are beautiful but...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

Ant Wars

I opened my garage door this morning to find a seething mass of Pavement Ants roiling around the expansion joint where the driveway meets the garage. This was not an "ant swarm" where large numbers of winged ants (alates) emerge to fly off and mate; it was a full-blown, no-holds-bared ant war
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Crabmania 2018

Crabapple bloom was at its best in Ohio this year. Prolonged in southern Ohio, but compressed but spectacular and late in central and northern Ohio. Check out a few highlights here.
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Mosquito Alert boggs.47 Mon, 05/14/2018 - 13:17
Residual pools of standing water left from above average rainfall throughout much of Ohio this spring certainly benefitted mosquitoes. Although our cooler than normal spring temperatures may have delayed the onset of "mosquito season" a bit, our current above average temperatures will put mosquito development into hyperdrive.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Roses Knocked Back by Winter Cold bennett.27 Fri, 05/11/2018 - 09:37

Several types of roses in Central and Southern (confirmed by Joe Boggs) were knocked back pretty good by cold winter weather.  While trimming my shrub and carpet-type roses in early April I noticed quite a bit of dead wood.  I had to really trim them back to a height of about six inches.  They are looking great right now as the new growth is vigorous.  I completely lost one climbing rose and another one was killed back to the crown.  The new growth on this one is coming from the root stock.

...
Published on
Authors
Pam Bennett
Night-Flying Bumbling Buzz-Bombing Beetles. boggs.47 Thu, 05/10/2018 - 19:33
The familiar "bzzzzzzz...thud!" sound made by May/June Beetles as they fly around porch lights at night and bounce off walls, doors, windows, startled homeowners, etc., is now being heard in southwest Ohio.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Butterweed / Cressleaf Groundsel: Beauty is in the Eye of the Beholder boggs.47 Wed, 05/09/2018 - 12:07
The dichotomous nature of Butterweed may test the tolerance of lovers of native wildflowers. On one hand, a sea of yellow flowers carpeting farm fields flanking Ohio's interstates in the spring provides welcome relief from highway monotony. On the other hand, upright 2 – 3' tall plants bolting seemingly out of nowhere in Ohio landscapes presents a weed management challenge.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
ODA Will Begin Treating for Gypsy Moth in Ohio stone.91 Wed, 05/09/2018 - 11:44

 

The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) will soon begin aerial treatments designed to manage gypsy moth populations in Ohio. One management option includes treating young caterpillars in the spring. Counties where these treatments will be applied to designated blocks include:

 

  • Franklin
  • Fulton
  • Hocking
  • Lucas
  • Marion
  • Morrow
  • Perry
  • Ross
  • Sandusky
  • Seneca
  • Vinton
  • Wyandot

 

The treatments aimed at the larval stage will begin early to mid-...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Look Up Before Parking Under Honeylocust Trees … and Elms, Hawthorns, Sweetgum, Zelkova … boggs.47 Tue, 05/08/2018 - 08:39
We have a shopping center and hospital not far from my home in southwest Ohio that have parking lot tree planters with honeylocusts, lacebark elms, and a number of other types of trees. The trees provide shade, so they are car magnets. Unfortunately, a considerable number of the trees are heavily infested with Calico Scale.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Boxwoods Go Snap, Crackle, and Pop! boggs.47 Sat, 05/05/2018 - 11:18
I've already posted a BYGL Alert on Boxwood Leafminer this season that described its life-cycle, detection, and management. However, I only briefly described one of the most notable side effects associated with this non-native midge fly: odd rustling or popping sounds radiating from heavily infested boxwoods.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Curtis E. Young
Wilting Buckeyes boggs.47 Fri, 05/04/2018 - 11:48
The handiwork of the Buckeye Petiole Borer is now becoming evident on its namesake host in southern Ohio. Individual caterpillars of this tiny native moth bore into leaf petioles to disrupt vascular flow causing leaves to droop, wilt, and turn dark green to black. Damaged leaves will eventually detach producing mild defoliation. Symptoms may superficially resemble frost or freeze damage.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Horned Oak Galls "Pop" boggs.47 Thu, 05/03/2018 - 16:29
The physical emergence of the "horns" that give horned oak galls their common name is such a short-lived event I've only witnessed it one other time in 26 years. I've commonly observed fully extended horns, but seeing them in the process of breaking through the gall surface is a rare treat and it's happening right now in southwest Ohio.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Elm Flea Weevils Emerge: True Culprit Unmasked boggs.47 Tue, 05/01/2018 - 17:39
Long known as the European Elm Flea weevil (Orchestes alni), this non-native was thought to be wreaking havoc on elms in the U.S. since the early 2000s. However, recent research has revealed this species does not occur in the U.S. The true culprit is another non-native weevil.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Mining Bees on the Wing

There are many species of bees that create individual (solitary) burrows in the soil. Several hymenopteran families are represented including Andrenidae (Mining Bees), Apidae (Tribe Anthophorini (Digger Bees)), and Colletidae which are called cellophane bees owing to the waterproof plastic-like material they use to line their soil burrows. They all have one thing in common: they are important pollinators.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Tigers on the Prowl

I spotted one of my favorite insect predators darting about on forest trails yesterday: Six-Spotted Tiger Beetles. Their common name is well justified as these tiny "tigers" hunt, kill, and eat other insects. They are equipped with huge eyes for excellent eyesight, long legs for agile speed, and huge mandibles for grabbing prey.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Browned Boxwoods boggs.47 Fri, 04/13/2018 - 14:12
Boxwoods with light brown to golden brown leaves are common this spring in Greater Cincinnati. Some of the leaf browning is due to winter injury; some was caused by salt damage. However, a close examination may also reveal the telltale blister-like leaf symptoms caused by the boxwood leafminer.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Watch Your ASH!

Now that the Emerald Ash Borer has infested Lake County, Ohio, many Green Ash trees in the landscape and forest woodlots have died. But the real danger is right overhead. With dead trees and wind combined, it can be a costly and deadly combination. A tree that shows severe infestation will die within the year. The danger is these trees soon become a fall hazard and need to be removed before injury or property damage occurs.
Published on
Authors
Thomas deHaas

They're Baaack!

Last Friday, Larry Parker (Cincinnati Parks) sent to me the images below of Boxelder Bugs (Boisea trivittata, order Hemiptera) hanging out on a park's building. 'Tis the season.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Managing Crabgrass in Turf bennett.27 Mon, 04/09/2018 - 11:46
With these rains the lawn is beginning to grow and the weeds are not far behind.  Some of the earliest emerging broadleaf weeds have begun to emerge.  The biggest problem with weeds in turfgrass is reduced aesthetic value, although some weeds can out compete turfgrass when management is reduced.  Smooth and large crabgrass, yellow foxtail, and annual bluegrass are the most frequent annual grass weeds in turfgrass.
Published on
Authors
Jeff Stachler
Purple Haze All in My Eyes boggs.47 Fri, 04/06/2018 - 16:26
Driving south on I-71 on Wednesday, I was mesmerized by a deep purple veil creeping across fields like smoke on the water. The purple haze, all in my eyes, made me wanna drive 'til I ran out of highway into the purple sky.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Cold Weather Offers an Extension on Poison Hemlock Management boggs.47 Mon, 04/02/2018 - 16:41
Our slowly developing spring is a real boon to us procrastinators. If you exercise caution by performing a close inspection of what lies beneath, there may still be time to make a non-selective herbicide application to control Poison Hemlock without wiping out preferred plants that have not yet sprung for spring.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Eastern Tent Cats Hatch boggs.47 Fri, 03/30/2018 - 19:18
Astronomical spring is marked by the vernal equinox. I mark "entomological spring" when overwintered Eastern Tent Caterpillar (ETC) moth eggs hatch. That's why I always collect a few egg masses in late winter and hold them outside (in the shade) so I can monitor for this supernal event. It began happening today at around 12:00 p.m.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) Eradication Program in Ohio Scores a "Win" boggs.47 Fri, 03/16/2018 - 10:42
Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) is potentially the most devastating non-native pest to have ever arrived in North America. The beetle kills trees belonging to 12 genera in 9 plant families. This includes all native maples, a preferred host. Successful eradication is essential to avoiding a catastrophic loss of trees on a scale never before seen in the U.S.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Burrowing Crayfish Rise boggs.47 Wed, 03/07/2018 - 14:03
The rise of "mud chimneys" produced by Burrowing Crayfish has long been one of my favorite harbingers of spring. I've recently observed several of these mud edifices peaking just above turfgrass in southwest Ohio. While none had yet reached catastrophic lawn mower blade-bending size; spring is definitely in the air.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Act Now to Manage White Pine Weevil boggs.47 Wed, 03/07/2018 - 11:22
White Pine Weevil is one of our sneakiest conifer pests found in Ohio. Females spend the winter out of sight cooling their six heels in the duff beneath their pine or spruce targets. As temperatures warm in the spring, they climb their hosts to feed and lay eggs in the terminals. Sap oozing from small holes in the terminals is a calling card of this weevil.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Distinctive Dogwoods Demand Discernment dehaas.2 Mon, 03/05/2018 - 13:56
Red twig or yellow twig dogwood! Who knew? When people think of dogwoods, they typically think of flowering dogwood or maybe Chinese dogwood. However, there is a whole world of dogwoods specifically selected for their twig color in the winter. Against the snow as a backdrop, they can be stunning.
Published on
Authors
Thomas deHaas

Invasive Plants Regulated in Ohio

Here is a look back to look forward as it relates to invasive plants in Ohio and new rules effective January 7, 2018 -

 

In September of 2014, the Ohio General Assembly granted the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) the exclusive authority to regulate invasive plants species. Under the law invasive plants are defined as plant species that are not native to Ohio whose introduction causes or is likely to cause economic or environmental harm, or harm to human health as determined by scientific studies.

 

...
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Invasive Species Awareness Week - ORIENTAL BITTERSWEET - Invasive Species of the Day stone.91 Sat, 03/03/2018 - 10:39

Sometimes referred to as the "kudzu of the north", oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus) is a non-native species that continues to grow and spread in Ohio. The vine is popping up in our woods, fence rows, landscapes and places in between.

 

It is important to know that we do have American bittersweet (Celastrus scandens). It has more elliptical shaped leaves, rather than the rounded of the Oriental bittersweet. American bittersweet can also be distinguished from Oriental bittersweet by its leaves when they are just beginning to emerge from...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
National Invasive Species Awareness Week - GYPSY MOTH - Invasive Species of the Day stone.91 Wed, 02/28/2018 - 12:15

We are going way back in time for this invasive species during the 2018 National Invasive Species Awareness Week. 

 

In the 1860's a French artist and amateur entomologist, Leopold Trouvelot, brought the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) to North America for what he thought was a good reason. He hoped to use the gypsy moth as the foundation for a silk industry in the United States. The "silk threads" of the gypsy moth did not prove to be a reliable source, and unfortunately the insect escaped Trouvelot’s Boston home-laboratory. 

 

The gyspy moth was ...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
National Invasive Species Awareness Week - Japanese Knotweed - Invasive Species of the Day kulhanek.5 Tue, 02/27/2018 - 17:13

I have noticed Japanese Knotweed (I've seen it listed as: Polygonum cuspidatum or Fallopia japonica or Reynoutria japonica) around the county the last few summers, so I chose it as Tuesday's  INVASIVE of the DAY for National Invasive Plant Awareness Week.

Japanese knotweed is a non-native erect, semi-woody perennial that can grow up to and likely beyond 10 feet tall and create dense stands when unchecked.  It was introduced, as so many invasives were, as an ornamental in the late 1800's and soon escaped the garden-scape and found its way into disturbed...

Published on
Authors
Ashley Kulhanek
Wonderful Witchhazels Welcome Warmer Weather dehaas.2 Tue, 02/27/2018 - 15:22
Witchhazels….the forgotten wonder! The flowers are so small and dainty; you could miss them. However, the fragrance is heavenly. Which is why designers, landscapers and homeowner should put them close to an entryway or high traffic area. Since witchhazels flower anytime between mid-February through March, they can easily be missed.
Published on
Authors
Thomas deHaas
Silver Maples Blooming Away kulhanek.5 Tue, 02/27/2018 - 15:10

The Silver Maples, Acer saccharinum, in my neck of the woods are blooming.  February or not... feels like "spring" to me!

 

silver maple in bloom

 

 

Silver Maple trees are among the first to bloom in Ohio clocking in at 34 growing degree days (GDD) for first bloom and 42 GDD for full bloom.  I caught these photos at 51 GDD.  You can check your own location by visiting the OSU Phenology...

Published on
Authors
Ashley Kulhanek
As Temperatures Warm, Don't Forget Growing Degree Days stone.91 Mon, 02/26/2018 - 16:29

 

A recorded breaking warm-up last week is just a distant memory, although continued flooding in certain areas of Ohio is a reminder that precipitation fell as rain and not as snow. While temperatures felt a little bit more winter-like over the weekend, another warm up is on its way. Even though we are still in February, it is not too earlier to begin following the Growing Degree Day Calendar online at https://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/gdd/

 

 

...
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
National Invasive Species Awareness Week - KUDZU - Invasive Species of the Day stone.91 Mon, 02/26/2018 - 15:52
If you have traveled down south, you have probably encountered kudzu along the way. This non-native aggressive vine grows up and over anything in its way and just keeps growing and growing and growing. Think of it as the Energizer Bunny in plant form! 
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Next Week is National Invasive Species Awareness Week stone.91 Thu, 02/22/2018 - 12:06
It is on your calendar? Are your "celebration" plans in place? For what you may ask.  Next week, February 26 - March 2, 2018 is the National Invasive Species Awareness Week.
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Hemlock Woolly Adelgid in Lake and Geauga County, Ohio dehaas.2 Thu, 02/08/2018 - 13:27
Hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae, is an invasive insect in eastern North America. It feeds on Canadian Hemlock, Tsuga Canadensis. The insect was discovered last summer feeding on a mature stand of Hemlocks on Little Mountain on a property located on the grounds of Holden Arboretum. Although it is uncertain how the adelgid got there, it is thought that it arrived on birds migrating north. Because of the discovery, both counties have been quarantined. Canadian Hemlocks grown in nurseries located in Lake and/or Geauga County, Ohio will have special requirements and restrictions on movement...
Published on
Authors
Thomas deHaas
Spotted Lanternfly Found in Virginia stone.91 Wed, 01/31/2018 - 04:54

The spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) was recently detected in Frederick County, Virginia on January 10, 2018. It has been reported that egg masses and a dead adult were found.

 

The spotted lanternfly, an invasive planthopper, was first discovered in the United States in Pennsylvania in the fall of 2014. It is native to China, India, Vietnam, and introduced to Korea where it has become a major pest. This insect has the potential to greatly impact the grape, hops and logging industries. In November of 2017 a single female was found in New Castle County...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Non-Native Stinging Ant Confirmed in Southwest Ohio boggs.47 Fri, 01/26/2018 - 12:53
Ant specimens collected in mid-November in southwest Ohio were confirmed by the USDA, APHIS to be Asian Needle Ants. This is not the first report of this ant being found in the U.S. However, it is the first confirmation of this non-native stinging ant being found in Ohio.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

ODA Announces 2018 Gypsy Moth Treatment Project Open Houses

While all is quite in the gypsy moth's world, much preparation is occurring in Ohio to manage future gypsy moth populations this year as part of the two programs ODA administers:  Slow-The-Spread and Suppression.  Recently ODA released the schedule for their 2018 Gypsy Moth Treatment Open Houses and the 2018 Treatment Maps. Treatment blocks have been identified and are planned in19 Ohio Counties. Treatments will occur after caterpillars hatch this spring and when weather conditions are favorable.  Treatments are made to protect trees from damage from the leaf feeding caterpillars like seen...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

USDA Updates Emerald Ash Borer Map, January 2018

While emerald ash borer (EAB) may be considered "old-news" in the buckeye state, many may want to keep a watchful eye on its progression beyond Ohio. Each month, USDA APHIS produces an updated EAB Detection Map. Occasionally, we like to post these updated maps on BYGL for those that are interested in monitoring the spread of the pest in North America. 

 

The most recent additions to the map include:

  • initial county detections in: St. Clair and Talladega Counties, Alabama; Queens County, New York; and Eau...
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

ODA Announces New Finds of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid in Ohio in Athens, Geauga and Lake Counties

Earlier today, the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) the Ohio Department of Natural Resources(ODNR) announced the discovery of a hemlock-killing pest in Lake, Geauga and Athens counties. The hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) is a small, aphid-like insect native to Asia, which threatens the health and sustainability of two hemlock tree species native to the eastern United States.

 

HWA was first reported in the eastern United States in 1951 near Richmond, Virginia. Today, it is established in portions of 20 states from...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

Emerald Ash Borer University - 2018

Emerald Ash Borer University (EABU) recently released the dates and topics of its upcoming "virtual semester." Five FREE webinars are scheduled in February and March. Each session will last approximately one hour. A certificate of participation can be emailed to those participating on the live webinars. All sessions will be recorded and linked to the National EAB Website at www.emeraldashborer.info following the session using YouTube.

 

EABU is a free webinar series supported through the US Forest Service and coordinated by...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Honeylocusts and Mastodons boggs.47 Tue, 01/02/2018 - 15:29
This is a great time of the year to slow down, sit down, and contemplate answers to big questions. Like, what do honeylocusts and pronghorns have in common? Why do Osage orange trees, Kentucky coffeetrees, and avocado trees have such large seed packages? In all cases, what we see now was shaped by animals that no longer exist; they are extinct.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

USDA Posts New Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) Newsletter

Earlier today (12/29/2017), the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) posted an eNewsletter designed to keep everyone up-to-date with Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) eradication efforts in the US. While some BYGL readers might receive the eNewsletter directly from USDA, we wanted to make sure as many people are in the "ALB-know" as possible. 

 

Presently, there are active eradication programs operating in three states including New York, Massachusetts and Ohio.

 

While information on eradication efforts in each state is valuable to follow and stay up-...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

That May Not Be Snow on Those Alders!

BYGL reports become sparse at this time of the year with cold temperatures suppressing our subject matter. So, I was surprised last Thursday when I got an e-mail from John Martini, University of Cincinnati's Landscape Architect, with an image taken by UC Planner Joe Willging showing collections of white fluffy material on the branches of an alder (Alnus sp.).
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Scouting for Scale at Snowy Solstice dehaas.2 Wed, 12/20/2017 - 09:06

Scouting for scale in the Winter is great use of your time. 

Scale comes in many shapes, sizes and varieties. Last year we saw Oyster Shell, Calico, Juniper, Greedy, Bamboo, Fletcher, Japanese maple, Pine Needle, Brown, Putnam, Euonymus and Magnolia Scale.

Scale is sometimes hard to see when a plant is in full foliage. But in the winter with no leaves on trees and shrubs, except evergreen, scale are easier to see.

Scouting scale in the winter makes sense because there is less to care for outside in the landscape. The following pictures are Scale images on the...

Published on
Authors
Thomas deHaas

Ohio Turfgrass Foundation (OTF) Conference and Tradeshow and OSU Green Industry Short Course

Looking to earn your recertification credits before the end of the year?  The Ohio Turfgrass Foundation Conference and Tradeshow and the Ohio State University Green Industry Short Course is a great educational opportunity. 

 

The conference is December 5 - 7, 2017 in Columbus at the Convention Center.  There will be plenty of opportunities to attend educational classes, earn a variety of credits and time to network.  Check out the show website including the educational sessions, tradeshow schedule, and registration information.  Pre-registration deadline is Tuesday,...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

It's a Girl! (YUCK!)

This tree has been around a little while in the Snyder Park Gardens and Arboretum.  In fact, it's one of my favorite trees.  It's such a popular tree in this garden that we even decided to move the location of a sidewalk while developing our master landscape design in order to preserve this tree.  However, now that it has revealed its identity, I am not sure what we will do.

 

Yes, this particular tree is a ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba) and it's a girl.  We had no idea.  For at least the last three years while we have been hanging out at this site, creating a landscape...

Published on
Authors
Pam Bennett
It's Coming. Halloweeen Horrors chatfield.1 Mon, 10/30/2017 - 21:37

In a recent bygl-alert (https://bygl.osu.edu/node/944) I posed this challenge: More wicked (sometimes) plants this way shall come, culminating with Halloween, bygl alert-style. What are your candidates for the ultimate in plant wickedness? E-mail me at chatfield.1@osu.edu.

 

Or at least spookiness of some sort. Here are a few of your responses:

...
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Disease, Demystified chatfield.1 Sun, 10/29/2017 - 10:49

What are control strategies for managing oak wilt disease? What do we know about beech leaf disease? Does rose rosette virus affect ‘Knockout’ roses? Which crabapples have good genetic resistance to apple scab disease and how does this compare to 20 years ago? Does apple scab on the fruit matter (as seen on the lead slide for this bygl-alert)?

 

...
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Erik Draper
They're Baaack: Buckeyes! chatfield.1 Sat, 10/28/2017 - 14:20

While writing my bygl-alert on Aesculus parviflora yesterday afternoon, Joe Boggs was sending me photos: his latest bottlebrush buckeye beauties. I opened the message, and above and below are those images.

 

bottlebrush buckeye colony

Glorious fall! 

 

 

...

Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
The Beauty of Bottlebrush Buckeye chatfield.1 Fri, 10/27/2017 - 16:48

My, oh my, buckeyes, oh my, the weekend beckons, but for now, let us praise Aesculus parviflora. “No better plant could be recommended as a lawn shrub”, according to W.J. Bean, as quoted in Michael Dirr’s Manual of Woody Landscape Plants. Bottlebrush buckeye, is my favorite shrub” from an unnamed source in Holden Arboretum’s Plant Profiles, probably Brian Parsons.

 

 

  I concur. Palmately compound leaves with 5-7 leaflets, lovely in spring, summer and fall. Multi-stemmed...

Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Fall Leaf Drop Reveals Calico Scale boggs.47 Wed, 10/25/2017 - 15:38
Calico Scale spends the summer as crawlers attached to the main veins on the underside of leaves. Detection can be a challenge with crawlers distributed on foliage throughout the canopy. However, as fall approaches, the crawlers move onto stems where they spend the winter. Clusters of crawlers coupled with blackened stems are key diagnostic features for detecting a calico scale infestation.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Fabulous First Fall Foliage dehaas.2 Wed, 10/25/2017 - 07:54
Fall color is beginning in northeast Ohio. Although the Sugar Maples have not reached peak fall color, other plants including Sassafras, Sourwood, Black Tupelo, Staghorn Sumac, Burning Bush, and Dogwood have exploded in fall color.
Published on
Authors
Thomas deHaas
Horticultural Horrors II chatfield.1 Sun, 10/22/2017 - 20:13
“Roses have thorns, and silver fountains mud; Clouds and eclipses stain both moon and sun, And loathsome canker lives in sweetest bud, All plants make faults.”
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Terrapin Scale on Sycamore boggs.47 Sat, 10/21/2017 - 14:14
I posted a BYGL Alert last week extoling the virtues of one of my favorite native trees, American Sycamore [see, Ode to the Buttonwood Tree, October 18, 2017]. I came across a soft scale that I had never seen before on sycamore while taking pictures to illustrate the Alert. I would have included my find in the Alert, but it took me a while to settle on an identification.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
They're Heeeere! boggs.47 Fri, 10/20/2017 - 19:54
Boxelder Bugs were included along with several other notorious nuisance insects in my BYGL Alert titled, Fall Home Invaders are Poised to Enter (Sept. 30, 2017). They may have been poised then, but the bugs are now visiting homes en masse in southern Ohio. Indeed, I visited a home on Wednesday that was literally buggy with the bugs.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
ArborEATum: October 24 chatfield.1 Thu, 10/19/2017 - 16:09

  ArborEatum is just around the corner: next Tuesday, October 24. What fun it is: a friendly no-fee gathering of people who love to grow, culinaritize, eat, and drink various foods from landscapes and gardens. Come one come all to the Miller Pavilion at Ohio State University’s Secrest Arboretum, Tuesday, October 24, from 5:00 pm on. Eating and walking. Bring your offerings or just your appetites.

 

...
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield

Horticultural Horrors I

  Friday the 13th has just passed and in some sort of dyslexic dystopia, the 31st is just around the corner and Halloween will soon arrive. So it seems only right to write of that which is wrong - or shall we say – wicked, as in Wicked Plants. There is an excellent book by just that title, Wicked Plants: The Weed That Killed Lincoln’s Mother and Other Botanical Atrocitiesby Amy Stewart. I recommend it, but for now, let us take a little trip into the world of some plants wicked this way come, through the house of horticultural horrors, guided by myself...

Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield

Ode to the Buttonwood Tree

I often ask students in Master Gardener classes "what is a buttonwood tree?" to illustrate the challenge with common names of plants. Unlike scientific names, there is no recognized governing body that standardizes common names of plants. Consequently, plant names may vary widely (wildly?) owing to differences in the cultural backgrounds of people living in different geographical regions, among other things.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Delayed Woolly Bear Crawl-About?

Bristly "woolly bear" caterpillars commence their annual crawl-abouts in search of sheltered winter quarters in the fall; it's usually sometime in September in Ohio. They may be found on sidewalks, walking trails, roadways, or on the walls of homes and buildings. However, insects are sometimes made most noticeable by their absence.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Magnolia Scale Update

I first reported on Magnolia Scale (Neolecanium cornuparvum) this season in June when the maturing females were "puffing-up" and pumping out honeydew (see BYGL Alert, "Magnolia Scale is Pumping-Out Honeydew," June 16, 2017). My lengthy BYGL post included a description of the life-cycle for this "soft scale" as well as information on management options.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Don't Pick That Scab!

As a committed crabarian, I cringe along with everyone when driving into a town or walking along a street and seeing the barren, defoliated canopies of certain crabapples this summer and now into the fall. Out darn scab! (double apologies to W.S.).

 

Apple scabSymptoms of apple scab on...
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield

Osage Can You See

Osage-Orange has long been one of my favorite trees. What's not to like? Grows anywhere, has glossy, dark green foliage and deeply fissured orangish-tan bark with great winter interest. Just don’t stand or park your car under female trees at this time of the year.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
This is How You Do It! bennett.27 Wed, 10/04/2017 - 12:46

Need 100 one and a half gallon ornamental grasses planted?  Just put out an "all hands on deck" call to OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteers and they get the job done in  less than an hour!   This is exactly what we did in Clark County in order to complete our border planting in the Snyder Park Gardens and Arboretum (SPGA).  The border consists of more than 4000 daffodil bulbs, a river of daylillies and now Schizachyrium scoparium 'MinnblueA' or Blue Heaven little bluestem.  The idea is that after the spectacular daffodil bloom in the early spring, the bluestem will come up and help to...

Published on
Authors
Pam Bennett
European Hornets Cause Concern boggs.47 Wed, 10/04/2017 - 10:26
At some point each season, I have come to expect receiving at least one phone call or e-mail message from a concerned Ohioan reporting they’ve found Giant Asian Hornets in our state. Although there have been no confirmed sightings of these hornets in North America, I never reject such reports out-of-hand.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Aphid Outbreak boggs.47 Tue, 10/03/2017 - 19:17
I got a phone call from a homeowner in southwest Ohio who said they had an aphid problem on willows. They described the situation as huge numbers of aphids dropping from large willows onto their home, driveway, and barn; sticky "sap" raining down on everything; and all manner of things acquiring a blackened patina.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Fall Home Invaders are Poised to Enter boggs.47 Sat, 09/30/2017 - 15:47
Now that fall is officially in the air, a number of insects and spiders are poised to make their way into Ohio homes. Indeed, with the recent spate of cool temperatures, I've gotten a few reports of gnat-like Hackberry Psyllids (Pachypsylla spp.) buzzing around homes and various spiders marching across floors.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Seasonal Needle Drop in Full Swing boggs.47 Fri, 09/29/2017 - 13:12
I received a phone call yesterday from an Ohio landowner asking what was "killing" his Eastern white pine trees. Coincidentally, I was driving past a row of white pines with several trees looking pretty ragged owing to their normal shedding of inner needles at this time of the year. Although normal, it can sometimes be dramatically synchronous with all of the inner needles turning reddish-brown at once.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Angel Trumpets Sound kulhanek.5 Wed, 09/27/2017 - 10:53

During a recent visit to Kingwood Center Gardens in Mansfield, I was treated to Angel Trumpets in bloom. These summer-fall bloomers make for spectacular late season WOW! For Ohio growers, these are tropical and frost tender. They would need to be brought in each winter as Kingwood Center does, however a big pot and some TLC might be worth it for these show-stoppers.

 

Angel’s Trumpets, Brugmansia spp., are woody shrubs or small trees with large pendulous flowers. These huge trumpet-shaped flowers in total can be a foot long and come in white, yellow, orange, red or...

Published on
Authors
Ashley Kulhanek
An Introduction to the Pawpaw Experience boggs.47 Sat, 09/23/2017 - 12:58
My wife tasted her first pawpaw fruit yesterday which is hard to believe since she's been married to a native West Virginian for over 30 years. She loved it … the fruit; her West Virginian remains a day-to-day challenge.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Revisiting Some Scaly Old Friends boggs.47 Fri, 09/22/2017 - 12:33
I spotted some "old friends" yesterday scurrying over the rock walls, on the sidewalks, and in the landscaping at the Civic Garden Center of Greater Cincinnati. If you're a herpetologist, you would call my "friends" European wall lizards. However, if you're a native Cincinnatian, you would likely identify these non-native lizards as "Lazarus lizards."
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Rachised Over The Coals chatfield.1 Fri, 09/22/2017 - 09:11

  Yesterday, I did a profile (https://bygl.osu.edu/node/924) of the lovely shining or winged sumac (Rhus copallinum) that include the following statement: “The wings on the stems are cool. BYGL-alert readers were true to their calling. Alarum Alarum, Alert Alert. Within minutes, John Swintosky of Louisville and Fred Robinson of northeast Ohionproperly and politely responded with corrections.

 

  John Swintosky e-mailed: The "winged stem" noted is better called winged rachis,...

Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Shining Sumac: A Shrub For Any Week chatfield.1 Thu, 09/21/2017 - 07:00

  Earlier this week, I visited Charles Tubesing, Plant Collections Curator of Holden Arboretum along with Joe Cochran, Director of Secrest Arboretum. Much more on that later, but for now I simply must push out a Shrub of Any Week shout-out for a native sumac: shining or winged sumac, Rhus copallinum (this specific epithet, instead of copallina seems to be preferred).

 

...
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Perennial Plant of the Week - Leopard Plant stone.91 Tue, 09/19/2017 - 20:15

Do you have a shade garden? Are you looking for a fall blooming yellow flower with large leaves? Leopard plant (Ligularia dentata 'Othello') might be just the plant to consider. This herbaceous perennial is best grown in a humusy soil that is rich in organic matter. It preference is a medium to wet site that is in part shade to full shade. It is imperative that the site never fully dries out. Because of the need for moisture, this plant will benefit from a regular, deep watering during the summer, especially when temperature are high and Mother-Nature hasn't...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Along Came a Spider boggs.47 Tue, 09/19/2017 - 14:09
Ohioans may be surprised by the large number of spiders living near at hand when heavy morning dews accentuate their gossamer creations. Their conspicuous web-work can be striking when highlighted by early morning sunlight along roadways.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Woody Plant of the Week - Seven-Sons Flower

A recent walk through the Toledo Botanical Garden in Toledo, Ohio was simply enjoyable. Hints of fall colors and noticeable fruits were scattered throughout and were enjoyed by all. It was on the final leg of the walk, when the group turned the corner and white flowers immediately caught our attention. The blooms of the seven-sons flower (Heptacodium miconioides) were in their glory. It was the flowers that drew us in, but it was the pollinator activity that kept us watching. The insect activity was amazing.

...
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Emerald Ash Borer University - Fall 2017 stone.91 Tue, 09/19/2017 - 05:08

Interested in an emerald ash borer (EAB) update this fall? The fall-semester schedule of online EAB University classes have been scheduled. Classes can be viewed during an interactive live-session (see schedule times below), or viewed afterwards as a recorded session on the EABU YouTube Channel. In addition to EAB, there will be a session on Thousand Cankers Disease too! 

 

...
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Ohio Pollinator Habitat Initiative - Annual Milkweed Pod Collection stone.91 Tue, 09/19/2017 - 04:33

Due to the drastic decline in monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) populations, the Ohio Pollinator Habitat Initiative (OPHI) and local Soil & Water Conservation Districts are again seeking public involvement to collect common (Asclepias syriaca) and swamp (Asclepias incarnata) milkweed seed pods from established plants September 1 through October 30, 2017. This is the second year they will be collecting seed pods.

 

The seeds will be used to establish new plantings and additional habitat for the monarch butterfly throughout the buckeye state...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Hawk vs. Sparrows: Out My Front Door boggs.47 Mon, 09/18/2017 - 12:04
I'm not a "birder," but I like watching birds. These direct descendants of dinosaurs are fascinating creatures. They have raised my awareness on so many topics; who knew that the dinosaurs probably tasted like chicken?
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Pawpaws and Amphbians: Out My Back Door chatfield.1 Mon, 09/18/2017 - 07:19

  I stepped out my back door on a balmy late summer Sunday, my, oh, my, what oh what did I see? No “giant doing cartwheels”, no “statue wearin' high heels”, no “tambourines and elephants playin’ in the band”, but yes a few “happy creatures dancing on the lawn”. “Doo, doo, doo”, what to see, “lookin’ out my back door?”

 

  1). Pawpaw (Asimina triloba) – see above image. Only last week I purchased and planted a new pawpaw seedling from Secrest Arboretum. I needed to since, even though our pawpaw tree bloomed for the past several years, and especially well this year,...

Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield

White Masses on Stems of Wafer-Ash, Redbud, and Other Trees

Participants in the S.W. Ohio BYGLive! Diagnostic Walk-About held this past Monday in the Boone County Arboretum (Union, KY) observed wafer-ash stems festooned with small, sticky, snowy-white masses. The masses could easily be mistaken for a soft scale, mealybug, or perhaps an insect egg mass. In fact, they are the "egg plugs" of the Two-Marked Treehopper (order Hemiptera; family Membracidae).
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Bullet Galls and Bullet-Like Stingers

Participants in last Friday's 84th Ohio Plant Diagnostic Workshop held in the OSU OARDC Secrest Arboretum braved experiencing bullet-like stings to view numerous bald-faced hornets buzzing Oak Bullet Galls. The galls were also drawing the attention of a few yellowjackets and other stinging insects as well as some flies and ants. Of course, the question on everyone's mind was why were these insects being drawn to the galls?
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Chestnut Sawfly Found on Hickory

Participants at last week's First Annual Tree and Plant Diagnostic Walkabout Workshop held in Lake Hope State Park in Vinton County, OH, came across a group of striking black-and-yellow striped sawfly larvae feeding on hickory. I had never see this sawfly before and after exhausting all of my usual routes for identifying tree pests, I followed the advice commonly given to me by seeking professional help.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Bent Science Salon: Weird Things in the Woods

  Come one, come all. The Bent Science Salon officially opens in two weeks, on Thursday, September 21 at 7:00pm. First up: Weird Things in the Woods, channeled through a Weird Thing himself, yours truly, Jim Chatfield. This is only the first of these salons, continuing on the third Thursday of every month: next will be Dan Herms on Plant Phenology (Not Phrenology) and Climate Change, on October 19.

 

...
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield

Stinging Caterpillar Commentary

I learned a valuable lesson during last week's First Annual Tree and Plant Diagnostic Walkabout Workshop held in the beautiful Lake Hope State Park in Vinton County, OH. If you want to find caterpillars, you should hike with Tom Macy, Forest Health Program Administer, with the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Forestry. Tom's cater-optic prowess is truly remarkable.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Gomphocarpus; The Balloon Plant chatfield.1 Thu, 09/07/2017 - 13:53
he late-season handiwork of the Basswood Leafroller (Pantographa limata, family Crambidae (Crambid Snout Moths)) clearly describes the unusual leaf-abodes created by this moth caterpillar. Individual translucent green caterpillars reside inside cigar-like nests created in a repeating three step process.
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield

More Beech Diagnostics

American beech (Fagus grandifolia) is one of our most elegant woodland and parkland trees; it puts the sylvan in silviculture. There are many problems afoot, however, both large and small.

 

  For this alert, though, let us set aside the death and life realities of killer beech bark disease and the Boggsian itty-bitty bite/peench story of the beech blight (boogie-woogie) aphids (http://bygl.osu.edu/node/883). Let us look at...

Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield

Redbud Leaffolder Trekking Through Generations

Last season, the unusual leaf symptoms caused by the Redbud Leaffolder on its namesake host were observed throughout Ohio. Questions regarding leaves turning brown after being folded over or "glued" together continued to come into Extension offices throughout September. This could be a repeat season based on what I've seen so far.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

O Dodder, Where Art Thou?

  Well, on a recent odyssey to Pennsylvania, dodder was along a streamside bank, in small amounts amongst a lot of knot. Dodder as in Cuscata, a parasitic plant in the Convolvulaceae (morning glory family). Knot as in Japanese knotweed, or Fallopia japonica, touted as one of the most pervasive invasive weeds in the eastern United States.

 

...

Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield

Coneflower Cleanup

Coneflowers have long been one my favorites in landscapes and naturalized areas because of their attractiveness to pollinators of all sorts. Of course, this is the time of the season when we may walk away from them as they start looking pretty rough. However, we should continue to focus our attention on detecting and managing two serious problems that will only get worse next season
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Unusual Plant-Eating Cockroach

I came across an unusual cockroach while visiting a greenhouse last week in southwest Ohio. The Australian Cockroach is a tropical species that will feed on and damage plants; they do not confine their appetites to the "normal" table fare associated with cockroaches found in Ohio. Indeed, I spoke to a former IPM specialist for an eastern conservatory who told me they suffered significant losses of seedlings and rooted cuttings from these cockroaches.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Bagworms in the Bag boggs.47 Thu, 08/24/2017 - 12:12
This has been an active season for Common Bagworms in Ohio with heavy localized populations observed in many areas of the state. Thankfully, the damage caused by these caterpillars wrapped in silk bags festooned with host plant debris is drawing to a close. A high percentage of bagworms in Ohio have now tied their bags to anchorage points and closed their bags' openings in preparation for pupation.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Curtis E. Young
Anltions are the Pits boggs.47 Thu, 08/24/2017 - 11:02
I was thrilled to come across the conical pits of Antlions yesterday; the handiwork of one of my favorite insects. I had become concerned that above average rainfall this season had drowned-out a robust year for these fascinating predators. However, the localized population in the home landscaping I visited appeared to be very healthy with pits in several locations.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Wheel Bugs are Rolling Along boggs.47 Tue, 08/22/2017 - 14:57
Wheel bug nymphs are completing their development and the adults of these large, unusual looking bugs are beginning to lurk among the leaves of trees and shrubs in Ohio in search of prey. Although caterpillars and sawfly larvae are favored table fare of this impressively large predator, they will not turn their beaks up at other arthropod meat morsels.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Botany in a Box chatfield.1 Tue, 08/22/2017 - 00:59

This past weekend my wife Laura came inside with a Botany in a Box she had collected and arranged from our backyard, a delightful mixture of flowers and miniature eggplants and melons, kousa dogwood fruits, crabapples, Korean maple fruits and more treasures. It is for her new 2nd grade class that started Monday.

 

  It reminded me of the simple joys of collecting and sharing these miniaturizations of horticultural and woodland nature. So, along with her welcome for her students, here are a few thoughts from an Akron Beacon Journal article I wrote eight years ago, with a box...

Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Garden Spider Orb Weavers boggs.47 Mon, 08/21/2017 - 13:26
This is the time of the year when many species of spiders in Ohio begin to reach their maximum size as they fully mature. Two of our larger native spiders are the Black and Yellow Garden Spider and its similarly showy cousin, the Banded Garden Spider. Both belong to the orb weaver family (Araneidae), so named because of their flat, circular webs
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Leaf-Footed Bugs boggs.47 Sat, 08/19/2017 - 08:49
Leaf-footed bugs (family Coreidae) are rife with discrepancies. Their name is based on leaf-like expansions of their hind tibia, not their "feet;" however, many species lack the leaf-like feature. The family name Coreidae is derived from the Ancient Greek word for bedbug; however, bedbugs belong to a different family, Cimicidae. They are not called stink bugs (Family Pentatomidae), but some do stink.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Diagnostics: Now and in September chatfield.1 Sat, 08/19/2017 - 08:26
Diagnostics – why good plants go bad – is a big part of what we do at OSU Extension and a key skill for all horticulturists. I was doing a walkabout yesterday at the Secrest Arboretum just outside my office in Wooster, OH and took a few pictures.
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Joe Boggs
Lake County Field Day chatfield.1 Thu, 08/17/2017 - 18:25

Last week the Nursery Growers of Lake County Ohio (NGLCO) put on their 50th Summer Field Day at the lovely Chalet Debonne Winery. This event is always a great time to network, rediscover old friends and make new friends. And to see plants – and even owls.  Here are a few visual highlights.

 

  In addition to the hibiscus above there is the always colorful Garden Guru Charles Behnke, former and ever OSU Extension Agent.  Charles was chatting with Bob Froelich, Ornamental Specialist, newly with BayerCrop Science. Bob noted that Bayer and the aspirin-ish logo is the second...

Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Fall Webworm Update and More Red-Heads Found boggs.47 Thu, 08/17/2017 - 12:36
Fall Webworm has two generations per season in Ohio. The "fall" in the webworm's common name is based on the appearance of second generation nests late in the season. First generation nests began to appear in southern Ohio in late May and second generation caterpillars are now on the scene. Localized fall webworm populations are high throughout the state with nests becoming more evident as they undergo late-season expansion.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Must See - Pollinator Quick Guides stone.91 Thu, 08/17/2017 - 09:48
There is a lot of "buzz" on bees and other pollinators in the news. People are interested and want to know what they can do to help the cause. 
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Trumbull Trail Test For You chatfield.1 Wed, 08/16/2017 - 17:04

  Yesterday, I visited Lee Beers, the OSU Extension Agriculture and Natural Resource educator in Trumbull County, and as plant lovers (Lee is finishing his PhD on lowbush blueberry physiology and genetics), we had to take a walk. Adjacent to the OSU, Trumbull County office is county land and the Mosquito Lake State Park. So, in this 48-hour flash quiz, a prize awaits for the person with the most correct answers in that time to the plant and pest photo questions from our walk. If ties; the very first top score shall prevail.  

 

  Let us begin with pictures of fruits,...

Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
WIldflower of the Week chatfield.1 Tue, 08/15/2017 - 17:51

Last weekend, at a lovely wedding weekend for my wife’s cousin’s daughter and beau in the Leelanau peninsula area of west-central Michigan, some of us took a pre-wedding walk to Pyramid Point near Lake Michigan. The views up the short trail to the summit were spectacular. Descending to the trailhead, off to the side of the trail in a meadow area was a – very cool herbaceous flower.

 

...
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
2018 Gypsy Moth Suppression Applications Due September 1, 2017 stone.91 Tue, 08/15/2017 - 16:15

If you are seeing gypsy moth egg masses and are interested in learning if the area could qualify to be part of the ODA Gypsy Moth Suppression Program, here are some details.

Treatment criteria:

  • Proposed block must be located in a county that has been designated quarantine for gypsy moth by ODA. See map below.  Counties in red are in the quarantine.

...
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Peony Measles chatfield.1 Mon, 08/14/2017 - 13:55

Cultivate your own garden, said Voltaire at the end of Candide.  Looking homeward, I note that peony measles, first seen in mid-July has continued to develop.  Measles, or red spot or leaf blotch or Cladosporium leaf blotch disease are alternative names for this fungal disease. It is caused by, you guessed it, Cladosporium paeoniae or, who knew, with its new moniker, Dicholocladosporium chlorocephalum. 

 

  On the upper leaf surface, reddish and brownish “measles”-like spots develop earlier in summer, now coalescing into purple blotches...

Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Tree of The Week: Hackberries Excel in Amherst chatfield.1 Sun, 08/13/2017 - 13:41

I admit that in the old days I thought of hackberry (Celtis) mostly as a common mid-sized native woodland tree, adaptable to variable soil types, but not so much as a landscape plant. Counter to this, Davis Sydnor always extolled hackberries, especially Celtis laevigata (sugarberry), but also common hackberry (Celtis occidentalis). I am now becoming educated, Davis.  

 

...

Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Mosquito Alert boggs.47 Sat, 08/12/2017 - 11:21
I was amazed last week at the cloud of mosquitoes buzzing in my wake as I hiked in a wooded park in southwest Ohio. Studies have shown that the relative attractiveness of individuals to mosquitoes varies and I've never been very attractive to mosquitoes. However, the enormous swarm following me through the woods could have been organizing an airlift operation!
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Weed of the Week: Dayflowers Not So Common chatfield.1 Sat, 08/12/2017 - 08:19

In the ChatScape there is a lovely little flower, the Asiatic dayflower, Commelina communis, which has taken advantage of our travels this summer, invading any number of garden sites. It is well-known to move into “disturbed” sites, which may say something of this laissez-faire gardener, if not my wife. This herbaceous wanderer has quite a storied profile, from its two sky-blue petals subtended by one small white petal to the use of its blue pigments in Japanese dyes for woodcuts.

 

  Dayflower is studied for possible bioremediation for removing toxic levels of...

Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Going on an Egg Hunt - Gypsy Moth Style! stone.91 Sat, 08/12/2017 - 07:07

The gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) is a non-native invasive species. This insect is currently in the egg mass stage, and will be in this stage until next spring when the caterpillars will hatch and begin feeding. Egg masses can help predict what population levels could be for the upcoming season. Now is the time to look for egg masses. Egg masses can be found almost anywhere. While we tend to look on trees, they can be found on homes, sheds, trailers, dog houses, bird houses, on firewood, on fences, yard art and signs. Egg masses can also be hidden under loose bark or in tree...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Robber Flies: Insect Fighter Jets! boggs.47 Fri, 08/11/2017 - 17:17
One of my favorite insects is the Red-Footed Cannibalfly which is a type of robber fly (family Asilidae). Few carnivorous insects can match the amazing acrobatics and predatory proficiency of robber flies in their pursuit of prey. Adults of all species are predators and they will attack a variety of insects; even "armed" prey and insects much larger than their own body size.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Monarchs vs. Tussocks boggs.47 Fri, 08/11/2017 - 14:37
I've received two e-mail message this week asking for a recommendation to control native Milkweed Tussock Moth caterpillars feeding on their namesake host. The senders were well-meaning Monarch Butterfly enthusiasts who were concerned the tussocks were eating the monarchs out of house and home.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Did You Give or Receive on Tuesday? stone.91 Thu, 08/10/2017 - 13:22

Did you know that Tuesday, August 8th was "Sneak A Zucchini on Your Neighbor's Front Porch Day"? Did you sneak, or did you get snuck upon? Didn't participate this year?  Be sure it is on the calendar for 2018! 

 

While this is a fun thing to do, it is important to remember if you have excess fruits and vegetables this time of the year, it is a great opportunity to share your bountiful harvest with others.  A simple sharing can occur neighbor-to-neighbor, among friends and family members, or excess produce can be donated food banks, kitchens or pantries.  Different...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

White Grub Management

This has been one of the most prolific seasons for Japanese beetles in Ohio for many years. High localized populations were observed throughout the state. Adult populations of both Northern and Southern Masked Chafers, two of our other common "white grub producing" beetles, were also very high this season, particularly in the central and southern parts of Ohio.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Dave Shetlar

Time to Tidy Up the Perennial Garden

Most of the perennials in my garden have bloomed a little earlier than normal.  Here it is almost the second week in August and I am seeing the late August perennials such as Sedum and goldenrod start to bloom.  It's also time for me to do a little cleaning up in the gardens, especially with those plants that have finished blooming such as Echinacea (coneflowers), Nepeta (catmint) and others.
Published on
Authors
Pam Bennett

Linden ID

It’s Sunday night, I check my e-mail, and Frank Sinibaldi asks: “Mr. Chatfield, can you tell me what tree this comes from?”  I check out the attached image, and there it is: a linden bract with attached peduncle, pedicels and fruits.

 

  So, linden (Tilia spp.) is the tree. Common lindens are the American linden or basswood (Tilia americana), littleleaf linden (Tilia cordata) native to Europe and into Asia, and the hybrid Crimean linden Tilia x euchlora).  Lindens are much bee-beloved.

 

...
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield

A Plant Walk in Wooster

The great thing for all of us as plant lovers is the simplicity of enjoyment of a walk in the woods or through city streets, checking out the plants we know. Here are some snapshots of just a few plant sightings on an afternoon walk in Wooster, Ohio a few days ago.

 

  First, as our lead photo, at the edge of a parking lot was Calycanthus, which a Clemson fact sheet notes has common names of Carolina allspice, strawberry-bush, sweet bubby {my favorite}, sweet Betsy, and spicebush {my least favorite since we think of Lindera benzoin as spicebush up North...

Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield

Crepe Myrtles For Ohio

While in Maryland and Virginia recently our Extension Nursery Landscape and Turf Team of diagnosticians admired crepe myrtles (Lagerstroemia indica) in whites, reds, and lavenders.  Absolutely gorgeous trees for their flower displays and their attractive bark.
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield

Quiz Results: Name That Pine

What a great response to our Name That Pine query posed last Friday. There were dozens of responses, some on Friday and Saturday, and then again a number today, Monday July 31. At first, this bimodal response rate puzzled me until I realized that some of you do not get bygl-alerts, our just-in-time alerts to your phone via e-mails, vs. the Monday summary of the previous weeks alerts. 

 

 How can you possibly not want to be alerted by phone the very moment that we ask for your pine ID skills and other matters!!! Well, it is imaginable, but if you do want to get those alerts...

Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield

Ohio Local Foods Week

What does local foods mean to you? While there is not one definition for “local” food - it is very personal and can vary from person to person. Some people are able to grow their own food. Others grow some food, and also support local producers by purchasing food from them.  And still others only purchase local foods from local producers. 
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

Name That Pine

True pines, as opposed to say, Norfolk Island-pine (Araucaria heterophylla) or Japanese umbrella-pine (Sciadopitys verticillata) are in the genus Pinus, which differs from other genera in the Pinaceae family. Other genera in the family include, for example, spruces (Picea), firs (Abies), and hemlocks (Tsuga).
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield

Step Away From the Mimosa!

As we continue traveling south to Washington DC, we were moseying along some backroads in Virginia and suddenly the camera crew began yelling “stop the van… pull over”.  We piled out to run over trying to position ourselves to take photos of a HUGE Albizia julibrissin, commonly known as Mimosa or Persian Silk tree.

 

...
Published on
Authors
Erik Draper
Jim Chatfield

Another Leafminer of Black Locust

On July 22, 2017, Joe Boggs wrote a BYGL Alert on the "flaming" of black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) by the locust leafminer beetle (Odontota dorsalis) in certain areas of Ohio.  These "flamed" trees are easily observed along highways from southeast to northeast Ohio. Interestingly, Curtis Young and Amy Stone in Northwest Ohio seldom see any evidence of locust leafminer beetle.  They have to travel east to at least Mansfield, Ohio before seeing the activities of this leafminer and it isn't because of a lack of black locust trees. 

...
Published on
Authors
Curtis E. Young
Sassafras: Simply Fruitful chatfield.1 Thu, 07/27/2017 - 11:28

In a previous Tree of the Week, I featured sassafras, but noted that I did not have an image of their very cool-looking fruits, though I once did have said image. I figured that I had electronically misplaced or that it was from all the way back in the Kodachrome Slide Era (somewhere between the Dirt Age and the Middle-Age Anthropocene).  So…

 

Voila. I have seen bright carmine red fruits, and here you can see both the early speckled green phase and cool grape-Kool Aid purple. Sassafras, a lovely native tree.

 

...

Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield

NW Ohio Green Industry Summer Session

It is not too late to attend the 2017 Green Industry Summer Session at Owens Community College in NW Ohio.  The annual event is held the first Wednesday of August.  This year the event is held August 2nd.  Registration begins at 11:00 am with a boxed lunch, with the first session starting at 11:45 am.  The event concludes at 4:15 pm with opportunities to earn ISA, ODA and OCVN credits. 
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

The Other Guignardia...

Joe Boggs wrote a great article “Guignardia Leaf Blotch Running Rampant” the other day, which caused me to reflect on another Guignardia fungus often ignored, but very important.  The other Guignardia, Guignardia bidwellii, is one responsible for causing the disease Black Rot of Grape.
Published on
Authors
Erik Draper
Curtis E. Young

Upcoming Programs, Oh My

Here are a few upcoming programs to get on your calendars. Registration information to come on websites soon.  All are at Secrest Arboretum at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster, except for the Bent Science salons at the Bent Ladder Cider and Winery outside Doylestown, Ohio, and the Why Trees Matter program, at the College of Wooster.  
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield

Harlequin Bug on Cleome

The harlequin bug (Murgantia histrionica) (a.k.a. calico bug, fire bug or harlequin cabbage bug) is a black stink bug with either yellow-orange or red markings on both its back and stomach. Additionally, there are some white markings around the edge of its abdomen.  As with all true stink bugs, it belongs to the family Pentatomidae.

 

...
Published on
Authors
Curtis E. Young

Annual of the Week - Sunflower 'Birds & Bees'

 

 

Sunflower Helianthus annuus ‘Birds & Bees’

 

While at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Garden in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, there was a sunflower in their vegetable garden that caught my attention. ‘Birds & Bees’ is a 6 – 8’ tall sunflower that has golden-yellow petals and chocolate discs.

 

While flowering, sunflowers offer a pollen and nectar source for foraging honey bees, native bees and many other garden pollinators. At maturity, these black seeded sunflowers of ‘Birds & Bees’ provide oil-rich kernels. The shells...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

Perennial of the Week: There is More to a Plant Than Just the Name - Joe Pye Weed

When a plant has “weed” as part of its name, it could cause a little bit of confusion. As a gardener, would you feel as you could really brag and be proud of a plant in the landscape that is called a weed? Well of course the answer is yes, especially if it is Joe pye weed (Eutrochium purpureum).  Brag away!  

 

While Joe pye weed (Eutrochium purpureum) can be observed growing along roadsides, some have never taken in to consideration its outstanding ornamental characteristics. It is a large plant which needs space, but when planted in mass it can provide...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

Guignardia Leaf Blotch Running Rampant

Our continual wet weather over much of Ohio this season has been a two-edged sword. On one hand, we haven't had to drag hoses to water our landscapes. On the other hand, a number of fungal plant pathogens that require wet conditions to infect and produce their associated diseases are running rampant. Such is obviously the case for Guignardia aesculi; the fungus responsible for Guignardia Leaf Blotch of Aesculus.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Plants of the Beehive State

This past week I was in the Beehive State, Utah, first speaking at a conference and then for a bit of vacation. My wife and I visited both the red rock and desert areas in southern Utah and then in the north, the more verdant areas of the Uinta and Wasatch mountain ranges. Utah, which became the 45th state in 1896, was named the Beehive State for the hard-working, industrious inhabitants.
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Annual Flaming of Black Locust Trees boggs.47 Fri, 07/21/2017 - 20:10
Jim Chatfield called me from the road this morning to report seeing "flamed" black locusts along a highway in northeast Ohio. The captivating reddish-brown leaf coloration caused by the native Locust Leafminer Beetle is often a familiar sight to travelers motoring on Ohio's interstate highways. Indeed, when beetle populations are high during "outbreak years," black locust trees are able to be identified at highway speeds because of their blow-torched appearance.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Jim Chatfield
Monarchs vs. Aphids boggs.47 Fri, 07/21/2017 - 15:42
What are those hordes of yellow aphids sucking juices from common milkweed "reserved" for monarch butterfly caterpillars? They are Oleander Aphids and their appearance on milkweeds reminds us that nature makes no food reservations. This non-native aphid may be found sucking juices from over 50 hosts belonging to 16 plant families.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Return Engagement of Boogie-Woogie Aphids boggs.47 Thu, 07/20/2017 - 16:10
David Gressley (Director of Horticulture, Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum) sent me a video yesterday morning of a chorus line of Beech Blight Aphids (Grylloprociphilus imbricator) shaking their woolly derrieres in a synchronous samba. Frankly, I believe no other insect upstages this aphid in entertainment value.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Pine Cones on Willow? boggs.47 Wed, 07/19/2017 - 15:20
The improbable looking but appropriately named Willow Pinecone Galls are now large enough to be very noticeable on their namesake host. As the common name suggests, the galls closely resemble pine cones with closed seed scales. They are produced on willow by a gall-midge but cause little damage to the overall health of their namesake host.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Two Cats on the Prowl boggs.47 Tue, 07/18/2017 - 18:01
Two general defoliators are producing damage in southwest Ohio: yellownecked caterpillars and walnut caterpillars. Both of these caterpillars feed in groups, or "colonies," of 10-30 individuals throughout their development which is why their defoliation is often focused on a single branch or a group of adjoining branches. However, it's also why multiple colonies can quickly defoliate small trees.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Dogbane Discoveries boggs.47 Tue, 07/18/2017 - 16:02
Dogbane is the representative species for the dogbane family, Apocynaceae, which includes milkweeds and other plants that ooze milky sap ladened with poisonous alkaloids. Indeed, Apocynum translates to "poisonous to dogs," or "dog killer." Sap from the plant is reported to have been used against ravenous feral dogs.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Check out The OSU Cultivar Trials in VR Mode rhodus.1 Mon, 07/17/2017 - 13:14
For 2017, a new program is available at the Ohio State University Cultivar Trial garden that offers a 360˙ panorama tour for anyone who uses a computer, cell phone, tablet or  a VR headset.
Published on
Authors
Tim Rhodus
Act Now to Control White Pine Weevil boggs.47 Mon, 07/17/2017 - 12:58
White pine weevil larval feeding damage is now evident throughout Ohio. Look for brown, wilted main shoots (terminal leaders) with the tips sometimes curved into a "shepherd’s crook." There is one generation per year and localized populations may be reduced by removing and destroying the infested terminals before new adult weevils emerge.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Gallignostics

  Let us call this A Case of Gallignostics. Plant galls are defined as abnormal plant growths caused by a gall-maker; the gall-maker being certain insects, mites, fungi, and bacteria. From horned oak gall to bacterial crown gall, from maple bladder galls to cedar-apple rust galls, there are many galls of interest to horticulturists. Relative to all this, Joe Boggs recently got an e-mail from Michael Goldman of the Grange Insurance Audubon Center:

 

  I'm a big fan of the BYGL, and found something here that might be interesting for it.  The pictures I took look like some...

Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Joe Boggs

A Stinging Commentary on Wasps, Yellowjackets, and Baldfaced Hornets.

Paper Wasps, Yellowjackets, and Baldfaced Hornets are beneficial insects. Just keep repeating that to yourself when you're being chased or stung by these hymenopteran marauders! They’ve been with us since the beginning of the season. However, this is the time of the year when their ever-expanding nests become large enough and contain enough individuals to make their presence sometimes painfully known.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Chainsaw Safety - Level One stone.91 Fri, 07/14/2017 - 19:38
Aug 3, 2017, 8:00am CSAW Level 1 - A full 8 hour class with a lecture portion in the morning and a hands-on portion in the afternoon.
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Kathy Smith
Diagnostic Workshop: What's Wrong With My Tree? stone.91 Fri, 07/14/2017 - 19:30

Workshop Name:  Tree Diagnostic Workshop - What’s Wrong With My Tree?

 

Workshop Date:  Friday, August 4, 2017

 

Event Location:  Ohio State University Mansfield, 100 Ovalwood Hall, 1760 University Drive, Mansfield, Ohio

 

This Ohio Woodland Stewards Program spends the day with Extension specialists to diagnose some common and not so common tree problems. Learn what trees need immediate attention from what is just cosmetic and won’t compromise the health of the tree. 

 

Ask questions and get answers and find...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Kathy Smith
Creeping Flecks of Gold and Animated Piles of Frass boggs.47 Fri, 07/14/2017 - 14:21
Look closely at the leaves of ornamental sweet potatoes, morning glories, or bindweed for flecks of gold creeping across the lower leaf surfaces; those would be Golden Tortoise Beetles (Charidotella sexpunctata). They are also called “sweet potato beetles” because of their common occurrence on both cultivated and ornamental sweet potatoes and “goldbugs” because of their appearance.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Trefoil Foiling Lawns, Landscapes, and Naturalized Areas boggs.47 Fri, 07/14/2017 - 11:20
The bright yellow floral display currently blanketing some lawns and roadway right-of-ways is being produced by Birdsfoot Trefoil. The yellow flowers are smaller than dandelion flowers, bigger than those of black medic, and resemble buttercups from a distance. This non-native plant was imported with good intentions, but is now gaining weed status in lawns, landscapes, and naturalized areas in Ohio. Yet another example of unintended consequences with introducing non-natives.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Killers Welcome Cicada Emergence boggs.47 Thu, 07/13/2017 - 15:29
Annual Dog-Day Cicadas emerging in southwest Ohio are being “welcomed” by their nemesis, Cicada Killer Wasps. This is the largest wasp found in Ohio and the annual cicadas are their select prey. An abrupt halt in the buzzing of a cicada, often punctuated by a high-pitched screech, usually means a wasp has committed an insecticidal act
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
A Tale of Two Bagworms chatfield.1 Wed, 07/12/2017 - 08:05

Tale of Two Bagworms

  As the BoggMan writeth, early bagworm damage is oft overlooked, with skeletonization injury passed off as Japanese beetle injury or other chewing insect damage. This was driven home to me last week as I checked out some elm street trees in Orrville.

 

...
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Coneflower Calamities boggs.47 Tue, 07/11/2017 - 18:15
Participants at yesterday’s S.W. Ohio Diagnostic Walk-About viewed two problems on purple coneflowers; one potentially more calamitous than the other. The first was the handiwork of the Sunflower Head-Clipping Weevil (Haplorhynchites aeneus) which included dangling seed heads and stems that looked like soda straws. The second were stunted plants and deformed plant parts caused by the phytoplasma disease known as Aster Yellows.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) Quarantine Expansion boggs.47 Tue, 07/11/2017 - 14:24
Quarantines are a primary tool in preventing the spread of Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) (Anoplophora glabripennis) in Ohio and elsewhere in North America. They stop the beetle from hitchhiking to new locations in infested materials such as logs, firewood, pruned branches, etc. Yesterday, the ODA, ODNR, and USDA APHIS announced an expansion of the ALB quarantine in Clermont County, OH.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Weed of the Week - Oriental Bittersweet stone.91 Thu, 07/06/2017 - 10:59
There is nothing "sweet" about Oriental bittersweet. This non-native species appears to be popping up, and then growing up, in NW Ohio. While it was an occasional invader in natural areas, forests and fence lines, more and more people are having to manage this invasive species.
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
More Japanese Beetle Abounding stone.91 Thu, 07/06/2017 - 10:22
Earlier this week, Joe Boggs reported localized high populations of Japanese beetles via a BYGL Alert, Japanese Beetles Abound - http://bygl.osu.edu/node/811  The report included excellent photos and on the ground reports from BYGL readers. 
Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Bountiful Bagworm Blunder boggs.47 Wed, 07/05/2017 - 21:18
I drove past four upright European hornbeams (Carpinus betulus ‘Fastigiata’) today that were riddled with Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica) damage; or so I thought. However, bagworms are sneaky feeders; their damage may be blamed on other pests.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Japanese Beetles Abound boggs.47 Wed, 07/05/2017 - 18:45
I probably don’t need to post a BYGL Alert! to make you aware that we are seeing large numbers of Japanese Beetles (Popillia japonica) in Ohio this season; you have no doubt seen them for yourselves. In fact, some of you have literally run into the beetles.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) Workshop boggs.47 Wed, 07/05/2017 - 17:07
The Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) is potentially the most devastating non-native pest to have ever arrived in North America. The beetle kills trees belonging to 12 genera and, if it escapes eradication, ALB would cause a catastrophic loss of trees. Early detection is essential to eradication success. Learn how you can help stop ALB!
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Perennial of the Week - Liatris stone.91 Tue, 07/04/2017 - 08:55

 

Commonly called blazing star or gayfeather, this perennial produces tall spikes of bright purple flowers that resemble bottlebrushes above the green strap-like foliage. This perennial is in the Asteraceae family and there are 32 species that occur throughout much of North America from southern Canada to northern Mexico.

 

The individual flowers open from the top to the bottom, unlike most plants that open from the bottom upward as the spike develops.  Flowers of this perennial act like insect magnets - attracting both bees and butterflies.  Flower spikes can also...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone

Summertime...And Flowers Are Boooming

Emerson says: The Earth laughs in flowers.  Springtime, though, is when we tend to think of such mirth.   Summer is now our season, yet floral beauty continues to reign. Following are five of the boys and girls of summer.

 

 

  Above is the spectacular and aromatic flower of Stewartia, a member of the camellia family (Theaceae), photographed at Secrest Arboretum where Joe Cochran, Paul Snyder, Matt Shultzman, and the legacy of Kenny Cochran, hanuve resulted in numerous stewartias planted in recent years.

 

 

  Next, is...

Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Squirrels Debarking Trees: Part 2 boggs.47 Mon, 07/03/2017 - 17:24
Thanks to Tim Turner who is truly an alert BYGL Alert! reader, I can provide some new information on the “Calcium Hypothesis.” In my BYGL Alert! posted this morning, I cited a scientific paper published in 2016 that proposed squirrels are stripping bark to acquire calcium from the phloem tissue. The authors of the paper tagged this explanation for bark-stripping as the “Calcium Hypothesis.”
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Oak Leaf Blister Disease

  Oak leaf blister, a fungal disease caused by Taphrina caerulescens, is widespread this year on a range of oak species, both in the white oak and red oak groups. Symptoms include raised, blistered, greenish-yellow spots on upper leaf surfaces and darker, corresponding sunken spots on lower leaf surfaces, though sometimes the raised and sunken aspects may be obscured. Fungal growth can sometimes be seen on undersurfaces of leaves.

 

...
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
Squirrels Debarking Trees boggs.47 Sun, 07/02/2017 - 13:50