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Spotted Lanternfly Found in Virginia

The spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) was recently detected in Frederick County, Virginia on January 10, 2018. It has been reported that egg masses and a dead adult were found.

 

The spotted lanternfly, an invasive planthopper, was first discovered in the United States in Pennsylvania in the fall of 2014. It is native to China, India, Vietnam, and introduced to Korea where it has become a major pest. This insect has the potential to greatly impact the grape, hops and logging industries. In November of 2017 a single female was found in New Castle County...

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Amy Stone

ODA Announces 2018 Gypsy Moth Treatment Project Open Houses

While all is quite in the gypsy moth's world, much preparation is occurring in Ohio to manage future gypsy moth populations this year as part of the two programs ODA administers:  Slow-The-Spread and Suppression.  Recently ODA released the schedule for their 2018 Gypsy Moth Treatment Open Houses and the 2018 Treatment Maps. Treatment blocks have been identified and are planned in19 Ohio Counties. Treatments will occur after caterpillars hatch this spring and when weather conditions are favorable.  Treatments are made to protect trees from damage from the leaf feeding caterpillars like seen...

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Amy Stone

USDA Updates Emerald Ash Borer Map, January 2018

While emerald ash borer (EAB) may be considered "old-news" in the buckeye state, many may want to keep a watchful eye on its progression beyond Ohio. Each month, USDA APHIS produces an updated EAB Detection Map. Occasionally, we like to post these updated maps on BYGL for those that are interested in monitoring the spread of the pest in North America. 

 

The most recent additions to the map include:

  • initial county detections in: St. Clair and Talladega Counties, Alabama; Queens County, New York; and Eau...
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Amy Stone

ODA Announces New Finds of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid in Ohio in Athens, Geauga and Lake Counties

Earlier today, the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) the Ohio Department of Natural Resources(ODNR) announced the discovery of a hemlock-killing pest in Lake, Geauga and Athens counties. The hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) is a small, aphid-like insect native to Asia, which threatens the health and sustainability of two hemlock tree species native to the eastern United States.

 

HWA was first reported in the eastern United States in 1951 near Richmond, Virginia. Today, it is established in portions of 20 states from...

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Amy Stone

Emerald Ash Borer University - 2018

Emerald Ash Borer University (EABU) recently released the dates and topics of its upcoming "virtual semester." Five FREE webinars are scheduled in February and March. Each session will last approximately one hour. A certificate of participation can be emailed to those participating on the live webinars. All sessions will be recorded and linked to the National EAB Website at www.emeraldashborer.info following the session using YouTube.

 

EABU is a free webinar series supported through the US Forest Service and coordinated by...

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Amy Stone

Honeylocusts and Mastodons

This is a great time of the year to slow down, sit down, and contemplate answers to big questions. Like, what do honeylocusts and pronghorns have in common? Why do Osage orange trees, Kentucky coffeetrees, and avocado trees have such large seed packages? In all cases, what we see now was shaped by animals that no longer exist; they are extinct.
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Joe Boggs

USDA Posts New Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) Newsletter

Earlier today (12/29/2017), the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) posted an eNewsletter designed to keep everyone up-to-date with Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) eradication efforts in the US. While some BYGL readers might receive the eNewsletter directly from USDA, we wanted to make sure as many people are in the "ALB-know" as possible. 

 

Presently, there are active eradication programs operating in three states including New York, Massachusetts and Ohio.

 

While information on eradication efforts in each state is valuable to follow and stay up-...

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Amy Stone

That May Not Be Snow on Those Alders!

BYGL reports become sparse at this time of the year with cold temperatures suppressing our subject matter. So, I was surprised last Thursday when I got an e-mail from John Martini, University of Cincinnati's Landscape Architect, with an image taken by UC Planner Joe Willging showing collections of white fluffy material on the branches of an alder (Alnus sp.).
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Joe Boggs
Scouting for Scale at Snowy Solstice dehaas.2 Wed, 12/20/2017 - 09:06

Scouting for scale in the Winter is great use of your time. 

Scale comes in many shapes, sizes and varieties. Last year we saw Oyster Shell, Calico, Juniper, Greevy, Bamboo, Fletcher, Japanese maple, Pine Needle, Brown, Putnam, Euonymus and Magnolia Scale.

Scale is sometimes hard to see when a plant is in full foliage. But in the winter with no leaves on trees and shrubs, except evergreen, scale are easier to see.

Scouting scale in the winter makes sense because there is less to care for outside in the landscape. The following pictures are Scale images on the...

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Thomas deHaas

Ohio Turfgrass Foundation (OTF) Conference and Tradeshow and OSU Green Industry Short Course

Looking to earn your recertification credits before the end of the year?  The Ohio Turfgrass Foundation Conference and Tradeshow and the Ohio State University Green Industry Short Course is a great educational opportunity. 

 

The conference is December 5 - 7, 2017 in Columbus at the Convention Center.  There will be plenty of opportunities to attend educational classes, earn a variety of credits and time to network.  Check out the show website including the educational sessions, tradeshow schedule, and registration information.  Pre-registration deadline is Tuesday,...

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Amy Stone
It's a Girl! (YUCK!) bennett.27 Fri, 11/03/2017 - 15:40

This tree has been around a little while in the Snyder Park Gardens and Arboretum.  In fact, it's one of my favorite trees.  It's such a popular tree in this garden that we even decided to move the location of a sidewalk while developing our master landscape design in order to preserve this tree.  However, now that it has revealed its identity, I am not sure what we will do.

 

Yes, this particular tree is a ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba) and it's a girl.  We had no idea.  For at least the last three years while we have been hanging out at this site, creating a landscape...

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Pam Bennett
It's Coming. Halloweeen Horrors chatfield.1 Mon, 10/30/2017 - 21:37

In a recent bygl-alert (https://bygl.osu.edu/node/944) I posed this challenge: More wicked (sometimes) plants this way shall come, culminating with Halloween, bygl alert-style. What are your candidates for the ultimate in plant wickedness? E-mail me at chatfield.1@osu.edu.

 

Or at least spookiness of some sort. Here are a few of your responses:

...
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Jim Chatfield
Disease, Demystified chatfield.1 Sun, 10/29/2017 - 10:49

What are control strategies for managing oak wilt disease? What do we know about beech leaf disease? Does rose rosette virus affect ‘Knockout’ roses? Which crabapples have good genetic resistance to apple scab disease and how does this compare to 20 years ago? Does apple scab on the fruit matter (as seen on the lead slide for this bygl-alert)?

 

...
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Jim Chatfield
Erik Draper
They're Baaack: Buckeyes! chatfield.1 Sat, 10/28/2017 - 14:20

While writing my bygl-alert on Aesculus parviflora yesterday afternoon, Joe Boggs was sending me photos: his latest bottlebrush buckeye beauties. I opened the message, and above and below are those images.

 

bottlebrush buckeye colony

Glorious fall! 

 

 

...

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Jim Chatfield
The Beauty of Bottlebrush Buckeye chatfield.1 Fri, 10/27/2017 - 16:48

My, oh my, buckeyes, oh my, the weekend beckons, but for now, let us praise Aesculus parviflora. “No better plant could be recommended as a lawn shrub”, according to W.J. Bean, as quoted in Michael Dirr’s Manual of Woody Landscape Plants. Bottlebrush buckeye, is my favorite shrub” from an unnamed source in Holden Arboretum’s Plant Profiles, probably Brian Parsons.

 

 

  I concur. Palmately compound leaves with 5-7 leaflets, lovely in spring, summer and fall. Multi-stemmed...

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Jim Chatfield
Fall Leaf Drop Reveals Calico Scale boggs.47 Wed, 10/25/2017 - 15:38
Calico Scale spends the summer as crawlers attached to the main veins on the underside of leaves. Detection can be a challenge with crawlers distributed on foliage throughout the canopy. However, as fall approaches, the crawlers move onto stems where they spend the winter. Clusters of crawlers coupled with blackened stems are key diagnostic features for detecting a calico scale infestation.
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Joe Boggs
Fabulous First Fall Foliage dehaas.2 Wed, 10/25/2017 - 07:54
Fall color is beginning in northeast Ohio. Although the Sugar Maples have not reached peak fall color, other plants including Sassafras, Sourwood, Black Tupelo, Staghorn Sumac, Burning Bush, and Dogwood have exploded in fall color.
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Thomas deHaas
Horticultural Horrors II chatfield.1 Sun, 10/22/2017 - 20:13
“Roses have thorns, and silver fountains mud; Clouds and eclipses stain both moon and sun, And loathsome canker lives in sweetest bud, All plants make faults.”
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Jim Chatfield
Terrapin Scale on Sycamore boggs.47 Sat, 10/21/2017 - 14:14
I posted a BYGL Alert last week extoling the virtues of one of my favorite native trees, American Sycamore [see, Ode to the Buttonwood Tree, October 18, 2017]. I came across a soft scale that I had never seen before on sycamore while taking pictures to illustrate the Alert. I would have included my find in the Alert, but it took me a while to settle on an identification.
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Joe Boggs
They're Heeeere! boggs.47 Fri, 10/20/2017 - 19:54
Boxelder Bugs were included along with several other notorious nuisance insects in my BYGL Alert titled, Fall Home Invaders are Poised to Enter (Sept. 30, 2017). They may have been poised then, but the bugs are now visiting homes en masse in southern Ohio. Indeed, I visited a home on Wednesday that was literally buggy with the bugs.
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Joe Boggs
ArborEATum: October 24 chatfield.1 Thu, 10/19/2017 - 16:09

  ArborEatum is just around the corner: next Tuesday, October 24. What fun it is: a friendly no-fee gathering of people who love to grow, culinaritize, eat, and drink various foods from landscapes and gardens. Come one come all to the Miller Pavilion at Ohio State University’s Secrest Arboretum, Tuesday, October 24, from 5:00 pm on. Eating and walking. Bring your offerings or just your appetites.

 

...
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Jim Chatfield
Horticultural Horrors I chatfield.1 Thu, 10/19/2017 - 11:23

  Friday the 13th has just passed and in some sort of dyslexic dystopia, the 31st is just around the corner and Halloween will soon arrive. So it seems only right to write of that which is wrong - or shall we say – wicked, as in Wicked Plants. There is an excellent book by just that title, Wicked Plants: The Weed That Killed Lincoln’s Mother and Other Botanical Atrocitiesby Amy Stewart. I recommend it, but for now, let us take a little trip into the world of some plants wicked this way come, through the house of horticultural horrors, guided by myself...

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Jim Chatfield
Ode to the Buttonwood Tree boggs.47 Wed, 10/18/2017 - 18:39
I often ask students in Master Gardener classes "what is a buttonwood tree?" to illustrate the challenge with common names of plants. Unlike scientific names, there is no recognized governing body that standardizes common names of plants. Consequently, plant names may vary widely (wildly?) owing to differences in the cultural backgrounds of people living in different geographical regions, among other things.
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Joe Boggs
Delayed Woolly Bear Crawl-About? boggs.47 Sat, 10/14/2017 - 10:50
Bristly "woolly bear" caterpillars commence their annual crawl-abouts in search of sheltered winter quarters in the fall; it's usually sometime in September in Ohio. They may be found on sidewalks, walking trails, roadways, or on the walls of homes and buildings. However, insects are sometimes made most noticeable by their absence.
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Joe Boggs
Magnolia Scale Update boggs.47 Mon, 10/09/2017 - 16:26
I first reported on Magnolia Scale (Neolecanium cornuparvum) this season in June when the maturing females were "puffing-up" and pumping out honeydew (see BYGL Alert, "Magnolia Scale is Pumping-Out Honeydew," June 16, 2017). My lengthy BYGL post included a description of the life-cycle for this "soft scale" as well as information on management options.
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Joe Boggs
Don't Pick That Scab! chatfield.1 Sun, 10/08/2017 - 23:27

As a committed crabarian, I cringe along with everyone when driving into a town or walking along a street and seeing the barren, defoliated canopies of certain crabapples this summer and now into the fall. Out darn scab! (double apologies to W.S.).

 

Apple scabSymptoms of apple scab on...
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Jim Chatfield
Osage Can You See boggs.47 Sat, 10/07/2017 - 09:42
Osage-Orange has long been one of my favorite trees. What's not to like? Grows anywhere, has glossy, dark green foliage and deeply fissured orangish-tan bark with great winter interest. Just don’t stand or park your car under female trees at this time of the year.
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Joe Boggs
Porcelain-Berry: The Next Kudzu? boggs.47 Fri, 10/06/2017 - 15:44
I spent a rewarding evening yesterday learning from members of the Cincinnati Chapter of the Professional Grounds Management Society (PGMS) while leading a diagnostic walk-about at Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum. Our first stop was to view a large oak sporting an "aerial display" of Porcelain-Berry.
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Joe Boggs
This is How You Do It! bennett.27 Wed, 10/04/2017 - 12:46

Need 100 one and a half gallon ornamental grasses planted?  Just put out an "all hands on deck" call to OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteers and they get the job done in  less than an hour!   This is exactly what we did in Clark County in order to complete our border planting in the Snyder Park Gardens and Arboretum (SPGA).  The border consists of more than 4000 daffodil bulbs, a river of daylillies and now Schizachyrium scoparium 'MinnblueA' or Blue Heaven little bluestem.  The idea is that after the spectacular daffodil bloom in the early spring, the bluestem will come up and help to...

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Pam Bennett
European Hornets Cause Concern boggs.47 Wed, 10/04/2017 - 10:26
At some point each season, I have come to expect receiving at least one phone call or e-mail message from a concerned Ohioan reporting they’ve found Giant Asian Hornets in our state. Although there have been no confirmed sightings of these hornets in North America, I never reject such reports out-of-hand.
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Joe Boggs
Aphid Outbreak boggs.47 Tue, 10/03/2017 - 19:17
I got a phone call from a homeowner in southwest Ohio who said they had an aphid problem on willows. They described the situation as huge numbers of aphids dropping from large willows onto their home, driveway, and barn; sticky "sap" raining down on everything; and all manner of things acquiring a blackened patina.
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Joe Boggs
Fall Home Invaders are Poised to Enter boggs.47 Sat, 09/30/2017 - 15:47
Now that fall is officially in the air, a number of insects and spiders are poised to make their way into Ohio homes. Indeed, with the recent spate of cool temperatures, I've gotten a few reports of gnat-like Hackberry Psyllids (Pachypsylla spp.) buzzing around homes and various spiders marching across floors.
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Joe Boggs
Seasonal Needle Drop in Full Swing boggs.47 Fri, 09/29/2017 - 13:12
I received a phone call yesterday from an Ohio landowner asking what was "killing" his Eastern white pine trees. Coincidentally, I was driving past a row of white pines with several trees looking pretty ragged owing to their normal shedding of inner needles at this time of the year. Although normal, it can sometimes be dramatically synchronous with all of the inner needles turning reddish-brown at once.
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Joe Boggs
Angel Trumpets Sound kulhanek.5 Wed, 09/27/2017 - 10:53

During a recent visit to Kingwood Center Gardens in Mansfield, I was treated to Angel Trumpets in bloom. These summer-fall bloomers make for spectacular late season WOW! For Ohio growers, these are tropical and frost tender. They would need to be brought in each winter as Kingwood Center does, however a big pot and some TLC might be worth it for these show-stoppers.

 

Angel’s Trumpets, Brugmansia spp., are woody shrubs or small trees with large pendulous flowers. These huge trumpet-shaped flowers in total can be a foot long and come in white, yellow, orange, red or...

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Ashley Kulhanek
An Introduction to the Pawpaw Experience boggs.47 Sat, 09/23/2017 - 12:58
My wife tasted her first pawpaw fruit yesterday which is hard to believe since she's been married to a native West Virginian for over 30 years. She loved it … the fruit; her West Virginian remains a day-to-day challenge.
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Joe Boggs
Revisiting Some Scaly Old Friends boggs.47 Fri, 09/22/2017 - 12:33
I spotted some "old friends" yesterday scurrying over the rock walls, on the sidewalks, and in the landscaping at the Civic Garden Center of Greater Cincinnati. If you're a herpetologist, you would call my "friends" European wall lizards. However, if you're a native Cincinnatian, you would likely identify these non-native lizards as "Lazarus lizards."
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Joe Boggs
Rachised Over The Coals chatfield.1 Fri, 09/22/2017 - 09:11

  Yesterday, I did a profile (https://bygl.osu.edu/node/924) of the lovely shining or winged sumac (Rhus copallinum) that include the following statement: “The wings on the stems are cool. BYGL-alert readers were true to their calling. Alarum Alarum, Alert Alert. Within minutes, John Swintosky of Louisville and Fred Robinson of northeast Ohionproperly and politely responded with corrections.

 

  John Swintosky e-mailed: The "winged stem" noted is better called winged rachis,...

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Jim Chatfield
Shining Sumac: A Shrub For Any Week chatfield.1 Thu, 09/21/2017 - 07:00

  Earlier this week, I visited Charles Tubesing, Plant Collections Curator of Holden Arboretum along with Joe Cochran, Director of Secrest Arboretum. Much more on that later, but for now I simply must push out a Shrub of Any Week shout-out for a native sumac: shining or winged sumac, Rhus copallinum (this specific epithet, instead of copallina seems to be preferred).

 

...
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Jim Chatfield
Fire Blight and Ornamental Pear, Good or Bad? dehaas.2 Wed, 09/20/2017 - 12:24
So this predicament begs to ask the question; is a pathogen on a potential invasive plant ‘Friend’ or ‘Foe’?
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Thomas deHaas
Perennial Plant of the Week - Leopard Plant stone.91 Tue, 09/19/2017 - 20:15

Do you have a shade garden? Are you looking for a fall blooming yellow flower with large leaves? Leopard plant (Ligularia dentata 'Othello') might be just the plant to consider. This herbaceous perennial is best grown in a humusy soil that is rich in organic matter. It preference is a medium to wet site that is in part shade to full shade. It is imperative that the site never fully dries out. Because of the need for moisture, this plant will benefit from a regular, deep watering during the summer, especially when temperature are high and Mother-Nature hasn't...

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Amy Stone

Along Came a Spider

Ohioans may be surprised by the large number of spiders living near at hand when heavy morning dews accentuate their gossamer creations. Their conspicuous web-work can be striking when highlighted by early morning sunlight along roadways.
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Joe Boggs

Woody Plant of the Week - Seven-Sons Flower

A recent walk through the Toledo Botanical Garden in Toledo, Ohio was simply enjoyable. Hints of fall colors and noticeable fruits were scattered throughout and were enjoyed by all. It was on the final leg of the walk, when the group turned the corner and white flowers immediately caught our attention. The blooms of the seven-sons flower (Heptacodium miconioides) were in their glory. It was the flowers that drew us in, but it was the pollinator activity that kept us watching. The insect activity was amazing.

...
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Amy Stone

Emerald Ash Borer University - Fall 2017

Interested in an emerald ash borer (EAB) update this fall? The fall-semester schedule of online EAB University classes have been scheduled. Classes can be viewed during an interactive live-session (see schedule times below), or viewed afterwards as a recorded session on the EABU YouTube Channel. In addition to EAB, there will be a session on Thousand Cankers Disease too! 

 

...
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Amy Stone

Ohio Pollinator Habitat Initiative - Annual Milkweed Pod Collection

Due to the drastic decline in monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) populations, the Ohio Pollinator Habitat Initiative (OPHI) and local Soil & Water Conservation Districts are again seeking public involvement to collect common (Asclepias syriaca) and swamp (Asclepias incarnata) milkweed seed pods from established plants September 1 through October 30, 2017. This is the second year they will be collecting seed pods.

 

The seeds will be used to establish new plantings and additional habitat for the monarch butterfly throughout the buckeye state...

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Amy Stone

Pawpaws and Amphbians: Out My Back Door

  I stepped out my back door on a balmy late summer Sunday, my, oh, my, what oh what did I see? No “giant doing cartwheels”, no “statue wearin' high heels”, no “tambourines and elephants playin’ in the band”, but yes a few “happy creatures dancing on the lawn”. “Doo, doo, doo”, what to see, “lookin’ out my back door?”

 

  1). Pawpaw (Asimina triloba) – see above image. Only last week I purchased and planted a new pawpaw seedling from Secrest Arboretum. I needed to since, even though our pawpaw tree bloomed for the past several years, and especially well this year,...

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Jim Chatfield

White Masses on Stems of Wafer-Ash, Redbud, and Other Trees

Participants in the S.W. Ohio BYGLive! Diagnostic Walk-About held this past Monday in the Boone County Arboretum (Union, KY) observed wafer-ash stems festooned with small, sticky, snowy-white masses. The masses could easily be mistaken for a soft scale, mealybug, or perhaps an insect egg mass. In fact, they are the "egg plugs" of the Two-Marked Treehopper (order Hemiptera; family Membracidae).
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Joe Boggs

Bullet Galls and Bullet-Like Stingers

Participants in last Friday's 84th Ohio Plant Diagnostic Workshop held in the OSU OARDC Secrest Arboretum braved experiencing bullet-like stings to view numerous bald-faced hornets buzzing Oak Bullet Galls. The galls were also drawing the attention of a few yellowjackets and other stinging insects as well as some flies and ants. Of course, the question on everyone's mind was why were these insects being drawn to the galls?
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Joe Boggs

Chestnut Sawfly Found on Hickory

Participants at last week's First Annual Tree and Plant Diagnostic Walkabout Workshop held in Lake Hope State Park in Vinton County, OH, came across a group of striking black-and-yellow striped sawfly larvae feeding on hickory. I had never see this sawfly before and after exhausting all of my usual routes for identifying tree pests, I followed the advice commonly given to me by seeking professional help.
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Joe Boggs
Bent Science Salon: Weird Things in the Woods chatfield.1 Thu, 09/07/2017 - 14:16

  Come one, come all. The Bent Science Salon officially opens in two weeks, on Thursday, September 21 at 7:00pm. First up: Weird Things in the Woods, channeled through a Weird Thing himself, yours truly, Jim Chatfield. This is only the first of these salons, continuing on the third Thursday of every month: next will be Dan Herms on Plant Phenology (Not Phrenology) and Climate Change, on October 19.

 

...
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Jim Chatfield
Stinging Caterpillar Commentary boggs.47 Thu, 09/07/2017 - 14:14
I learned a valuable lesson during last week's First Annual Tree and Plant Diagnostic Walkabout Workshop held in the beautiful Lake Hope State Park in Vinton County, OH. If you want to find caterpillars, you should hike with Tom Macy, Forest Health Program Administer, with the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Forestry. Tom's cater-optic prowess is truly remarkable.
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Joe Boggs
Gomphocarpus; The Balloon Plant chatfield.1 Thu, 09/07/2017 - 13:53
he late-season handiwork of the Basswood Leafroller (Pantographa limata, family Crambidae (Crambid Snout Moths)) clearly describes the unusual leaf-abodes created by this moth caterpillar. Individual translucent green caterpillars reside inside cigar-like nests created in a repeating three step process.
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Jim Chatfield
More Beech Diagnostics chatfield.1 Mon, 08/28/2017 - 17:07

American beech (Fagus grandifolia) is one of our most elegant woodland and parkland trees; it puts the sylvan in silviculture. There are many problems afoot, however, both large and small.

 

  For this alert, though, let us set aside the death and life realities of killer beech bark disease and the Boggsian itty-bitty bite/peench story of the beech blight (boogie-woogie) aphids (http://bygl.osu.edu/node/883). Let us look at...

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Jim Chatfield
Redbud Leaffolder Trekking Through Generations boggs.47 Mon, 08/28/2017 - 14:51
Last season, the unusual leaf symptoms caused by the Redbud Leaffolder on its namesake host were observed throughout Ohio. Questions regarding leaves turning brown after being folded over or "glued" together continued to come into Extension offices throughout September. This could be a repeat season based on what I've seen so far.
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Joe Boggs
Attack of the Boogie-Woogie Aphids boggs.47 Mon, 08/28/2017 - 12:06
I posted a BYGL Alert on Beech Blight Aphids late last month and described their peculiar behavior that earns them the alternate common name of the "boogie-woogie aphid." I also noted they can be aggressive and will mass attack a threat. But, I didn't have first-hand experience with this behavior until this past Friday.
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Joe Boggs
O Dodder, Where Art Thou? chatfield.1 Sun, 08/27/2017 - 13:19

  Well, on a recent odyssey to Pennsylvania, dodder was along a streamside bank, in small amounts amongst a lot of knot. Dodder as in Cuscata, a parasitic plant in the Convolvulaceae (morning glory family). Knot as in Japanese knotweed, or Fallopia japonica, touted as one of the most pervasive invasive weeds in the eastern United States.

 

...

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Jim Chatfield
Coneflower Cleanup boggs.47 Sun, 08/27/2017 - 11:59
Coneflowers have long been one my favorites in landscapes and naturalized areas because of their attractiveness to pollinators of all sorts. Of course, this is the time of the season when we may walk away from them as they start looking pretty rough. However, we should continue to focus our attention on detecting and managing two serious problems that will only get worse next season
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Joe Boggs
Unusual Plant-Eating Cockroach boggs.47 Thu, 08/24/2017 - 17:39
I came across an unusual cockroach while visiting a greenhouse last week in southwest Ohio. The Australian Cockroach is a tropical species that will feed on and damage plants; they do not confine their appetites to the "normal" table fare associated with cockroaches found in Ohio. Indeed, I spoke to a former IPM specialist for an eastern conservatory who told me they suffered significant losses of seedlings and rooted cuttings from these cockroaches.
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Joe Boggs
Bagworms in the Bag boggs.47 Thu, 08/24/2017 - 12:12
This has been an active season for Common Bagworms in Ohio with heavy localized populations observed in many areas of the state. Thankfully, the damage caused by these caterpillars wrapped in silk bags festooned with host plant debris is drawing to a close. A high percentage of bagworms in Ohio have now tied their bags to anchorage points and closed their bags' openings in preparation for pupation.
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Joe Boggs
Curtis E. Young
Anltions are the Pits boggs.47 Thu, 08/24/2017 - 11:02
I was thrilled to come across the conical pits of Antlions yesterday; the handiwork of one of my favorite insects. I had become concerned that above average rainfall this season had drowned-out a robust year for these fascinating predators. However, the localized population in the home landscaping I visited appeared to be very healthy with pits in several locations.
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Joe Boggs
Wheel Bugs are Rolling Along boggs.47 Tue, 08/22/2017 - 14:57
Wheel bug nymphs are completing their development and the adults of these large, unusual looking bugs are beginning to lurk among the leaves of trees and shrubs in Ohio in search of prey. Although caterpillars and sawfly larvae are favored table fare of this impressively large predator, they will not turn their beaks up at other arthropod meat morsels.
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Joe Boggs
Botany in a Box chatfield.1 Tue, 08/22/2017 - 00:59

This past weekend my wife Laura came inside with a Botany in a Box she had collected and arranged from our backyard, a delightful mixture of flowers and miniature eggplants and melons, kousa dogwood fruits, crabapples, Korean maple fruits and more treasures. It is for her new 2nd grade class that started Monday.

 

  It reminded me of the simple joys of collecting and sharing these miniaturizations of horticultural and woodland nature. So, along with her welcome for her students, here are a few thoughts from an Akron Beacon Journal article I wrote eight years ago, with a box...

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Jim Chatfield
Garden Spider Orb Weavers boggs.47 Mon, 08/21/2017 - 13:26
This is the time of the year when many species of spiders in Ohio begin to reach their maximum size as they fully mature. Two of our larger native spiders are the Black and Yellow Garden Spider and its similarly showy cousin, the Banded Garden Spider. Both belong to the orb weaver family (Araneidae), so named because of their flat, circular webs
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Joe Boggs
Leaf-Footed Bugs boggs.47 Sat, 08/19/2017 - 08:49
Leaf-footed bugs (family Coreidae) are rife with discrepancies. Their name is based on leaf-like expansions of their hind tibia, not their "feet;" however, many species lack the leaf-like feature. The family name Coreidae is derived from the Ancient Greek word for bedbug; however, bedbugs belong to a different family, Cimicidae. They are not called stink bugs (Family Pentatomidae), but some do stink.
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Joe Boggs
Diagnostics: Now and in September chatfield.1 Sat, 08/19/2017 - 08:26
Diagnostics – why good plants go bad – is a big part of what we do at OSU Extension and a key skill for all horticulturists. I was doing a walkabout yesterday at the Secrest Arboretum just outside my office in Wooster, OH and took a few pictures.
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Jim Chatfield
Joe Boggs
Lake County Field Day chatfield.1 Thu, 08/17/2017 - 18:25

Last week the Nursery Growers of Lake County Ohio (NGLCO) put on their 50th Summer Field Day at the lovely Chalet Debonne Winery. This event is always a great time to network, rediscover old friends and make new friends. And to see plants – and even owls.  Here are a few visual highlights.

 

  In addition to the hibiscus above there is the always colorful Garden Guru Charles Behnke, former and ever OSU Extension Agent.  Charles was chatting with Bob Froelich, Ornamental Specialist, newly with BayerCrop Science. Bob noted that Bayer and the aspirin-ish logo is the second...

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Jim Chatfield
Fall Webworm Update and More Red-Heads Found boggs.47 Thu, 08/17/2017 - 12:36
Fall Webworm has two generations per season in Ohio. The "fall" in the webworm's common name is based on the appearance of second generation nests late in the season. First generation nests began to appear in southern Ohio in late May and second generation caterpillars are now on the scene. Localized fall webworm populations are high throughout the state with nests becoming more evident as they undergo late-season expansion.
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Joe Boggs
Must See - Pollinator Quick Guides stone.91 Thu, 08/17/2017 - 09:48
There is a lot of "buzz" on bees and other pollinators in the news. People are interested and want to know what they can do to help the cause. 
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Amy Stone
Trumbull Trail Test For You chatfield.1 Wed, 08/16/2017 - 17:04

  Yesterday, I visited Lee Beers, the OSU Extension Agriculture and Natural Resource educator in Trumbull County, and as plant lovers (Lee is finishing his PhD on lowbush blueberry physiology and genetics), we had to take a walk. Adjacent to the OSU, Trumbull County office is county land and the Mosquito Lake State Park. So, in this 48-hour flash quiz, a prize awaits for the person with the most correct answers in that time to the plant and pest photo questions from our walk. If ties; the very first top score shall prevail.  

 

  Let us begin with pictures of fruits,...

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Jim Chatfield
WIldflower of the Week chatfield.1 Tue, 08/15/2017 - 17:51

Last weekend, at a lovely wedding weekend for my wife’s cousin’s daughter and beau in the Leelanau peninsula area of west-central Michigan, some of us took a pre-wedding walk to Pyramid Point near Lake Michigan. The views up the short trail to the summit were spectacular. Descending to the trailhead, off to the side of the trail in a meadow area was a – very cool herbaceous flower.

 

...
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Jim Chatfield
2018 Gypsy Moth Suppression Applications Due September 1, 2017 stone.91 Tue, 08/15/2017 - 16:15

If you are seeing gypsy moth egg masses and are interested in learning if the area could qualify to be part of the ODA Gypsy Moth Suppression Program, here are some details.

Treatment criteria:

  • Proposed block must be located in a county that has been designated quarantine for gypsy moth by ODA. See map below.  Counties in red are in the quarantine.

...
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Amy Stone
Peony Measles chatfield.1 Mon, 08/14/2017 - 13:55

Cultivate your own garden, said Voltaire at the end of Candide.  Looking homeward, I note that peony measles, first seen in mid-July has continued to develop.  Measles, or red spot or leaf blotch or Cladosporium leaf blotch disease are alternative names for this fungal disease. It is caused by, you guessed it, Cladosporium paeoniae or, who knew, with its new moniker, Dicholocladosporium chlorocephalum. 

 

  On the upper leaf surface, reddish and brownish “measles”-like spots develop earlier in summer, now coalescing into purple blotches...

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Jim Chatfield
Tree of The Week: Hackberries Excel in Amherst chatfield.1 Sun, 08/13/2017 - 13:41

I admit that in the old days I thought of hackberry (Celtis) mostly as a common mid-sized native woodland tree, adaptable to variable soil types, but not so much as a landscape plant. Counter to this, Davis Sydnor always extolled hackberries, especially Celtis laevigata (sugarberry), but also common hackberry (Celtis occidentalis). I am now becoming educated, Davis.  

 

...

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Jim Chatfield
Mosquito Alert boggs.47 Sat, 08/12/2017 - 11:21
I was amazed last week at the cloud of mosquitoes buzzing in my wake as I hiked in a wooded park in southwest Ohio. Studies have shown that the relative attractiveness of individuals to mosquitoes varies and I've never been very attractive to mosquitoes. However, the enormous swarm following me through the woods could have been organizing an airlift operation!
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Joe Boggs
Weed of the Week: Dayflowers Not So Common chatfield.1 Sat, 08/12/2017 - 08:19

In the ChatScape there is a lovely little flower, the Asiatic dayflower, Commelina communis, which has taken advantage of our travels this summer, invading any number of garden sites. It is well-known to move into “disturbed” sites, which may say something of this laissez-faire gardener, if not my wife. This herbaceous wanderer has quite a storied profile, from its two sky-blue petals subtended by one small white petal to the use of its blue pigments in Japanese dyes for woodcuts.

 

  Dayflower is studied for possible bioremediation for removing toxic levels of...

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Jim Chatfield
Going on an Egg Hunt - Gypsy Moth Style! stone.91 Sat, 08/12/2017 - 07:07

The gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) is a non-native invasive species. This insect is currently in the egg mass stage, and will be in this stage until next spring when the caterpillars will hatch and begin feeding. Egg masses can help predict what population levels could be for the upcoming season. Now is the time to look for egg masses. Egg masses can be found almost anywhere. While we tend to look on trees, they can be found on homes, sheds, trailers, dog houses, bird houses, on firewood, on fences, yard art and signs. Egg masses can also be hidden under loose bark or in tree...

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Amy Stone
Robber Flies: Insect Fighter Jets! boggs.47 Fri, 08/11/2017 - 17:17
One of my favorite insects is the Red-Footed Cannibalfly which is a type of robber fly (family Asilidae). Few carnivorous insects can match the amazing acrobatics and predatory proficiency of robber flies in their pursuit of prey. Adults of all species are predators and they will attack a variety of insects; even "armed" prey and insects much larger than their own body size.
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Joe Boggs
Monarchs vs. Tussocks boggs.47 Fri, 08/11/2017 - 14:37
I've received two e-mail message this week asking for a recommendation to control native Milkweed Tussock Moth caterpillars feeding on their namesake host. The senders were well-meaning Monarch Butterfly enthusiasts who were concerned the tussocks were eating the monarchs out of house and home.
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Joe Boggs
Did You Give or Receive on Tuesday? stone.91 Thu, 08/10/2017 - 13:22

Did you know that Tuesday, August 8th was "Sneak A Zucchini on Your Neighbor's Front Porch Day"? Did you sneak, or did you get snuck upon? Didn't participate this year?  Be sure it is on the calendar for 2018! 

 

While this is a fun thing to do, it is important to remember if you have excess fruits and vegetables this time of the year, it is a great opportunity to share your bountiful harvest with others.  A simple sharing can occur neighbor-to-neighbor, among friends and family members, or excess produce can be donated food banks, kitchens or pantries.  Different...

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Amy Stone
White Grub Management boggs.47 Thu, 08/10/2017 - 12:57
This has been one of the most prolific seasons for Japanese beetles in Ohio for many years. High localized populations were observed throughout the state. Adult populations of both Northern and Southern Masked Chafers, two of our other common "white grub producing" beetles, were also very high this season, particularly in the central and southern parts of Ohio.
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Joe Boggs
Dave Shetlar
Time to Tidy Up the Perennial Garden bennett.27 Tue, 08/08/2017 - 14:09
Most of the perennials in my garden have bloomed a little earlier than normal.  Here it is almost the second week in August and I am seeing the late August perennials such as Sedum and goldenrod start to bloom.  It's also time for me to do a little cleaning up in the gardens, especially with those plants that have finished blooming such as Echinacea (coneflowers), Nepeta (catmint) and others.
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Pam Bennett
Linden ID chatfield.1 Sun, 08/06/2017 - 23:36

It’s Sunday night, I check my e-mail, and Frank Sinibaldi asks: “Mr. Chatfield, can you tell me what tree this comes from?”  I check out the attached image, and there it is: a linden bract with attached peduncle, pedicels and fruits.

 

  So, linden (Tilia spp.) is the tree. Common lindens are the American linden or basswood (Tilia americana), littleleaf linden (Tilia cordata) native to Europe and into Asia, and the hybrid Crimean linden Tilia x euchlora).  Lindens are much bee-beloved.

 

...
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Jim Chatfield
A Plant Walk in Wooster chatfield.1 Sun, 08/06/2017 - 12:58

The great thing for all of us as plant lovers is the simplicity of enjoyment of a walk in the woods or through city streets, checking out the plants we know. Here are some snapshots of just a few plant sightings on an afternoon walk in Wooster, Ohio a few days ago.

 

  First, as our lead photo, at the edge of a parking lot was Calycanthus, which a Clemson fact sheet notes has common names of Carolina allspice, strawberry-bush, sweet bubby {my favorite}, sweet Betsy, and spicebush {my least favorite since we think of Lindera benzoin as spicebush up North...

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Jim Chatfield
Crepe Myrtles For Ohio chatfield.1 Thu, 08/03/2017 - 07:33
While in Maryland and Virginia recently our Extension Nursery Landscape and Turf Team of diagnosticians admired crepe myrtles (Lagerstroemia indica) in whites, reds, and lavenders.  Absolutely gorgeous trees for their flower displays and their attractive bark.
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Jim Chatfield
Quiz Results: Name That Pine chatfield.1 Mon, 07/31/2017 - 22:19

What a great response to our Name That Pine query posed last Friday. There were dozens of responses, some on Friday and Saturday, and then again a number today, Monday July 31. At first, this bimodal response rate puzzled me until I realized that some of you do not get bygl-alerts, our just-in-time alerts to your phone via e-mails, vs. the Monday summary of the previous weeks alerts. 

 

 How can you possibly not want to be alerted by phone the very moment that we ask for your pine ID skills and other matters!!! Well, it is imaginable, but if you do want to get those alerts...

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Jim Chatfield
Ohio Local Foods Week stone.91 Fri, 07/28/2017 - 22:00
What does local foods mean to you? While there is not one definition for “local” food - it is very personal and can vary from person to person. Some people are able to grow their own food. Others grow some food, and also support local producers by purchasing food from them.  And still others only purchase local foods from local producers. 
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Amy Stone
Name That Pine chatfield.1 Fri, 07/28/2017 - 09:46
True pines, as opposed to say, Norfolk Island-pine (Araucaria heterophylla) or Japanese umbrella-pine (Sciadopitys verticillata) are in the genus Pinus, which differs from other genera in the Pinaceae family. Other genera in the family include, for example, spruces (Picea), firs (Abies), and hemlocks (Tsuga).
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Jim Chatfield
Step Away From the Mimosa! draper.15 Thu, 07/27/2017 - 16:55

As we continue traveling south to Washington DC, we were moseying along some backroads in Virginia and suddenly the camera crew began yelling “stop the van… pull over”.  We piled out to run over trying to position ourselves to take photos of a HUGE Albizia julibrissin, commonly known as Mimosa or Persian Silk tree.

 

...
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Erik Draper
Jim Chatfield
Another Leafminer of Black Locust young.2 Thu, 07/27/2017 - 16:25

On July 22, 2017, Joe Boggs wrote a BYGL Alert on the "flaming" of black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) by the locust leafminer beetle (Odontota dorsalis) in certain areas of Ohio.  These "flamed" trees are easily observed along highways from southeast to northeast Ohio. Interestingly, Curtis Young and Amy Stone in Northwest Ohio seldom see any evidence of locust leafminer beetle.  They have to travel east to at least Mansfield, Ohio before seeing the activities of this leafminer and it isn't because of a lack of black locust trees. 

...
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Curtis E. Young
Sassafras: Simply Fruitful chatfield.1 Thu, 07/27/2017 - 11:28

In a previous Tree of the Week, I featured sassafras, but noted that I did not have an image of their very cool-looking fruits, though I once did have said image. I figured that I had electronically misplaced or that it was from all the way back in the Kodachrome Slide Era (somewhere between the Dirt Age and the Middle-Age Anthropocene).  So…

 

Voila. I have seen bright carmine red fruits, and here you can see both the early speckled green phase and cool grape-Kool Aid purple. Sassafras, a lovely native tree.

 

...

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Jim Chatfield
NW Ohio Green Industry Summer Session stone.91 Thu, 07/27/2017 - 09:43
It is not too late to attend the 2017 Green Industry Summer Session at Owens Community College in NW Ohio.  The annual event is held the first Wednesday of August.  This year the event is held August 2nd.  Registration begins at 11:00 am with a boxed lunch, with the first session starting at 11:45 am.  The event concludes at 4:15 pm with opportunities to earn ISA, ODA and OCVN credits. 
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Amy Stone
The Other Guignardia... draper.15 Wed, 07/26/2017 - 13:37
Joe Boggs wrote a great article “Guignardia Leaf Blotch Running Rampant” the other day, which caused me to reflect on another Guignardia fungus often ignored, but very important.  The other Guignardia, Guignardia bidwellii, is one responsible for causing the disease Black Rot of Grape.
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Erik Draper
Curtis E. Young
Upcoming Programs, Oh My chatfield.1 Wed, 07/26/2017 - 12:52
Here are a few upcoming programs to get on your calendars. Registration information to come on websites soon.  All are at Secrest Arboretum at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster, except for the Bent Science salons at the Bent Ladder Cider and Winery outside Doylestown, Ohio, and the Why Trees Matter program, at the College of Wooster.  
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Jim Chatfield
Harlequin Bug on Cleome young.2 Wed, 07/26/2017 - 12:50

The harlequin bug (Murgantia histrionica) (a.k.a. calico bug, fire bug or harlequin cabbage bug) is a black stink bug with either yellow-orange or red markings on both its back and stomach. Additionally, there are some white markings around the edge of its abdomen.  As with all true stink bugs, it belongs to the family Pentatomidae.

 

...
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Curtis E. Young
Annual of the Week - Sunflower 'Birds & Bees' stone.91 Wed, 07/26/2017 - 09:06

 

 

Sunflower Helianthus annuus ‘Birds & Bees’

 

While at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Garden in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, there was a sunflower in their vegetable garden that caught my attention. ‘Birds & Bees’ is a 6 – 8’ tall sunflower that has golden-yellow petals and chocolate discs.

 

While flowering, sunflowers offer a pollen and nectar source for foraging honey bees, native bees and many other garden pollinators. At maturity, these black seeded sunflowers of ‘Birds & Bees’ provide oil-rich kernels. The shells...

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Amy Stone
Perennial of the Week: There is More to a Plant Than Just the Name - Joe Pye Weed stone.91 Wed, 07/26/2017 - 08:52

When a plant has “weed” as part of its name, it could cause a little bit of confusion. As a gardener, would you feel as you could really brag and be proud of a plant in the landscape that is called a weed? Well of course the answer is yes, especially if it is Joe pye weed (Eutrochium purpureum).  Brag away!  

 

While Joe pye weed (Eutrochium purpureum) can be observed growing along roadsides, some have never taken in to consideration its outstanding ornamental characteristics. It is a large plant which needs space, but when planted in mass it can provide...

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Amy Stone
A Non-Native Crayfish in Southwest Ohio boggs.47 Tue, 07/25/2017 - 14:53
I came across a large die-off of crayfish last week in Gilmore Ponds, a Butler County MetroPark in southwest Ohio. While investigating, I learned that the crayfish is the (Louisiana) Red Swamp Crayfish; a species that is non-native to Ohio. However, this crayfish is well known to anyone who has enjoyed crawfish etouffee.
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Joe Boggs
Guignardia Leaf Blotch Running Rampant boggs.47 Tue, 07/25/2017 - 10:38
Our continual wet weather over much of Ohio this season has been a two-edged sword. On one hand, we haven't had to drag hoses to water our landscapes. On the other hand, a number of fungal plant pathogens that require wet conditions to infect and produce their associated diseases are running rampant. Such is obviously the case for Guignardia aesculi; the fungus responsible for Guignardia Leaf Blotch of Aesculus.
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Joe Boggs
Shrub of the Week: Japanese Kerria chatfield.1 Mon, 07/24/2017 - 17:15
I checked out the jumbled, zigzagging  branches of my Japanese kerria (Kerria japonica) planting the other day, and to my surprise a few random blooms of bright yellow had emerged. Kerria puts its best bloom show forward in late April in northeast Ohio, just after the forsythia fades. But, July, who knew?
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Jim Chatfield
Plants of the Beehive State chatfield.1 Sun, 07/23/2017 - 20:41
This past week I was in the Beehive State, Utah, first speaking at a conference and then for a bit of vacation. My wife and I visited both the red rock and desert areas in southern Utah and then in the north, the more verdant areas of the Uinta and Wasatch mountain ranges. Utah, which became the 45th state in 1896, was named the Beehive State for the hard-working, industrious inhabitants.
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Jim Chatfield
Annual Flaming of Black Locust Trees boggs.47 Fri, 07/21/2017 - 20:10
Jim Chatfield called me from the road this morning to report seeing "flamed" black locusts along a highway in northeast Ohio. The captivating reddish-brown leaf coloration caused by the native Locust Leafminer Beetle is often a familiar sight to travelers motoring on Ohio's interstate highways. Indeed, when beetle populations are high during "outbreak years," black locust trees are able to be identified at highway speeds because of their blow-torched appearance.
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Joe Boggs
Jim Chatfield
Monarchs vs. Aphids boggs.47 Fri, 07/21/2017 - 15:42
What are those hordes of yellow aphids sucking juices from common milkweed "reserved" for monarch butterfly caterpillars? They are Oleander Aphids and their appearance on milkweeds reminds us that nature makes no food reservations. This non-native aphid may be found sucking juices from over 50 hosts belonging to 16 plant families.
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Joe Boggs
Return Engagement of Boogie-Woogie Aphids boggs.47 Thu, 07/20/2017 - 16:10
David Gressley (Director of Horticulture, Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum) sent me a video yesterday morning of a chorus line of Beech Blight Aphids (Grylloprociphilus imbricator) shaking their woolly derrieres in a synchronous samba. Frankly, I believe no other insect upstages this aphid in entertainment value.
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Joe Boggs
Pine Cones on Willow? boggs.47 Wed, 07/19/2017 - 15:20
The improbable looking but appropriately named Willow Pinecone Galls are now large enough to be very noticeable on their namesake host. As the common name suggests, the galls closely resemble pine cones with closed seed scales. They are produced on willow by a gall-midge but cause little damage to the overall health of their namesake host.
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Joe Boggs
Two Cats on the Prowl boggs.47 Tue, 07/18/2017 - 18:01
Two general defoliators are producing damage in southwest Ohio: yellownecked caterpillars and walnut caterpillars. Both of these caterpillars feed in groups, or "colonies," of 10-30 individuals throughout their development which is why their defoliation is often focused on a single branch or a group of adjoining branches. However, it's also why multiple colonies can quickly defoliate small trees.
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Joe Boggs
Dogbane Discoveries boggs.47 Tue, 07/18/2017 - 16:02
Dogbane is the representative species for the dogbane family, Apocynaceae, which includes milkweeds and other plants that ooze milky sap ladened with poisonous alkaloids. Indeed, Apocynum translates to "poisonous to dogs," or "dog killer." Sap from the plant is reported to have been used against ravenous feral dogs.
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Joe Boggs
Check out The OSU Cultivar Trials in VR Mode rhodus.1 Mon, 07/17/2017 - 13:14
For 2017, a new program is available at the Ohio State University Cultivar Trial garden that offers a 360˙ panorama tour for anyone who uses a computer, cell phone, tablet or  a VR headset.
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Tim Rhodus
Act Now to Control White Pine Weevil boggs.47 Mon, 07/17/2017 - 12:58
White pine weevil larval feeding damage is now evident throughout Ohio. Look for brown, wilted main shoots (terminal leaders) with the tips sometimes curved into a "shepherd’s crook." There is one generation per year and localized populations may be reduced by removing and destroying the infested terminals before new adult weevils emerge.
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Joe Boggs
Gallignostics chatfield.1 Mon, 07/17/2017 - 10:21

  Let us call this A Case of Gallignostics. Plant galls are defined as abnormal plant growths caused by a gall-maker; the gall-maker being certain insects, mites, fungi, and bacteria. From horned oak gall to bacterial crown gall, from maple bladder galls to cedar-apple rust galls, there are many galls of interest to horticulturists. Relative to all this, Joe Boggs recently got an e-mail from Michael Goldman of the Grange Insurance Audubon Center:

 

  I'm a big fan of the BYGL, and found something here that might be interesting for it.  The pictures I took look like some...

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Jim Chatfield
Joe Boggs
A Stinging Commentary on Wasps, Yellowjackets, and Baldfaced Hornets. boggs.47 Sat, 07/15/2017 - 13:07
Paper Wasps, Yellowjackets, and Baldfaced Hornets are beneficial insects. Just keep repeating that to yourself when you're being chased or stung by these hymenopteran marauders! They’ve been with us since the beginning of the season. However, this is the time of the year when their ever-expanding nests become large enough and contain enough individuals to make their presence sometimes painfully known.
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Joe Boggs
Chainsaw Safety - Level One stone.91 Fri, 07/14/2017 - 19:38
Aug 3, 2017, 8:00am CSAW Level 1 - A full 8 hour class with a lecture portion in the morning and a hands-on portion in the afternoon.
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Amy Stone
Kathy Smith
Diagnostic Workshop: What's Wrong With My Tree? stone.91 Fri, 07/14/2017 - 19:30

Workshop Name:  Tree Diagnostic Workshop - What’s Wrong With My Tree?

 

Workshop Date:  Friday, August 4, 2017

 

Event Location:  Ohio State University Mansfield, 100 Ovalwood Hall, 1760 University Drive, Mansfield, Ohio

 

This Ohio Woodland Stewards Program spends the day with Extension specialists to diagnose some common and not so common tree problems. Learn what trees need immediate attention from what is just cosmetic and won’t compromise the health of the tree. 

 

Ask questions and get answers and find...

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Amy Stone
Kathy Smith
Creeping Flecks of Gold and Animated Piles of Frass boggs.47 Fri, 07/14/2017 - 14:21
Look closely at the leaves of ornamental sweet potatoes, morning glories, or bindweed for flecks of gold creeping across the lower leaf surfaces; those would be Golden Tortoise Beetles (Charidotella sexpunctata). They are also called “sweet potato beetles” because of their common occurrence on both cultivated and ornamental sweet potatoes and “goldbugs” because of their appearance.
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Joe Boggs
Trefoil Foiling Lawns, Landscapes, and Naturalized Areas boggs.47 Fri, 07/14/2017 - 11:20
The bright yellow floral display currently blanketing some lawns and roadway right-of-ways is being produced by Birdsfoot Trefoil. The yellow flowers are smaller than dandelion flowers, bigger than those of black medic, and resemble buttercups from a distance. This non-native plant was imported with good intentions, but is now gaining weed status in lawns, landscapes, and naturalized areas in Ohio. Yet another example of unintended consequences with introducing non-natives.
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Joe Boggs
Killers Welcome Cicada Emergence boggs.47 Thu, 07/13/2017 - 15:29
Annual Dog-Day Cicadas emerging in southwest Ohio are being “welcomed” by their nemesis, Cicada Killer Wasps. This is the largest wasp found in Ohio and the annual cicadas are their select prey. An abrupt halt in the buzzing of a cicada, often punctuated by a high-pitched screech, usually means a wasp has committed an insecticidal act
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Joe Boggs
A Tale of Two Bagworms chatfield.1 Wed, 07/12/2017 - 08:05

Tale of Two Bagworms

  As the BoggMan writeth, early bagworm damage is oft overlooked, with skeletonization injury passed off as Japanese beetle injury or other chewing insect damage. This was driven home to me last week as I checked out some elm street trees in Orrville.

 

...
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Jim Chatfield
Coneflower Calamities boggs.47 Tue, 07/11/2017 - 18:15
Participants at yesterday’s S.W. Ohio Diagnostic Walk-About viewed two problems on purple coneflowers; one potentially more calamitous than the other. The first was the handiwork of the Sunflower Head-Clipping Weevil (Haplorhynchites aeneus) which included dangling seed heads and stems that looked like soda straws. The second were stunted plants and deformed plant parts caused by the phytoplasma disease known as Aster Yellows.
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Joe Boggs
Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) Quarantine Expansion boggs.47 Tue, 07/11/2017 - 14:24
Quarantines are a primary tool in preventing the spread of Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) (Anoplophora glabripennis) in Ohio and elsewhere in North America. They stop the beetle from hitchhiking to new locations in infested materials such as logs, firewood, pruned branches, etc. Yesterday, the ODA, ODNR, and USDA APHIS announced an expansion of the ALB quarantine in Clermont County, OH.
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Joe Boggs
Weed of the Week - Oriental Bittersweet stone.91 Thu, 07/06/2017 - 10:59
There is nothing "sweet" about Oriental bittersweet. This non-native species appears to be popping up, and then growing up, in NW Ohio. While it was an occasional invader in natural areas, forests and fence lines, more and more people are having to manage this invasive species.
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Amy Stone
More Japanese Beetle Abounding stone.91 Thu, 07/06/2017 - 10:22
Earlier this week, Joe Boggs reported localized high populations of Japanese beetles via a BYGL Alert, Japanese Beetles Abound - http://bygl.osu.edu/node/811  The report included excellent photos and on the ground reports from BYGL readers. 
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Amy Stone
Bountiful Bagworm Blunder boggs.47 Wed, 07/05/2017 - 21:18
I drove past four upright European hornbeams (Carpinus betulus ‘Fastigiata’) today that were riddled with Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica) damage; or so I thought. However, bagworms are sneaky feeders; their damage may be blamed on other pests.
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Joe Boggs
Japanese Beetles Abound boggs.47 Wed, 07/05/2017 - 18:45
I probably don’t need to post a BYGL Alert! to make you aware that we are seeing large numbers of Japanese Beetles (Popillia japonica) in Ohio this season; you have no doubt seen them for yourselves. In fact, some of you have literally run into the beetles.
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Joe Boggs
Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) Workshop boggs.47 Wed, 07/05/2017 - 17:07
The Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) is potentially the most devastating non-native pest to have ever arrived in North America. The beetle kills trees belonging to 12 genera and, if it escapes eradication, ALB would cause a catastrophic loss of trees. Early detection is essential to eradication success. Learn how you can help stop ALB!
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Joe Boggs
Perennial of the Week - Liatris stone.91 Tue, 07/04/2017 - 08:55

 

Commonly called blazing star or gayfeather, this perennial produces tall spikes of bright purple flowers that resemble bottlebrushes above the green strap-like foliage. This perennial is in the Asteraceae family and there are 32 species that occur throughout much of North America from southern Canada to northern Mexico.

 

The individual flowers open from the top to the bottom, unlike most plants that open from the bottom upward as the spike develops.  Flowers of this perennial act like insect magnets - attracting both bees and butterflies.  Flower spikes can also...

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Amy Stone
Summertime...And Flowers Are Boooming chatfield.1 Mon, 07/03/2017 - 23:16

Emerson says: The Earth laughs in flowers.  Springtime, though, is when we tend to think of such mirth.   Summer is now our season, yet floral beauty continues to reign. Following are five of the boys and girls of summer.

 

 

  Above is the spectacular and aromatic flower of Stewartia, a member of the camellia family (Theaceae), photographed at Secrest Arboretum where Joe Cochran, Paul Snyder, Matt Shultzman, and the legacy of Kenny Cochran, hanuve resulted in numerous stewartias planted in recent years.

 

 

  Next, is...

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Jim Chatfield
Squirrels Debarking Trees: Part 2 boggs.47 Mon, 07/03/2017 - 17:24
Thanks to Tim Turner who is truly an alert BYGL Alert! reader, I can provide some new information on the “Calcium Hypothesis.” In my BYGL Alert! posted this morning, I cited a scientific paper published in 2016 that proposed squirrels are stripping bark to acquire calcium from the phloem tissue. The authors of the paper tagged this explanation for bark-stripping as the “Calcium Hypothesis.”
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Joe Boggs
Oak Leaf Blister Disease chatfield.1 Sun, 07/02/2017 - 19:50

  Oak leaf blister, a fungal disease caused by Taphrina caerulescens, is widespread this year on a range of oak species, both in the white oak and red oak groups. Symptoms include raised, blistered, greenish-yellow spots on upper leaf surfaces and darker, corresponding sunken spots on lower leaf surfaces, though sometimes the raised and sunken aspects may be obscured. Fungal growth can sometimes be seen on undersurfaces of leaves.

 

...
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Jim Chatfield
Squirrels Debarking Trees boggs.47 Sun, 07/02/2017 - 13:50
Over the weekend, I received an e-mail message from a landowner in southwest Ohio asking what could be stripping bark from the branches of a large thornless honeylocust on their property. Their pictures showed that long slivers of bark were being removed from branches that were clearly much too high to be within reach of other possible bark strippers such as deer.
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Joe Boggs
A Single Leaf Diagnostic Case Study boggs.47 Sat, 07/01/2017 - 12:47
I would never recommend bringing a single tree leaf to an Extension office or garden center and asking the question, “what’s wrong with this tree?” However, sometimes a single leaf can speak volumes. Just accompany me or Jim Chatfield on one of our diagnostic walk-abouts (stand-abouts?) and we’ll prove it to you!
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Joe Boggs
Observations: Socrates, Poison Hemlock, Fennel Aphids, and Multicolored Asian Lady Beetles boggs.47 Thu, 06/29/2017 - 19:57
Poison hemlock (Conium maculatum, family Apiaceae) is one of the deadliest plants in North America. This non-native invasive weed contains highly toxic piperidine alkaloid compounds, including coniine and gamma-coniceine, which cause respiratory failure and death when ingested by mammals. So, how can fennel aphids survive sucking juices from the plant that killed Socrates and how can lady beetles survive eating the aphids?
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Joe Boggs
Sycamore Anthracnose Symptoms Fade chatfield.1 Thu, 06/29/2017 - 16:59

  This morning I got a message from Frank Leon, horticulturist with Barnes Nursery, complete with the above image showing the thinning of sycamore (American planetree; Platanus occidentalis), a common sight seen in northwest Ohio this Spring. The problem is sycamore anthracnose, caused by the fungus Apiognomonia veneta.

 

 

  This particular anthracnose fungus occurs on planetrees, including our native sycamore, but less so on Platanus orientalis and the hybrid between these two planetrees, Londone planetree (PlatanusX acerifolia...

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Jim Chatfield
Slug Sawfly on American Bladdernut boggs.47 Thu, 06/29/2017 - 13:48
In 2015, I reported that I had found sawfly larvae skeletonizing American bladdernut (Staphylea trifolia) leaves in southwest Ohio (see BYGL Bug Bytes, September 3, 2015, “Scarlet Oak Sawfly on Bladdernut?”). The title of that report was based on the appearance of the larvae: they were the spitting image of Scarlet Oak Sawfly (Caliroa quercuscoccineae) which is sometimes called the scarlet oak slug sawfly or just oak slug sawfly.
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Joe Boggs
Elongate Hemlock Scale Alert boggs.47 Thu, 06/29/2017 - 11:47
I revisited a Cilician fir (Abies cilicica) earlier this week in southwest Ohio that I found to be heavily infested with Elongate Hemlock Scale (EHS) (Fiorinia externa) in 2010. I’ve been monitoring this tree since that time and have watched the scale population rise and fall then rise again; the tree has never been treated.
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Joe Boggs
Why Trees Matter Forum; October 18 chatfield.1 Thu, 06/29/2017 - 09:56

Trees matter in many ways; just ask the Ents. Their beauty and grace is wondrous, they are proven healers for hospital patients, their social importance as historical references is well-known, from Johnny Appleseed to the Signal Tree in Summit County, and their environmental services, well…

 

  Check out treebenefits.com and itreetools.org for itemization of the economic benefits of the environmental services of trees: Storm water remediation, energy savings, air quality improvement, carbon effects, property values.

 

  With that in mind, in past years we...

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Jim Chatfield
The Return of an “Old Southern Friend” boggs.47 Wed, 06/28/2017 - 14:57
Julie Crook and I spent a lovely afternoon yesterday “cruising” the Cincinnati Botanical Garden and zoo with Steve Foltz (Director of Horticulture) looking at their impressive plant displays and working with Steve on with some diagnostics. During our walk-about, Steve pointed out an “old friend” scurrying beneath a goldenrain tree (Koelreuteria paniculata; Soapberry Family, Sapindaceae): a Goldenrain Tree Bug (Jadera haematoloma).
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Joe Boggs
Yellow Polka Dotted... Tomatoes?? draper.15 Tue, 06/27/2017 - 20:16

I was called out to visit a high tunnel vegetable grower, who was concerned about what he was seeing on tomato leaves, which he hadn’t seen before on the plants.  He told me that spots had suddenly began to appear on his tomato plants, and that he really didn’t want to lose the plants or the huge crop of tomatoes that the plants had set.

 

...
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Erik Draper
Basswood Leaf Miner Damage Can Be Alarming stone.91 Tue, 06/27/2017 - 10:00

What begins as minor feeding injury on the leaves of basswood (Tilia spp.), can quickly become an attention grabber, especially if you are unfamiliar with the insect and the injury caused. The leaves appear to be torched and stand out among other trees in the area. The damage is obvious even as you are traveling on highways - at the recommended speeds of course

...

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Amy Stone
Joe Boggs
Curtis E. Young
Shrub of the Week: Smokebush chatfield.1 Mon, 06/26/2017 - 08:13
Smokebush or smoketree (Cotinus) is puffing away right now, providing the almost ethereal inflorescences that give it its name  and alternates such as cloud bush, mist tree, wig tree, and Jupiter’s beard.  
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Jim Chatfield
Backyard Flashers boggs.47 Thu, 06/22/2017 - 09:11
I saw my first lighting beetles (Family Lampyridae) flashing in my backyard in southwest Ohio a little over a week ago. There were just a few; nothing to get too excited about. However, numbers have risen over the past few days to provide an impressive nighttime flashing display and I've gotten a few reports that the same is occurring in the central part of the state.
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Joe Boggs
Japanese Beetles and Masked Chafers on the Wing boggs.47 Wed, 06/21/2017 - 17:31
Japanese Beetles (Popillia japonica) are on the wing in southern and central Ohio with some localized heavy populations. Adding to the potential grub-party, I've been capturing a few Southern Masked Chafers (Cyclocephala lurida) around my porch lights at night in the southwest part of the state. Northern Masked Chafers (C. borealis) appear to be lagging behind.
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Joe Boggs
Bladdergalls boggs.47 Wed, 06/21/2017 - 14:55
I came across an old friend in a southwest Ohio county park over the weekend: the wart like, irregularly shaped galls, known as "bladdergalls," adorning the upper leaf surfaces of a red maple. The galls are produced under the gene-manipulating direction of the Maple Bladdergall Mite, Vasates quadripedes (family Eriophyidae). The mite also produces bladdergalls on silver maple.
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Joe Boggs
Look Closely for Lace Bugs boggs.47 Tue, 06/20/2017 - 12:52
The characteristic leaf damage produced by Lace Bugs (order Hemiptera; family Tingidae) is becoming evident in southwest Ohio. Lace bugs are tiny insects with the adults measuring no more than 3/16" long. They are so-named because of the lace-like pattern of veins and membranes in their wings. The nymphs are even tinier and appear to be covered in small spikes.
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Joe Boggs
My Favorite Things - Plants - How About This One! bennett.27 Tue, 06/20/2017 - 07:30

I love plants and proudly claim the titles of plant nerd, tree-hugger, plant geek and any others like this.  Plants of all kind - perennials, annuals, trees, shrubs, vegetables, native plants, etc. intrigue and delight.  How can you not like them!  One of my garden plants that looks particularly good right now is Calamagrostis  x acutiflora 'Karl Foerster' or Karl Foerster feather reed grass.  This grass is stellar and it's no wonder it's used quite a bit in both commercial landscapes and home gardens.  'Karl Foerster' was named the Perennial Plant of the Year by the...

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Pam Bennett
Rosaceous Rusts Rampage chatfield.1 Mon, 06/19/2017 - 14:00

Rust on serviceberry? Yes. Has the whole world gone mad? No. It just reveals itself to each of us in manageable gulps.  We talk frequently of three “cedar rusts” on BYGL: cedar apple rust, cedar hawthorn rust, cedar quince rust, all caused by separate species in the fungal genus Gymnosporangium (bygl.osu.edu/node/781).  In fact, it is not as simple as this – there are over 40 species of the Gymnosporangium fungus. 

 

  Not only that, but there are over 480 species in 11 genera of the rose family (Rosaceae) that are affected by Gymnosporangium ...

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Jim Chatfield
Magnolia Scale is Pumping-Out Honeydew boggs.47 Fri, 06/16/2017 - 17:02
I visited a landscape in southwest Ohio yesterday with a lily magnolia that was heavily infested with Magnolia Scale (Neolecanium cornuparvum). This is one of the largest "soft scales" in Ohio with mature females measuring as much as 1/2" in diameter. This native scale has a strong affinity for non-native magnolias and associated hybrids.
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Joe Boggs
Marginal Leaf Fold Galls on Oaks and Black Locust boggs.47 Wed, 06/14/2017 - 17:59
So-called marginal leaf fold galls are appearing on black locust and oaks belonging to the "red oak group" in southwest Ohio. The galls appear as rolled or folded leaf margins. They are produced by two different gall midges (family Cecidomyiidae).
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Joe Boggs
1st Generation Scarlet Oak Sawfly Larvae boggs.47 Wed, 06/14/2017 - 16:25
First generation scarlet oak sawfly (Caliroa quercuscoccineae) larvae are munching oak leaves in southwest Ohio. The larvae are currently in the 1st and 2nd instar stages and a little less than 1/8" long. Despite this sawfly's common name, larvae may be found feeding on a wide range of oaks including pin, black, red, and white oaks as well as its namesake oak.
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Joe Boggs
Squiggly Lines on Magnolia Leaves boggs.47 Wed, 06/14/2017 - 16:18
Participants at this week’s S.W. Ohio BYGLive! Diagnostic Walk-About held at the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden observed the highly visible handiwork of the Magnolia Serpentine Leafmining Caterpillar (Phyllocnistis magnoliella). The moth belongs to the leafmining family Gracillariidae.
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Joe Boggs
Maple Anthracnose chatfield.1 Sat, 06/10/2017 - 23:55

Jeff Stachler, OSU Extensioneer in Auglaize County sent the following message this past Tuesday on June 6:

  “A maple tree in the front of a home yard has leaves with the symptoms you see in the photos.  Veins and leaf tips are black with yellow and brown colors below the black.  Is there anything that can be done or should be done?” He also sent the tell-tale photo above, showing “water-soaked” darkish lesions along leaf veins.

 

Right on time. Last June 5, I took a picture of a neighbor’s red maple in Doyletown in northeast Ohio of the same problem: maple...

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Jim Chatfield
Dripping Dogwoods boggs.47 Sat, 06/10/2017 - 12:41
I recently came across dogwoods growing along a trail in southwest Ohio that were festooned with the frothy, spittle-like masses produced by the Dogwood Spittlebug (Clastoptera proteus); a reminder that there are at least 23 different species of spittlebugs (family Aphrophoridae) in North America.
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Joe Boggs
Rusty Hawthorns boggs.47 Sat, 06/10/2017 - 11:28
It’s easy to spot wild hawthorns growing along Ohio trails at this time of the year if they sport gaudy orange-spotted leaves. The spots are the telltale leaf symptoms of Cedar-Hawthorn Rust and the leaf infections can cause hawthorns to stand out among other understory trees and shrubs.
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Joe Boggs
Holey Bleached-Out Canada Thistle boggs.47 Fri, 06/09/2017 - 16:39
Canada thistle in southwest Ohio is starting to show symptoms of two “problems.” Bacterial infections are causing plants to look like they were dipped in bleach and the feeding damage by the Thistle Tortoise Beetle is beginning to produce see-through leaves.
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Joe Boggs
All Bugs Aren’t Bad Bugs boggs.47 Fri, 06/09/2017 - 15:43
Insects belonging to the Hemipteran family Reduviidae are collectively known as "Assassin Bugs." The family includes over 160 species in North America and all are meat eaters. The common name for the family clearly describes how these stealthy hunters make a living.
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Joe Boggs
Where Do Four-Lined Plant Bugs Come From? boggs.47 Fri, 06/09/2017 - 14:24
I’ve come to expect seeing some damage each spring from our native Four-Lined Plant Bug (Poecilocapsus lineatus, family Hemiptera). However, their wreckage appears to be particularly heavy this season in some parts of Ohio. The question “where did they come from” is common when hordes of hungry insect pests descend seemingly out of nowhere onto plants to cause extensive damage.
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Joe Boggs
Terrific Tree Lilacs Trim Tree Lawns dehaas.2 Wed, 06/07/2017 - 07:44
Japanese Tree Lilacs are in full bloom in northeast Ohio. They really grab your attention as you drive by with their showy white flowers that proliferate all over the head of the tree. They make you look twice and admire their beauty and form.
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Thomas deHaas
Tangled Up In Blues chatfield.1 Tue, 06/06/2017 - 16:21

Sometimes you just have to stop what you are doing and appreciate plant life. Kenny Cochran of Secrest Arboretum fame always loved plants in combination, especially after he came back from a trip to Poland with an appreciation of clematis twining up trees, wild-like.  Today Paul Snyder of Secrest sent me a picture of blue spruce needles piercing leaves of Tim Brotzman’s great redbud:  Cercis canadensis Lavender Twist® ‘Covey’ and the two plants entwined. How cool is this? 

 

...
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Jim Chatfield
Don't Touch This Weed! boggs.47 Mon, 06/05/2017 - 14:14
Wild parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) plants are rising towards their full height and blooms are beginning to appear in southern Ohio. Landscape managers and gardeners should exercise extreme caution around this non-native invasive plant. Severe blistering can occur if chemicals (furanocoumarins (= furocoumarins)) in the plant juices come in contact with skin and the skin is then exposed to sunlight; specifically ultraviolet light. The effect is called phytophotodermatitis.
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Joe Boggs
Kousa Dogwood: Tree of the Week chatfield.1 Mon, 06/05/2017 - 13:50

Before posting this bygl-alert, I had planned on reviewing the many cultivars of Chinese or Kousa dogwood that have entered the market in recent years, including Cornus kousa crosses with Cornus florida (our native flowering dogwood).  I will do this soon, but cannot wait. This is such a year for the kousa dogwood in my side yard that I must share pictures of it from this season right now.

 

...
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Jim Chatfield
Roadside Rest: Living in the Moment chatfield.1 Mon, 06/05/2017 - 11:31

One of the things I ask my Sustainable Landscape Maintenance students at the end of the semester is to expound upon 10 Things They Learned in class. Most of these are the core of the course: including plant selection and knowledge, plant pest, plant maintenance, invasive species examples. Pete Grantham of Akron though, added:

 

  I learn from you so much about living in the moment, talked to me about your hitchhiking [the old days] and how you think it’s fun to run out of gas. These moments that others would consider worrisome are...

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Jim Chatfield
American Elm Pests and Host Preference Studies boggs.47 Fri, 06/02/2017 - 15:07
I came across a 'Princeton' American elm (Ulmus americana) planted in a county park in southwest Ohio sporting three pests: Woolly Elm Aphid, (Eriosoma americanum); Elm Cockscomb Gall Aphid (Colopha ulmicola); and European Elm Flea Weevil (EEFW) (Orchestes alni). EEFW is a non-native, but the woolly and cockscomb gall aphids are native insects that appear in pest records dating back to when American elms were "America's Street Tree."
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Joe Boggs
Calico Scale Crawl boggs.47 Wed, 05/31/2017 - 14:13
Calico scale (Eulecanium cerasorum) eggs located beneath helmet-shaped females are hatching in southwest Ohio and the 1st instar nymphs (crawlers) are on the move. All nymphal stages are mobile, so all nymphs can be called "crawlers." The tiny, tannish-brown, oblong-shaped 1st instar crawlers are around 1/16" in length. They migrate to the undersides of leaves and position themselves along leaf veins where they insert their piercing-sucking mouthparts into phloem vessels to extract amino acids dissolved in the sugary plant sap.
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Joe Boggs
Gypsy Moth Traps Pop-Up stone.91 Tue, 05/30/2017 - 05:27
The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) is currently deploying traps to continue its monitoring efforts for gypsy moth across Ohio in cooperation with the US Forest Service. The green traps are being placed throughout Ohio at different densities, depending on location and the known gypsy moth activity. 
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Amy Stone
Springtime Fall Webworms boggs.47 Sun, 05/28/2017 - 13:53
Fall Webworms (Hyphantria cunea) have at least two generations in Ohio and overwintered eggs that produce the first generation are now hatching in the southwest part of the state. I took these images yesterday of a first generation nest on dogwood with 1st instar "black-headed" caterpillars constructing their characteristic silk nest and feeding upon the leaves enveloped within.
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Joe Boggs
Bagworm Eggs are Hatching boggs.47 Sat, 05/27/2017 - 12:00
Overwintered Common Bagworm (Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis) eggs are hatching in southwest Ohio. The 1st instar caterpillars are very small with their bags measuring around 1/8" in length. They're constructed with pieces of tan to reddish-brown, sawdust-like frass (excrement) stuck to the outside of silk. The tiny 1st instar bags look like little dunce caps.
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Joe Boggs
An Ode to Catalpas … Their Hornworms and a Tiny Wasp. boggs.47 Fri, 05/26/2017 - 13:00
Northern Catalpa (Catalpa speciosa, family Bignoniaceae) trees are in full-bloom in southern Ohio. Last year, I posted a BYGL Alert! extolling the virtues of catalpa trees; both northern and its southern cousin (C. bignonioides). Of course, I recognized a few minor shortcomings, but no tree is perfect. I noted that whether viewed as a beautiful, resilient native tree that will compliment any urban landscaping, or a coarse, messy, tree best confined to forested bottomlands, no one can ignore the beautiful bell-shaped blooms!
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Joe Boggs
Hail to Trails chatfield.1 Fri, 05/26/2017 - 12:11

This is a byglbook-alert, premature since I have only read the first chapter of the featured book, but I have started down its path of poesy and prose and hope you will too. The book is On Trails by Robert Moor (not “Moop”, for George Costanza fans).

 

  Robert Moor set out to hike the Appalachian Trail, Georgia to Maine, in 2009.  He speaks of this and then from there starts to muse deeply on the idea of trails, of paths, in his words “a meditation upon trails.”

 

...
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Jim Chatfield
Tree of the Week: Bladdernut chatfield.1 Fri, 05/26/2017 - 08:33

Now we turn to a second plant identification discussion from arborist Carrie Paulus: this one of a native small tree or large shrub.  The above photograph is credited to Carrie.  She saw this small tree with husband Bill at Lake Hope State Park on Mother’s Day.  It is bladdernut, Staphylea trifolia.  It is not rare in Ohio woodlands, but often it is not noticed.

 

  Bladdernut eludes the usual mnemonics for native woodland trees with opposite leaf arrangement such as MAD BUCK (maple, ash, dogwood, buckeye) or BAMEV DOGWOOD (same along with tree-sized euonymus and...

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Jim Chatfield
Fire Walk With Carrie chatfield.1 Thu, 05/25/2017 - 15:30

Is this a cross between the weird David Lynch genre and early Stephen King horror?  No. I was meeting with an arborist extraordinaire earlier today and when we exhausted our arboricultural topics she showed me a picture of what she purported to be, scarlet campion.

 

  I thought not – and for once was right – it was fire pink, Silene virginica.  She encountered this great woodland wildflower with her husband Bill at Lake Hope State Park in southeast Ohio on Mother’s Day. It is unusual to see such brilliant red color in the spring and summer woods.

 

...
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Jim Chatfield
Mulberry Whitefly "Pupae" Can Present an ID Challenge boggs.47 Thu, 05/25/2017 - 13:04
Participants in Monday's Southwest Ohio BYGLive! Diagnostic Walk-About held at Stanley Rowe Arboretum observed final instar nymphs, called "pupae," of the Mulberry Whitefly (Tetraleurodes mori) on the undersides of holly leaves. The round, shiny black pupae are ringed in a white fringe and are commonly mistaken for a scale insect. Indeed, whiteflies are not "flies" (order Diptera); they belong to the same order (Hemiptera) as scale insects and share certain traits with both armored and soft scale insects.
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Joe Boggs
Suspicious Spring Snow Sticks to Sidewalk dehaas.2 Tue, 05/23/2017 - 09:14
Populus grandidentata, commonly called large-tooth aspen, big-tooth aspen, American aspen, or white poplar, is a deciduous tree native to eastern North America. In northeast Ohio, it is in full bloom and the floss is falling off the fruiting structure and sticking to the sidewalks or turf. 
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Thomas deHaas
Enkianthus: Shrub of the Week chatfield.1 Tue, 05/23/2017 - 07:44

Several years back I bought this shade-loving shrub at one of the Secrest Arboretum sales.  This is the first year it has flowered.  I can’t find the tag naming the plant.  Can you ID it for me? - Thanks, Skip

 

  This was the e-mail impetus for this bygl-alert, coming from Dr. Skip Nault, Professor Emeritus, entomologist, and former Director of the Ohio State University’s Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) in Wooster. The pictures in this alert are from Skip. 

 

  The answer to Skip’s question is that it is a...

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Jim Chatfield
Hawthorn Leafminers Have Completed Their Development in S.W. Ohio boggs.47 Fri, 05/19/2017 - 17:35
On April 11, I reported that the adults of three leafmining sawflies were mating and laying eggs on their host trees in southwest Ohio (see BYGL Alert! Sawfly Leafminers Fly). Today, I noticed some heavy leafmining damage by one of the sawflies, the Hawthorn Leafminer (Profenusa canadensis), on its namesake host in a hospital parking lot in the southwest part of the state.
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Joe Boggs
Poison Hemlock is Flowering and Towering Over Fields and Landscapes in Southern Ohio. boggs.47 Fri, 05/19/2017 - 13:35
Poison hemlock (Conium maculatum) is one of the most lethal plants found in North America. This biennial weed is now producing flowers in southwest Ohio. So, the clock is ticking on preventing seed production by this non-native invasive plant.
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Joe Boggs
UPDATE: Early-Emerging Periodical Cicadas boggs.47 Fri, 05/19/2017 - 11:57
In my May 1, 2017, BYGL Alert! posting (Please Report Early-Bird Periodical Cicadas), I noted that Gene Kritsky (Mount St. Joseph University, Cincinnati) was predicting that we will see an "early emergence" of some members of Brood X of the 17-year periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) this spring even though this brood is not expected to emerge full force until 2021. In fact, as you can see by the photos I took in Springdale (Hamilton County), OH, the emergence is now well underway.
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Joe Boggs
Return of the Buckeye Leafmining Fly boggs.47 Wed, 05/17/2017 - 12:06
We have written a number of BYGL reports over the past several years on the springtime occurrence of leafmining damage on wild Ohio buckeyes caused by an unidentified leafmining fly in Ohio. During this week's BYGL online diagnostic inservice yesterday, Curtis Young (OSU Extension, Van Wert County) reported that he is seeing a return of the damage in northwest Ohio. Likewise, I have seen the damage in the southwest part of the state.
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Joe Boggs
A Case Study: Peach Leaf Curl on Ornamental Peach Trees boggs.47 Wed, 05/17/2017 - 10:38
Peach Leaf Curl is a springtime disease caused by the fungus Taphrina deformans. The fungus can infect peach (Prunus persica) as well as a few other members of the Prunus genus. The disease can be devastating in fruit orchards, but it can also appear on ornamental (flowering) peach trees in landscapes and nurseries; the "ornamental" designation does not impart resistance.
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Joe Boggs
Blue Lupine in Bloom stone.91 Tue, 05/16/2017 - 21:52

Northwest Ohio is celebrating Blue Week, May 16 - 23, 2017. A symbol of the Oak Openings Region, the wild blue lupine is a native plant that can be found not only growing, but thriving in sandy soils including at the sand dunes in Oak Openings Metropark and Kitty Todd Nature Preserve - both in Lucas County. This brilliant blue flowering plant had been lost in this natural landscape in the 1980s as a result of mowing the prairie-type habitat, the use of broad spectrum weed control, and fire suppression. However, it has recently made a come-back in natural areas and gardeners are planting it...

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Amy Stone
Erineum Patches on Tree Leaves boggs.47 Mon, 05/15/2017 - 12:40
Erineum Patches may be found on the upper or lower leaf surfaces of several species of deciduous trees in Ohio. They are considered a type of plant gall and their general appearance accounts for common names such as velvet galls or felt galls.
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Joe Boggs
Oak "Apples" and the Gall-Making Process boggs.47 Fri, 05/12/2017 - 13:11
Several types of "oak-apple" galls are now obvious on their namesake oak hosts in southern and central Ohio. These unusual plant growths range in size at maturity from 1/2 - 2" in diameter and are named for their resemblance to apples. The galls are constructed of various plant parts that have been hijacked by a gall wasp (Family Cynipidae) to surround a single wasp larva located within a seed-like structure positioned at the center of the gall.
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Joe Boggs
Recent Cold Temperatures Leaves a Variable Path of Damage to Plants in Ohio bennett.27 Fri, 05/12/2017 - 08:43

Depending on your geographical location in Ohio, the location of the plant, the actual low temperature, the plant species, as well as the growth stage on the species, the results of frost and freeze damage was variable across the state this past week.  Frost and freeze damage is so interesting because of so many variables.  A plant in a certain stage of growth may be more susceptible to frost or freeze damage than at other times.  The location of the plant in the garden may dictate the extent of the damage.  For instance, there might be two of the exact same plants in the same garden with...

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Pam Bennett
Garden Centers are Stuffed to the Gills! bennett.27 Thu, 05/11/2017 - 15:26

On recent visits to area gardens centers I noticed that they are filled with inventory and bursting at the seams!  Since we haven't had the best weather for the first part of May, garden center owners are looking for an incredible Mother's Day weekend - the busiest day of the year for them.  The weather so far looks to be promising not only for this weekend but also for next week.  Plants are looking good right now but they need to be moved out the door and into gardens in order to make way for the next crop that is pushing right behind!

 

A reminder to gardeners that once...

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Pam Bennett
Beautiful Blooming Buckeyes dehaas.2 Thu, 05/11/2017 - 15:20
The Ohio Buckeye, Aesculus glabra is native to Ohio and grows in the wild as an under story plant, but can tolerate sun. It prefers deep, rich and moist soil. It produces greenish-yellow flowers
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Thomas deHaas
Extrafloral Nectaries and ETC boggs.47 Thu, 05/11/2017 - 14:55
Last week, I wrote an Alert describing the "ETC Two-Step Control Method;" a very direct approach to eliminating Eastern Tent Caterpillars (ETC) (Malacosoma americanum). But what about more subtle "behind the scenes" ETC population regulators and where do extrafloral nectaries fit in?
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Joe Boggs
Act Now to Attract Colorful Visitors to your Yard rose.155 Wed, 05/10/2017 - 16:34
Each year in late April and early May many colorful migrating birds move through Ohio, often visiting suburban yards.   Some may only stay a few days before pushing on, others linger longer, and if you are lucky, a few may set up shop!   My favorite visitor is the Baltimore oriole, a bright orange and black bird.   Oranges, grape jelly, and nectar are known to attract this species.  
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Mimi Rose
Lovely Lilacs Lure Lads and Lassies to the Landscape dehaas.2 Wed, 05/10/2017 - 15:52
Lilacs, the fragrance, the beauty, the grace, the colors. Lilacs can come in all shapes, sizes ans colors. From pale purple to deep purple and white; whether a small, low shrub, a mature shrub to a upright, standard tree form, there is one to fit most landscapes. But even when they can't be seen, the fragrance attracts not only pollinators but people as well.
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Thomas deHaas
Doggone Gorgeous Dogwoods! draper.15 Wed, 05/10/2017 - 13:52

Here in Northeast Ohio, it has been an incredible year for observing bloom of ornamental flowering trees.  I propose that both the marvelous color and length of bloom is due to the bursts of very warm temperatures (70’s), followed by days of cooler temperatures (50’s), with a day or two of rain mixed in to keep things fresh!  The warm temperatures caused the buds to push fast into full bloom; however, then the cool temps and the rains move in preserving not only the colors, but also prolonging the length of bloom appeal and persistence on the plants.

...
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Erik Draper
Sassafras: Tree of the Week chatfield.1 Wed, 05/10/2017 - 08:26

  Sassafras was the bygl-alert Tree of the Week last July 29, but a reprise is in order. First of all, the emerging leaves and flowers have blown me away anew this Spring. Secondly, such a great horticulturist as Deb Knapke e-mailed me that “This is the first time I have seen the flowers of sassafras; loved it!” in response to the use of a sassafras flower picture in one of my Springtime bygl-alerts this year. 

...
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Jim Chatfield
Wall of Wisteria draper.15 Mon, 05/08/2017 - 15:38
As I was driving along the other day, it was raining and I was watching the road and the plants around me of course, when suddenly, out of the corner of my eye, I saw a flash of purple.  Intrigued, I just had to investigate and find out what the heck was going on with the purple flash!
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Erik Draper
Spruce Problem On Commercial Property chatfield.1 Mon, 05/08/2017 - 14:20

  Recently OSU Extensioneers Tim Malinich and Jim Chatfield met with horticulturists at a property in northern Ohio to look at a number of declining spruce trees. Most of the spruces on the property appeared healthy but a number had needle browning and and branch dieback, ranging from minor to severe.

  Some of the needle discoloration ascended the tree in somewhat of a spiral pattern, sometimes it was more complete, with some trees if not dead or dying, at the least becoming aesthetic liabilities. There was no evidence on the spruces at this property of any significant infectious...

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Jim Chatfield
Strobili Are Striking draper.15 Sat, 05/06/2017 - 21:08
In Northeast Ohio, the strobili, especially the female ones on the Picea abies or Norway Spruce, are spectacular.  These strobili or cones are located out on the very tips of main branches and because they are small right now, they’re sticking straight up.  The color of these immature female strobili ranges from a soft rose-pink to a deep, translucent burgundy. 
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Erik Draper
Annual Sugar Maple Leaf-Drop boggs.47 Sat, 05/06/2017 - 10:45
I noticed a large number of green leaves littering the ground beneath a shade-tree sized sugar maple today in southwest Ohio; not a surprise given the recent high winds and heavy rains. However, a closer look revealed the shed leaves all had very short petioles. The other part of the broken petioles remained attached to the tree and looked like toothpicks. This is the "calling card" of the Maple Petiole Borer (Caulocampus acericaulis).
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Joe Boggs
Meadow Spittlebugs boggs.47 Fri, 05/05/2017 - 17:46
I came across an impressive stand of Musk Thistle (Carduus nutans) earlier this week that was heavily infested with Meadow Spittlebug (Philaenus spumarius). Flower stalks of this biennial weed are currently bolting from the rosette stage. Virtually every thistle stem appeared to be festooned with the tell-tale frothy, spittle-like masses characteristic of this and other spittlebugs. The frothy masses are produced by spittlebug nymphs (family Aphrophoridae); adults of these insects are called "froghoppers."
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Joe Boggs
ETC Two-Step Control Method (Violence: Reader Discretion is Advised) boggs.47 Fri, 05/05/2017 - 15:35
Eastern tent caterpillar (ETC) (Malacosoma americanum) silk nests are now large enough and the accompanying defoliation evident enough to be very noticeable in Ohio. The nests are located in branch forks and they reveal that population densities and caterpillar developmental rates vary widely across the state. I've driven long stretches recently without seeing a single nest on trees flanking the highway only to round a curve or top a hill to arrive in an ETC wonderland.
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Joe Boggs
Peaches Are From China chatfield.1 Fri, 05/05/2017 - 08:39

  The Latin binomial for peaches is Prunus persica, which is a bit misleading. The genus name is fine – Prunus, a genus in the rose family (Rosaceae) that includes peaches and nectarines, plums, cherries, almonds, and apricots. This reference to Persia (present day Iraq) is a misnomer, since peaches originate from China, which today by far out produces all other countries in edible peach production.  Peaches eventually made it to Persia, then to Europe, then from Spanish explorers to the New World, where they were planted into orchards in Georgia, the Peach State by the...

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Jim Chatfield
ODA Gypsy Moth Treatments Continue Next Week stone.91 Thu, 05/04/2017 - 06:56

Spring is a busy time of the year when it comes to gypsy moth management.  Below is a news release distributed by the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA).  This release, videos, treatment maps and other communications can be found directly on the ODA website at:  http://www.agri.ohio.gov/divs/plant/gypsy/gypsy-index.aspx

 

The ODA will soon begin aerial treatments designed to control the gypsy moth population in Ohio. Treatments on 1,135 acres in Hancock, Hardin, Lucas, Marion and Union counties will...

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Amy Stone
Scouting For Viburnum Leaf Beetle stone.91 Thu, 05/04/2017 - 05:50

The viburnum leaf beetle (VLB) (Pyrrhalta viburni) is a non-native invasive species that is making Ohio its home - well at least some of the buckeye state.  While the insect has been detected and is known to be in the northern portion of the state, we are encouraging all Ohioans to monitor for the pest and become aware of signs and symptoms if you aren't familiar with exotic invader. 

 

Last week, Mary Visco, horticulturist with the Toledo Botanical Garden (TBG) in Toledo, Ohio was scouting the viburnums in the Garden and noticed first instar larvae had hatched and...

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Amy Stone
Curtis E. Young
Gnarled Oak Leaf Midge Galls boggs.47 Wed, 05/03/2017 - 18:38
I've recently gotten e-mail messages with images of a gnarly looking leaf gall appearing on pin oaks in Cincinnati, OH, and Lexington, KY. The unsightly, lumpy growths are produced by a gnat-like gall-midge (Macrodiplosis niveipila, family Cecidomyiidae) and have the descriptive common name of Gnarled Oak Leaf Midge Galls.
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Joe Boggs
A Nostoc Tour de Force boggs.47 Wed, 05/03/2017 - 17:20
Our warm, wet spring has provided ideal conditions for the rise of a strange looking organism with a scientific name that sounds like a '70s California happening: Nostoc commune. This bizarre organism may look as if an agglomeration of rubbery yellowish-green to bluish-black material is "bubbling-up" in the open spaces in Ohio landscapes as well as gravel driveways.
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Joe Boggs
Flower Celebration chatfield.1 Tue, 05/02/2017 - 17:11

  A lovely tradition of celebrating diversity (Oslava Květin) was started by Norbert Čapek, a Czech Unitarian, in 1923, with flowers as symbols of the universality of nature and ecumenical love. Start your own flower celebration in your home, for every business meeting, with your customers, sharing the beauty of flowers – especially this time of year: this “lusty month of May” (from Camelot). Everyone bring a flower! Here are a few floral fineries from my home and neighbors.

  The cover image for this bygl-...

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Jim Chatfield
Hydrangea Leaftier Oddball Damage boggs.47 Tue, 05/02/2017 - 16:45
I first came across the odd looking handiwork of Hydrangea Leaftier Moth (Family Tortricidae; Olethreutes ferriferana) caterpillars several years ago on its native namesake host in Clifton Gorge in Greene County, OH. Since that time, I've commonly found this leaftier on wild and cultivated hydrangeas at other locations.
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Joe Boggs
Holey Oak Leaves! boggs.47 Tue, 05/02/2017 - 16:32
Look closely at developing oak leaves for Spiny Oak Sawfly (Periclista albicollis) larvae. The small, light-green, semi-transparent larvae have shiny black head capsules and are covered with rows of forked (bifurcated) spines. Their small size coupled with their coloration allows these larvae to easily blend with their leaf-food background.
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Joe Boggs
Please Report Early-Bird Periodical Cicadas boggs.47 Mon, 05/01/2017 - 10:12
Periodical Cicadas (Magicicada spp.) take either 17 or 13 years to complete their development and emerge from the soil en masse as different "broods" in the spring. The only periodical cicada brood that's forecast to emerge this year is Brood VI. However, there is a prediction that we will see an "early emergence" of some members of Brood X this spring even though adults of this brood are not expected to emerge full-force until 2021.
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Joe Boggs
Badaling, Badaling: The Great Wall of China chatfield.1 Sat, 04/29/2017 - 11:23

A trip to China often includes a visit to The Great Wall of China, to some part of the 5500 to 13,000 mile collection of fortifications (depending on whether various branches are included).   So, I set out for the Great Wall with my guide Nina during my trip to the Beijing Botanic Gardens for their Crabapple Conference. Nina gassed up a Hyundai and we headed 50 miles northwest and over a half mile in elevation to Badaling (八达岭), the most visited section of the Wall and the first opened to tourists in 1957. From Nixon to Obama, to Nina and me.  

 

...
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Jim Chatfield
Is it Time to Plant Tomatoes? Check the Soil Temperature! crook.46 Fri, 04/28/2017 - 11:55
This time of year everyone is anxious to get out and begin planting their vegetable garden. You may have spent the last few months browsing the seed catalogs and dreaming about fresh tomatoes from your garden. Also you may have recently noticed vegetable transplants at your local retailers however this does not necessarily mean it is time to start planting.
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Julie Crook
Glenwood Gardens: A "Volcano" Mulch-Free Zone boggs.47 Thu, 04/27/2017 - 19:12
Most of my images are of bad things in landscapes. I use these teaching images to illustrate plant threats; sometimes those threats are from people. So-called "volcano mulch" or "mulch mounds" is a good example. That's why I was so thrilled yesterday when I found example after example of absolutely perfect tree mulching at Glenwood Gardens!
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Joe Boggs
Slugged Rose Leaves boggs.47 Thu, 04/27/2017 - 16:36
Roseslug sawflies were once generally considered only nuisance pests of roses in Ohio. The Common Roseslug Sawfly was most often encountered followed occasionally by the Curled Roseslug. The common roseslug has only one generation and the curled roseslug two generations. These sawflies would come and go so quickly they seldom caused appreciable damage.
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Joe Boggs
Corrugated River Birch Leaves boggs.47 Thu, 04/27/2017 - 14:37
The unusual leaf distortion damage caused by the spiny witchhazel gall aphid (Hamamelistes spinosus) is now appearing on river birch in southwest Ohio. The aphid produces raised ribs or "corrugations" on the upper leaf surface that match deep furrows between the veins on the lower leaf surface where the aphids live.
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Joe Boggs
Springtime in Ohio chatfield.1 Thu, 04/27/2017 - 08:56

  Woke up, got out of bed, dragged a comb across my head…Well, no, that is truly Fake News. Yet, upon returning from China to Springtime busting out all over in Ohio, I was mesmerized by the buzzing bees and budding birches; the blending of sweet birch catkins and flowering dogwood bracts above. Welcome to the Show! And right here in the Wayne County ChatScape.

 

  Up first, with a nod to China, is a golden-leaved ‘Ogon’ cultivar of dawnredwood, Metasequoia glyptostroboides.

 

...
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Jim Chatfield
Crabapples in China chatfield.1 Wed, 04/26/2017 - 06:14

  One of the more pleasant e-mails I have received in recent memory was from my friend and colleague Dr. Ling Guo of the Beijing Botanic Gardens. It read: “Jim, would you please come to Beijing for Crabapple Conference in April 14-19 for one hour talk. All expenses paid.  Hmm, let’s see. Yes!  Fortunately, for my talkative nature it turned out to be a bit more than that one hour talk, not including the translations, but what a deal. 

...

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Jim Chatfield
Erik Draper
First Generation Pine Needle Scale Crawlers are Afoot. boggs.47 Tue, 04/25/2017 - 19:01
First generation Pine Needle Scale (Chionaspis pinifoliae) crawlers (1st instar nymphs) are now appearing on conifers in southwest Ohio. This is a type of "armored" scale so-named because of the hard, waxy cover (test) that protects the females. The egg-shaped pine needle scale tests are snow white with a small yellowish-tan spot at the small end.
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Joe Boggs
Boxwood Leafminer Major boggs.47 Tue, 04/25/2017 - 18:47
I first raised the alarm on boxwood leafminers (Monarthropalpus flavus) in a BYGL Alert posted in late March (see "Blistered Boxwoods and Hissing Hedges", March 30, 2017). That report focused on alerting landscape managers that high localized populations were producing heavy leafmining symptoms that could be mistaken for winter injury.
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Joe Boggs
Crabapples In Crablandia Are A Dazzling Display! draper.15 Sun, 04/23/2017 - 21:18

The crabapple plot, called Crablandia in Secrest Arboretum, is located in Wooster, Ohio and will be in full bloom and full splendor, in the next couple of days.  With the onset of multiple periods of unseasonably warm weather, the typical bloom emergence time is about 2 weeks ahead of schedule.  The incredible display of crabapple flowers has traditionally been one of the most popular times to stroll through the Arboretum and experience the amazing fragrance, accompanied by marvelous views of flower petals.

...
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Erik Draper
Knotty Honeylocusts: A Diagnostic Conundrum boggs.47 Sat, 04/22/2017 - 14:13
Last week, while photographing calico scale (Eulecanium cerasorum) on honeylocusts (Gleditsia triacanthos) in a commercial landscape (see BYGYL Alert, Calico Scale is Puffing-Up and Pumping Honeydew, April 19, 2017), I came across two trees with numerous knot-like growths on the stems.
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Joe Boggs
Rusty Junipers boggs.47 Wed, 04/19/2017 - 20:03
Junipers in southwest Ohio are being garnished with tangerine tentacles and orange goo; the calling cards of rust fungi. The three fungi producing the colorful displays belong to the genus Gymnosporangium and each must alternate between a member of the plant genus Juniperus and members of the rose family (Rosaceae) in order to complete their life cycle.
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Joe Boggs
Wilting Buckeyes boggs.47 Wed, 04/19/2017 - 18:17
Wilting buckeyes may sound like an Ann Arbor dream, but I'm not talking about our beloved Silver Bullets. I'm referring to the symptoms caused by the Buckeye Petiole Borer (Proteoteras aesculana) on its namesake host.
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Joe Boggs
Calico Scale is Puffing-Up and Pumping Honeydew boggs.47 Wed, 04/19/2017 - 16:43
Overwintered calico scale (Eulecanium cerasorum) females are now "puffing-up" and pumping out impressive quantities of clear, sugary honeydew in southwest Ohio. The appearance of the globular, helmet-shaped females coupled with complaints of trees oozing sticky goo makes this life-stage important for detecting new infestations. All other life-stages are much less obvious.
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Joe Boggs
Sneaky Common Chickweed is Going to Seed boggs.47 Tue, 04/18/2017 - 08:41
Common Chickweed (Stellaria media) is a European winter annual that is now found world-wide. Winter annuals are sneaky weeds. They produce seeds in the spring then plants fade away prior to the summer season; out of sight, out of mind. The seeds dodge spring applied preemergent herbicide bullets because they do not germinate until the fall. The resulting plants grow below our radar throughout the fall, winter, and early spring when we pay little attention to what's going on in our lawns and landscapes.
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Joe Boggs
Focus on Poison Hemlock Control boggs.47 Mon, 04/17/2017 - 15:39
Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum) is one of the deadliest plants in North America. This non-native invasive was imported as an ornamental in the late 1800s from Europe, West Asia, and North Africa. The plant contains highly toxic piperidine alkaloid compounds, including coniine and gamma-coniceine, which cause respiratory failure and death in mammals.
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Joe Boggs
Tigers are Prowling Ohio Woodlands boggs.47 Mon, 04/17/2017 - 12:40
My good friend Brad Bonham told me about a conversation she had with a landscaper over the weekend who declared they were seeing Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis) (EAB) beetles mating in a woodland in southwest Ohio. Of course, as she noted, it's way too early for EAB adults to be on the wing; full bloom of black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) is a good phenological indicator for EAB adult emergence.
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Joe Boggs
Cressleaf Groundsel: A Grown-up "Weed" boggs.47 Mon, 04/17/2017 - 12:08
I've watched Cressleaf Groundsel (Packera glabella; syn. Senecio glabellus) for years popping-up in landscapes and farm fields. However, I never truly appreciated the canary yellow display provided by this winter annual. Indeed, I've placed all of my past BYGL reports on this native plant under the header, "Weed of the Week."
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Joe Boggs
Not Too Early For Ticks: Dog Tick kulhanek.5 Fri, 04/14/2017 - 14:14

It's never too early for tick awareness.

Today, at the Extension Office, a tick sample was brought in for identification.  It was an adult male dog tick, Dermacentor variabilis.  Ticks are blood-feeding parasites.  Three species are medically important in Ohio as a vector of several diseases affecting humans and pets to varying degrees.  The American Dog Tick, along with the deer tick (or black-legged tick) and the lone star tick.  Tick populations have been an increasing problem in Ohio.

...

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Ashley Kulhanek
European Elm Flea Weevil boggs.47 Fri, 04/14/2017 - 12:29
Overwintered European Elm Flea Weevils (Orchestes alni) are attacking emerging elm leaves in southwest Ohio. A close examination will reveal weevils feeding and frolicking (mating) among the newly expanding leaves.
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Joe Boggs
Eastern Tent Caterpillar Update boggs.47 Fri, 04/14/2017 - 12:23
Eastern Tent Caterpillars (ETC) (Malacosoma americanum) caterpillars are accomplished and prolific tent-makers producing highly visible silk nests in the forks of branches. The nests are now large enough to be easily seen in Greater Cincinnati. However, at this point in the season, it appears that populations are highly localized and not widespread.
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Joe Boggs
NW Ohio Anticipating Egg Hatch of Gypsy Moth stone.91 Thu, 04/13/2017 - 15:41

Conversations among family and friends this week could include dying, hiding and finding "eggs." It is Easter you know. 

 

The eggs that we are talking about in this BYGL Alert are those of the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar).  After spending about nine months in the egg mass stage, warmer temperatures are triggering the hatch of the caterpillars in Ohio.  These tan almost felt-like in appearance masses that can be laid anywhere will soon be bursting with 1st instar caterpillars. 

While we are eagerly awaiting the first hatch in NW Ohio,...

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Amy Stone
Spring Lawn Seeding stone.91 Thu, 04/13/2017 - 15:08

 

This Turf-Tip was provided Joe Rimelspach and Todd Hicks with OSU – Plant Pathology and Turfgrass Program.

 

Of the four seasons, this is the “third best time” to seed a lawn. The best is autumn, then winter, followed by spring and the least desirable time is summer. The main challenge with the spring seeding is the large number of weeds (both grassy weeds and broadleaf weeds) that can come up with the grass seed. Seed as early as possible in the spring so new plant can develop a root system before summer heat and dry conditions...

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Amy Stone
Product or Active Ingredient - Could There Be Confusion? stone.91 Thu, 04/13/2017 - 14:57

 

Earlier this week, Pamela Sherratt, Turfgrass Specialist in the Department of Horticulture and Crop Science at The Ohio State University alerted Extension to the potential of some questions coming into the Extension offices about a product, Roundup for Lawns from clientele across the state.    

 

A walk through the aisles of the pest management area of a garden center this spring may cause some consumers to take a second look. While Roundup has been around for a long time, Roundup for Lawns is a new product that has recently hit the shelves. The same name and...

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Amy Stone
Sawfly Leafminers Fly boggs.47 Tue, 04/11/2017 - 15:59
I found Elm Leafminer Sawfly (Fenusa ulmi) adults flying around their namesake host yesterday in southwest Ohio. The emergence of this leafmining sawfly was predicted in my part of the state by accumulated GDD (219) and phenological indicators such as the full bloom of common chokecherry. This also means there is little doubt that Birch Leafminer Sawfly (F. pusilla) and Hawthorn Leafminer Sawfly (Profenusa canadensis) adults are on the wing.
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Joe Boggs
Juniper Scale Examined boggs.47 Tue, 04/11/2017 - 15:02
I came across an infestation of Juniper Scale (Carulaspis juniperi, Family Diaspididae) Sunday while doing some unconditional pruning (e.g. whacking back!) of junipers in the Boggscape. The discovery provided great samples to share, examine, and discuss with participants in the first 2017 Southwest Ohio BYGLive! Diagnostic Walk-About held yesterday at Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum.
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Joe Boggs
Ground-Nesting Bees on the Wing boggs.47 Tue, 04/11/2017 - 14:53
The starting point for yesterday's Southwest Ohio BYGLive! Diagnostic Walk-About held at Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum was inadvertently located in the middle of a very busy ground-nesting bee bailiwick. This sparked an impromptu discussion on the behavior and importance of these native pollinators.
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Joe Boggs
Form and Function chatfield.1 Tue, 04/04/2017 - 07:43

In architecture,  a term often used is form (ever) follows function.  This was coined and practiced by the 20th century U.S. architect Louis Sullivan and inspired, for example, Frank Lloyd Wright.

 

  A loose form of this emerged during a recent class trip for the Horticulture and Crop Science 3410 class (Sustainable Landscape Maintenance). We had just visited the wonderful “Building Ohio State: From Forest to the Renovation of Thompson Library” exhibit on the first floor of the magnificent OSU Thompson Library (exhibit until May 14) on the Main Campus in Columbus...

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Jim Chatfield
Burrowing Crayfish Activity on the Rise boggs.47 Mon, 04/03/2017 - 16:16
I was amazed yesterday at the prolific handiwork of Burrowing Crayfish in the Voice of America (VOA) MetroPark in Butler County located in southwest Ohio. Hundreds of their unusual looking mud structures were rising from the soil in turfgrass and naturalized areas.
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Joe Boggs
Purple Haze All in My Eyes boggs.47 Mon, 04/03/2017 - 10:15
If you've traveled Ohio's southern interstates lately, particularly on I-71 between Columbus and Cincinnati, you may have hummed a Hendrix tune or felt like riders of the purple sage as you drove past farm fields bathed in a deep purple hue.
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Joe Boggs
Julie Crook
Updated EAB Detection Map stone.91 Sun, 04/02/2017 - 22:04

Each month, the United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Animal Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) updates and distributes an Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) Detection Map. While EAB is "old news" to many in the buckeye state, it is interesting to continue to watch the progression of this invasive species in North America. In February 2003, EAB was confirmed for the first time in Ohio in Lucas County in NW Ohio, approximately seven months after the initial detection and identification in Michigan the summer before. Fast forward 14+ years later...

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Amy Stone
Blistered Boxwoods and Hissing Hedges boggs.47 Thu, 03/30/2017 - 12:07
Off-colored boxwood leaves may not be symptoms of winter injury. Boxwood leafminer damage is widespread, but the non-native culprit often flies below the radar.
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Joe Boggs
Coltsfoot, Not Dandelion kulhanek.5 Wed, 03/29/2017 - 13:02
While on a walk, "Mew Mew" found a mysterious flower in the yard. These are not dandelions. This is coltsfoot, Tussilago farfara.
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Ashley Kulhanek
The 2017 Southwest Ohio BYGLive! Diagnostic Walk-Abouts Green Industry Professional Training Series boggs.47 Wed, 03/29/2017 - 10:38
This is the 21st year for the OSU Extension, Diagnostic Walk-Abouts in Southwest Ohio! Opening day for the series is April 10 at Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum.
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Joe Boggs
Some Unscientific Weather-Related Observations boggs.47 Mon, 03/27/2017 - 17:28
Our winter temperature roller-coaster ride has yielded some surprising results in southwest Ohio. This unscientific report presents a few observations.
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Joe Boggs
List of Flowering Plants Attractive to Bees boggs.47 Fri, 03/24/2017 - 15:20
You can have a positive impact on the plight of our pollinators thanks to "Plants Bees Like Best: Bee-Friendly Trees and Shrubs."
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Joe Boggs
Firewood Beetles Flare-Up boggs.47 Thu, 03/23/2017 - 14:00
Longhorned beetles emerge from firewood to the surprise and consternation of homeowners.
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Joe Boggs
Outstanding Resource for Testing Ticks bennett.27 Fri, 03/17/2017 - 11:21

Nancy Taylor recently found a great resource regarding ticks called the Laboratory of Medical Zoology (LMZ).  LMZ is an academic research lab at the University of Massachusetts with a focus on infectious diseases or more specific "zoonosis".  Their website describes zoonosis as "diseases with transmission cycles that involve other animal species."  One of the great things about this resource is that they test ticks for diseases.  The standard test of deer ticks is $50.00 and includes testing for Lyme disease, Anaplasmosis and Babesiosis.  In addition you can search their database and find...

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Pam Bennett
Eastern Tent Cats on the Horizon boggs.47 Sat, 03/11/2017 - 13:07
Eastern Tent Caterpillar (ETC) moth eggs have started hatching in Georgetown, KY, which means that egg hatch should be on the horizon in Greater Cincinnati.
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Joe Boggs
Spring-Like Conditions and a Predicted Egg Hatch of Eastern Tent Caterpillars. boggs.47 Fri, 02/24/2017 - 11:20
The early flowering of trees and shrubs in Greater Cincinnati is highly unusual; perhaps unprecedented. Phenological and GDD indicators predict that overwintered eggs of eastern tent caterpillars may be hatching.
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Joe Boggs
Emerald Ash Borer University - Spring 2017 stone.91 Mon, 02/20/2017 - 20:51

Are you looking to get your emerald ash borer (EAB) updates?  Pesticides?  Parasitoids?  Why not learn more about EAB and other invasives from the comfortable of your own office or home?  Tomorrow, February 21 is the official kick-off to the "2017 spring semester." 

 

On Tuesday, February 21, 2017 at 11:00 am EST, Dr. Cliff Sadof with Purdue University will be providing an update on Chemical Control of EAB:  What Works, What Doesn't Work, and Why.  This session is the first of a series of presentations that include information on hemlock woolly...

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Amy Stone
Warm Winters and Insect Survival boggs.47 Sat, 02/18/2017 - 13:48
What effect will our balmy winter temperatures have on insect pests? Overwintering strategies of insects are varied and complicated meaning we can't paint with a broad brush when answering this question.
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Joe Boggs
Weird Willow Pinecone Galls and a Gall-Conversion! boggs.47 Sat, 02/11/2017 - 18:45
Winter walk reveals weird willow pinecone galls.
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Joe Boggs
Building Ohio State - A Must See Library Exhibit stone.91 Sat, 02/04/2017 - 15:09

 

 

If you are on the Ohio State University campus anytime now until May 14, 2017,  Building Ohio State it is a must see.  In fact, it is worth a trip to Columbus to specifically see this library exhibit. You won't be disappointed as the amount of planning and preparation by the team that pulled everything together is truly amazing! You will learn about how trees play such an important role - both while they are alive and after they are harvested. One of my favorite areas of the exhibit included a "did you know case" that included a wide variety of...

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Amy Stone
Kathy Smith
Never Too Early To Begin Tracking Growing Degree Days (GDD) stone.91 Tue, 01/31/2017 - 22:15

A recorded breaking warm-up in January is just a memory. While temperatures are feeling a bit more winter-like, it is not too earlier to begin following the Growing Degree Day Calendar online at  https://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/gdd/

 

A quick check earlier today showed that Toledo had accumulated 16 GDD units in 2017.  Do you know what is happening in your part of the state? Check it out today! 

 

Once at the website, all you will need is an Ohio zipcode! 

 

...
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Amy Stone
ODA Announces 2017 Gypsy Moth Treatment Project Open Houses stone.91 Sat, 01/07/2017 - 02:51

The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) has announced the 2017 Gypsy Moth Treatment Project Open Houses that will be held this winter prior to treatment applications that will be made later in the spring and summer. 

 

 

The gypsy moth is currently in the egg mass stage where it has been since late last summer.  This spring, caterpillars will hatch and the feeding frenzy will begin. 

...
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Amy Stone
2017 Tri-State Green Industry Conference Highlights crook.46 Fri, 01/06/2017 - 16:56
Register now! Thursday, February 2, 2017 Sharonville Convention Center 11355 Chester Rd Cincinnati, OH 45246
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Julie Crook
2017 Tri-State Green Industry Conference crook.46 Fri, 12/30/2016 - 13:29
Thursday, February 2, 2017 Sharonville Convention Center 11355 Chester Rd Cincinnati, OH  45246
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Julie Crook
Ohio Woodlands, Water and Wildlife Newsletter Available Online stone.91 Wed, 12/28/2016 - 10:01

Have you heard of the Ohio State University Woodland Stewards Program?  If you haven't, I will let you in on a little secret.  The Ohio Woodland Stewards Program is an excellent educational resource that includes publications, workshops, classes, tree scale sticks, and links to other resources for anyone who cares for or manages trees, has an interest in aquatics and enjoys wildlife!

 

Ohio Woodlands, Water and Wildlife, is a newsletter that is produced three times a year. It provides subcribers with updates on the latest issues related to woodland management,...

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Amy Stone
Commercial Applicator Pesticide Recertification Conferences Scheduled stone.91 Wed, 12/28/2016 - 09:42
The Ohio State University's Pesticide Safety Education Program will be offering four Commercial Pesticide Applicator Recertification Conferences across Ohio during the winter of 2017.
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Amy Stone
Revised Worker Protection Standard Workshops Offered in 2017 stone.91 Wed, 12/21/2016 - 12:13

 

Is your business compliant with revised worker protection standards?  The Federal Worker Protection Standards (WPS) protects agricultural workers and pesticide handlers by reducing their risk from pesticide exposure.  WPS was revised in 2015, and phased-in compliance begins January 2, 2017. 

 

These FREE workshop will provide employers and managers what they need to bring their WPS Program in compliance with the new requirements, including changes in training, restrictions during applications, personal protective equipment, decontamination...

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Amy Stone
Tree of the Week: Sweetgum chatfield.1 Tue, 12/13/2016 - 23:30

  You are all waiting for BYGLQuest 3 results, I know you are...Soon. For now, though" 

  There are variegated sweetgums. There are upright sweetgums. There are those who are driven to distraction by sweetgum fruits, cool though they are.  There are the multitudinous fall colors of sweetgum, There are the winged stems of many sweetgums. There are the truly wonderful monoecious flowers of sweetgum. There are sweetgums in the snow. There are sweetgums that range from Florida to states north of Ohio. Liquidambar styraciflua, you of the twice-named gum, we barely know ye!...

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Jim Chatfield
2016 Ohio State University Green Industry Short Course A Success stone.91 Tue, 12/13/2016 - 05:35
A shout out to all the attendees, presenters, moderators and monitors who participated in the 2016 OSU Green Industry Short Course.  The Short Course was held last week in collaboration with the Ohio Turfgrass Foundation's Conference and Tradeshow at the Greater Columbus Convention Center. 
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Amy Stone
Last Vestiges of Fall, Part Deux chatfield.1 Mon, 12/12/2016 - 22:11

  As each day goes by, the season for fall color continues to fade, but one last time (oh maybe another to come), here are a few features from last week, starting with the lead photo of the European larch at OSU’s Wooster Campus showing its final glories before winter quiescence.

 

  Next, check out the roses in German Village, still blooming during the OSU Nursery Short Course and Ohio Turfgrass Foundation Show last week. Now they are surely blasted. But those leaves with the black spot will fall to the base of the plant and lurk into next season, developing spores for...

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Jim Chatfield
Last Vestiges of Fall, Part 1 chatfield.1 Sun, 12/11/2016 - 22:48

  Last week was the Ohio Turfgrass Foundation Show and the OSU Green Industry Short Course and I took a few pastry-seeking walks down to German Village from the Columbus Convention Center. With this weekend’s cold and snow, let us remember some of the – last vestiges of fall, starting above with florist's geraniums, sure to no longer be with us.

 

  Barberry (Berberis) fall foliage is quite colorful, and while fact-checking a bit, I was surprised to learn that the Berberidaceae family also includes two of my favorite wildflowers, Podophyllum...

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Jim Chatfield
BYGLQuest 2016-3: The Name Game chatfield.1 Sat, 12/03/2016 - 17:23
And now…for BYGLQuest 2016-3...I hope you are adorned in your togas, using your fingers to eat olives and figs.  Or how about nocello poured over gelato?  At any rate, here is your weekend challenge – and timing is everything. The best answer to these four plant name and classification questions by 11:59 Sunday night, December 4, 2016 will receive a publication from my archives. 
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Jim Chatfield
Knowing About Trees... Will Definitely Please! draper.15 Fri, 12/02/2016 - 20:37

Have you always wanted to know more about trees and why they grow like they do, why they need the resources that they utilize and just what exactly do they need to grow and thrive… And have many other question like these?  Well the perfect learning opportunity has arrived with some outstanding speakers and researchers willing to share their current tree knowledge with you!

 

...
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Erik Draper
Shrub of the Week: Winterberry Holly chatfield.1 Fri, 12/02/2016 - 15:07
{Text and photos for this bygl-alert are provided by Paul Snyder, horticulturist for OSU’s Secrest Arboretum at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster, with a little help from Jim Chatfield}. Deck the halls with boughs of holly, winterberry (Ilex verticillata) that is. While this member of the genus Ilex is not what Thomas Oliphant had in mind when he transliterated the lyrics of this ancient welsh carol into English, it is what we think of at Secrest. Ilex verticillata is perhaps the most visually stunning member of the genus Ilex. Ilex, which comes from the...
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Jim Chatfield
BYGLQuest 2016-2 Revealed: Its The Blueberries chatfield.1 Thu, 12/01/2016 - 15:06

 

  You may recall that the challenge for BYGLQuest 2016-2 (http://bygl.osu.edu/node/649) was to identify all plants in the images accompanying the text. There were numerous fine responses, but the discriminator was the one and only person to identify the lead image (see above).  It is a blueberry (Vaccinium sp.) in my backyard.

 

...

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Jim Chatfield
ALB eNewsletter from USDA stone.91 Tue, 11/29/2016 - 13:57

Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) has been in the news recently, including a BYGL Alert written by Joe Boggs on November 18, 2016 - "New ALB Infestation Found in Clermont County, OH."  That BYGL Alert can be found by clicking on this link:  http://bygl.osu.edu/node/641

 

While there is an interest in regular ALB Updates in Ohio since eradication efforts are underway to eliminate this exotic invader in the buckeye state.  People may occasionally want a national update with reports from Massachusetts and New York...

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Amy Stone
Buckeye Nation. Buckeye World chatfield.1 Tue, 11/29/2016 - 10:26
  Buckeye Nation. Buckeye World. O pacem in terris, mir, shanti, salaam, hey wa.
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Jim Chatfield
BYGLQuests: Viburnum Victors and Leaf Lessons chatfield.1 Mon, 11/28/2016 - 21:27
  Without knowing it, bygl-alerts have started a new feature – a weekly plant quiz.  
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Jim Chatfield
Trees of the Week: Late Fall Beauty chatfield.1 Sun, 11/27/2016 - 22:36
  I have decided to take my cue from Joe Cochran this week and instead of a single tree (or shrub), select several that spoke to me in November. Starting with the scarlet-and-gray Japanese maple pictured above.
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Jim Chatfield
BYGL Mail - November 25, 2016: Ginkgoes and All Trees Remembered chatfield.1 Sat, 11/26/2016 - 00:54

  First things first: Remember that the Ohio Turfgrass Conference and the OSU Green Industry Short Course are coming soon (December 6-8), and are preceded by the OSU Trees on Tap program on December 5. Check it out:

  The program schedule is at:  http://www.otfshow.org/education/

  Register at:  http://www.otfshow.org/registration/

  And now to ginkgoes – and trees – for our Thanksgivings.  From Kent Honl, arborologist (a term from the great John Lloyd lexicon) of...

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Jim Chatfield
BYGL Mailbag - November 24, 2016: Nude VIburnums chatfield.1 Fri, 11/25/2016 - 01:38

  I was talking to the Ohio Hosta Society the other night about Vibunum nudum (go figure) and it reminds me now during this Thanksgiving holiday time that it is time to catch up with the BYGL Mailbag and comments from bygl-alert readers. Note: If you correspond, we will not use your name and direct quotes for these Mailbag items without your permission.

  So, Viburnum nudum…if you have read http://bygl.osu.edu/node/627 and http://bygl.osu.edu/node/635 you know...

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Jim Chatfield
Trees on Tap Program: December 5 chatfield.1 Wed, 11/23/2016 - 15:12
  Ohio is certainly the place for trees (more later), and you will certainly learn a great deal more about trees at OSU’s 2nd Annual Trees on Tap program on December 5 at the Ohio Convention Center, immediately preceding the 89th Ohio State University Green Industry Short Course and 50th Ohio Turfgrass Conference from December 6-8. 
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Jim Chatfield
Perennials for Shade stone.91 Wed, 11/23/2016 - 13:20

While some areas of the state have received their first snowfall of the season, others haven't had that joy - at least not yet.  This time of the year is a great time to expand your knowledge and learn the latest and the greatest; all in preparation for the 2017 season. 

 

If someone asks for a perennial recommendation for shade, do you answer with those perennial staples and long-time favorites?  Do you want learning more about perennials for shade beyond the basics?  Which plants can you tuck in the shade and it is there that they make a statement in the landscape?  Which...

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Amy Stone
Don't Be A Turkey And Miss The Green Industry Short Course and OTF Conference and Tradeshow Early Registration Deadline - November 25 stone.91 Wed, 11/23/2016 - 11:54

As everyone is busily preparing for Thanksgiving, don't forget that the early registration for the 2016 Green Industry Short Course and the Ohio Turfgrass Foundation Conference and Tradeshow is Friday, November 25- it is like getting two educational programs for the price of one and the early bird registration discount is just another added bonus! 

 

There is also a group discount for the same business or organization who will be sending 5 or more employees. 

 

The event will be held at the Great Columbus Convention Center.  Pre-conference workshops are...

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Amy Stone
Shrubs of the Week: Rosa rugosa Plus chatfield.1 Tue, 11/22/2016 - 14:51

{The images and writing for this bygl-alert is from Joe Cochran, the Curator of OSU’s Secrest Arboretum at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster, Ohio}

  What a difference a day makes!  I awoke Saturday morning, November 19, to cold, blowing flurries along Granny Creek in Knox County. It was a mere 14 hours prior that I was strolling through the arboretum in short sleeves marveling at the autumn splendors. On trying to decide on a Shrub of the Week, it was soon evident that it would need to be Shrubs of the Week. It was the middle of November and the...

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Jim Chatfield
New ALB Infestation Found in Clermont County, OH boggs.47 Fri, 11/18/2016 - 17:10
A news release has been issued regarding a new Asian longhorned beetle infestation found in Clermont Count, OH.
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Joe Boggs
Tree of the Week: Ginkgo biloba chatfield.1 Fri, 11/18/2016 - 16:17

  Ginkgo leaves this past week or weekend or this very day are falling, or have fallen, or are still dangling golden earrings on the tree, or yet have a touch of green, or fall with the first snow: All at once, almost quantum-esque, depending upon location, within Ohio, or on one side of the street, or dependent upon the condition of the tree. Don’t believe me: check it out.  It is certainly one thing though: The Tree of the Week. Or is it merely one, or is it two, or both one and/or two?. Read on.

 

...

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Jim Chatfield
A Good Time to Scout for Calico Scale boggs.47 Fri, 11/18/2016 - 09:24
Some of the most productive scouting for insect tree pests occurs once trees lose their leaves in autumn.  If effective pest suppression tactics can't be applied in the fall, detecting insect pests at this time of the year will at least allow you to plan ahead for next season.
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Joe Boggs
Learn The Latest on Invasives at the OSU Green Industry Short Course stone.91 Thu, 11/17/2016 - 04:40

While invasive species are on everyone's radar, do you know the latest? A great way to hear about the latest updates when it comes to invasive plants, insects and diseases is to attend the Ohio State University Green Industry Short Course and the Ohio Turfgrass Foundation Conference and Tradeshow in December at the Greater Columbus Convention Center. 

 

Joe Boggs and Amy Stone will be updating participants on invasive species in Ohio with updates from the field and what you can do to help with these battles on Wednesday, December 7. 

 

Kathy Smith will be...

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Amy Stone
OSU Green Industry Short Course and OTF Conference and Tradeshow - December 5 - 8 stone.91 Thu, 11/17/2016 - 03:48

Tis' the season to register for the upcoming Ohio State University Green Industry Short Course and the Ohio Turfgrass Foundation Conference and Tradeshow!  While we haven't seen any snow yet, predictions are in the weekend forecast for at least the northeastern region of Ohio. 

 

Three preconference workshops will be offered Monday, December 5 and the program runs fromTuesday, December 6 through Thursday, December 8. There is still time to register at the early bird price but don't delay. Register before November 25 for the discounted price. More than five people attending...

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Amy Stone
First Freeze of Year in NW Ohio stone.91 Sat, 11/12/2016 - 07:27

Well we knew we could not avoid it forever.  The fall temperatures have been enjoyable.  Last night in NW Ohio, temperatures dipped to 25F.  Our average first freeze of the fall season occurs about three weeks earlier, and our first average measurable snowfall is just 2 weeks away.  Last night's low temperatures should have finally taken out those annuals and tender perennials that we have gotten to enjoy for an extended time this year.

 

While there were a couple frosts prior to last night's freeze, many herbaceous plants where still going strong.  It has been wonderful to...

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Amy Stone
Viburnum nudum, Part Deux chatfield.1 Tue, 11/08/2016 - 17:41

  Note: As you await tonight’s Election results, situated in front of your TV or at watch parties, here is something horticultural for you to vote upon: should you plant Viburnum nudum?  Read on.  

  On October 28, 2016 we did a bygl-alert for the Shrub of the Week as Viburnum nudum (http://bygl.osu.edu/node/627). Quickly we had some responses noting that, for example “…it might be helpful to include V. nudum's susceptibility to infestation by the Viburnum Leaf Beetle. ...

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Jim Chatfield
Curtis E. Young
Fall Foliage III chatfield.1 Mon, 11/07/2016 - 14:23

  Never-to-be-forgotten fall color continued this past Saturday in Wayne County in northeast Ohio – and I suspect, elsewhere. The red maple (Acer rubrum) above and the other images were all from Saturday morning, November 5, in my yard and the nearby Johnson Woods Nature Preserve near Orrville five miles away.

  Maples held sway in their many iterations, from the luminosity of sugar maples (Acer saccharum) at Johnson Woods, to the unusually foliated hornbeam maple (Acer carpinifolium) in the ChatScape.

 

...

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Jim Chatfield
Shrub of the Week: Common Witchhazel chatfield.1 Sat, 11/05/2016 - 16:38

  {This bygl-alert was written by Paul Snyder, horticulturist with OSU’s Secrest Arboretum at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster. Two pictures were added by Jim Chatfield.  

 

  Members of the genus Hamamelis open and close the season for woody flowering plants. Flowering begins with Hamamelis vernalis and Hamamelis x intermedia hybrids in the spring and end with the flowering of Hamamelis virginiana in the fall and Hamamelis mollis in early winter. One Hamamelis mollis selection, ‘...

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Jim Chatfield
Tree of the Week: Name That Plant chatfield.1 Fri, 11/04/2016 - 10:05

  This tree resides in my front yard, and was a gift from Rich Larson of Dawes Arboretum almost three decades ago after I gave a talk on pests and diseases of trees. Fortunately, this tree in general has few insects or infectious diseases and my gift tree and its multi-stemmed trunks has now grown about 40 feet tall in those 29 years. It is a native tree, but fairly unusual in Ohio woodlands. This tree has intensely lemon-yellow changing to burnt gold fall foliage which was spectacular from late October and now into the first few days of November this year. ...

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Jim Chatfield
Signs of the Times: From Trees to Turtles chatfield.1 Mon, 10/31/2016 - 17:16

  A recent bygl-mail correspondent, Beth Deimling from Lakeland Nursery in Indiana, recently wrote “As wonderfully entertaining authors of BYGL, I thought you might be appreciative of this sign that my husband and I saw while on vacation last month in Wisconsin. Of course, as world travelers, you may have already seen it, or something similar. Thanks for all of your stories, photos, and attempts at educating us!”

  It is a telling sign, as other locales deal with Emerald Ash Borer encroachments. The sign stirs up some memories of other signs of the times:  here are a few...

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Jim Chatfield
Trees on Tap - OSU Green Industry Short Course Pre-Conference Workshop - December 5, 2016 stone.91 Mon, 10/31/2016 - 05:37

You won't want to miss this year's Trees on Tap preconference workshop as part of this year's OSU Green Industry Short Course (GISC), formally the OSU Nursery Short Course. 

 

The preconference workshop will be held on Monday, December 5, 2016 at the Columbus Convention Center.  Registration will be begin at 9:00 am, with the program starting at 9:30 am.  The workshop ends at 4:45 pm, with a workshop reception to follow. 

 

The workshop's agenda include the following topics:  Why Trees Matter; Treesources Must-Haves...

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Amy Stone
Tree of the Week: Korean Maple chatfield.1 Sun, 10/30/2016 - 16:57

  Ever since Kenny Cochran of Secrest Arboretum introduced me to Korean or purple-bloom maple, Acer pseudosieboldianum, and I planted one in my backyard, I have been in wonder of its features. Fall foliage color, of course (more on that later), but years ago after the first years in our laissez-faire landscape, and with it almost making it look like I knew what I was doing, with its elegant form and overarching branches, I brought this up to horticulturist extraordinaire Ethan Johnson of Holden Arboretum. 

  Ethan agreed on the fall color, but noted that in his experience...

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Jim Chatfield
Shrub of the Week: VIburnum nudum chatfield.1 Fri, 10/28/2016 - 13:36

   The text and images for this bygl-alert are by Paul Snyder, horticulturist with OSU’s Secreest Arboretum at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster}

 

  It is typical this time of year to have many tour groups visit Secrest. Planted along some of the paths is a plant that makes everyone stop and say, ‘Wow, what is it?” If you are thinking it is a selection of Malus you are mistaken.

 

...

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Jim Chatfield
Fall Clean Up for a Healthier Spring Landscape! crook.46 Thu, 10/27/2016 - 10:06

Fall is an important time in landscape maintenance.  Many pest problems and diseases encountered this season may survive until next season on or in plant debris.  Cultural practices completed prior to the beginning of winter will ensure a healthier landscape for next spring. 

Some of the fall crops can still be left in the garden for a while, however warm season vegetables are about done for the season.  Remove all annual vegetable plants from garden beds in order to prevent overwintering insect and diseases.  Diseased plants should not be composted unless the compost pile reaches...

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Julie Crook
Tree of the Week: Osage-Orange (Maclura pomifera, family Moreaceae (mulberry family)) boggs.47 Wed, 10/26/2016 - 14:05
If you can look past the large fruits currently dropping from this native tree (unless one drops on your windshield) and select more mannerly cultivars of this tough native tree, Osage-orange can be a go-to tree for difficult urban sites.
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Joe Boggs
Did You Know? It's Bat Week! titchenell.4 Tue, 10/25/2016 - 15:13

What IS Bat week, you ask? Bat Week is an annual, international celebration of the role of bats in nature. This year, Bat Week is right now! It started October 24th and runs through October 31st. Bat Week is organized by a team of conservation organizations and government agencies from across the United States and Canada with the goal of raising awareness and promoting conservation of bat species around the world.

 

...
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Marne Titchenell
Help Needed in Gray Fox Study titchenell.4 Tue, 10/25/2016 - 15:01

Calling all trappers! Trappers who catch gray fox this season are asked to contact the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Wildlife if gray foxes are caught. The Division of Wildlife is pursuing a gray fox study and requests the help of trappers in capturing study animals. Foxes caught that are deemed suitable for collaring and release will receive $40.00. NOTE: Only gray fox caught in the following counties are eligible: Athens, Belmont, Coshocton, Gallia, Fairfield, Guernsey, Hocking, Jackson, Lawrence, Meigs, Monroe, Morgan, Muskingum, Noble, Perry, Pike, Ross,...

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Marne Titchenell
Halloween Hopper Horror Show boggs.47 Mon, 10/24/2016 - 12:45
Hundreds of grasshopper cadavers in various stages disintegration clinging to plant stems aren't a macabre Halloween decoration. They are the handiwork of Summit Disease.
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Joe Boggs
Fall Color, Part Deux chatfield.1 Sun, 10/23/2016 - 16:02

  We have visited fall color themes with several recent bygl-alerts (http://bygl.osu.edu/node/612; http://bygl.osu.edu/node/603; http://bygl.osu.edu/node/602), and as the season progresses it just keeps getting richer. Following are some additional Season of 2016 features. And the lead picture above, though it looks like it comes from the Smokies or from Almost Heaven, is just from my backyard, with fall foliage rising from the strawberry fields forever of the...

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Jim Chatfield
Oaks, and Fall, and Propagation: Oh My! chatfield.1 Fri, 10/21/2016 - 15:01

  {This bygl-alert is from Paul Snyder, horticulturist at OSU’s Secrest Arboretum at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster, with a small assist from Jim Chatfield.}

  Note: The image above is of Chestnut Oak (Quercus prinus) acorns.  Members of the white oak group, like chestnut oak, should be planted immediately after collecting. The radicle (the first part of the plant embryo to emerge from the seed) comes out in the fall.

  Fall is here and that means trees are releasing their fruits produced over the summer. For squirrels and other...

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Jim Chatfield
Shrub of the Week: Buttonbush chatfield.1 Thu, 10/20/2016 - 10:21

  Native plants are all the rage in the plant world (apart from new hydrangea cultivars), and rightfully so―they are well adapted to our climate and zone, and serve as a host for a variety of insects, birds, and other wildlife. Indeed, when we plant a landscape we aren’t just making an area look nice. Rather, we are creating an ecosystem.

  A native plant that shines this time of year is Cephalanthus occidentalis, Buttonbush. This plant is commonly thought of only for its globular white flowers in summer. Yet this member of the Rubiaceae is attractive all season. Glossy...

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Jim Chatfield
Signs and Symptoms: A Tale of Two Tar Spots chatfield.1 Wed, 10/19/2016 - 10:13

  As noted earlier (http://bygl.osu.edu/node/525) there are two common tar spots of maple seen in Ohio.  One, that occurs commonly on silver and red maple results in dense, tarry spots caused by the fungus, Rhytisma acerinum. A second tar spot disease is typically found on Norway maple, with multiple tiny tarry spots that eventually coalesce into a larger spot, not quite as “tarry” but nonetheless black in color, caused by the fungus  Rhytisma punctatum.

 

...

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Jim Chatfield
Fall Home Invaders: spiders, stink bugs, and more! kulhanek.5 Mon, 10/17/2016 - 12:49

The calls have begun.  Insects and spiders are being found inside homes around Medina, and I suspect many other counties in Ohio.  Fall brings an annual immigration of all sorts of arthropods but this is not meant to be a halloween horror, but a normal part of the life cycle and survival of many creepy (or cute!) crawlies.

 

Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs

...

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Ashley Kulhanek
Spotted Wing Drosophila in Raspberries kulhanek.5 Mon, 10/17/2016 - 11:41
I received a report of "white worms" in fall-bearing raspberries associated with the activity of the non-native invasive pest, Spotted Wing Drosophila (Drosophila suzukii).  Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) is a tiny fly, nearly indistinguishable from our native common vinegar flies (also called fruit flies) without a magnifying device. (Photo courtesy of Jim Jasinski, OSU Integrated Pest Management Coordinator)
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Ashley Kulhanek
Read All About It! chatfield.1 Mon, 10/17/2016 - 09:01

  The love of books. As promised, here are the first five books to know about, read, teach your co-horts and fellow naturalists about, and to treat yourself and others to for the upcoming holidays. 

 

  1. A Sand County Almanac – Aldo Leopold. A naturalist’s classic.
  2. Seeing Trees – Nancy R. Hugo and Richard Llewellyn. Photographic and written essays of the annual life of trees.
  3. Manual of Woody Landscape Plants – Michael Dirr.  Must have for reference and priceless observations and perspectives.
  4. The Invention of...
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Jim Chatfield
Banded Garden Spider boggs.47 Sun, 10/16/2016 - 12:09
The banded garden spider (Argiope trifasciata) is found throughout Ohio; however, it may be easily overlooked in favor of its slightly larger and more stunningly colored cousin; the yellow garden spider (A. aurantia).
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Joe Boggs
Curtis E. Young
Seasonal Needle Coloration chatfield.1 Fri, 10/14/2016 - 13:57

  Many of us are aware that pines and other narrow-leaved trees and shrubs that we term “evergreen”, do lose inner needles in the fall and sometimes in the spring, most noticeably on white pine. Others of us, though having seen it all our lives, may not have noticed (“The true voyage of discovery lies not in finding new landscapes, but in having new eyes” – Proust).  

  For those who are aware, “Remember what it was like not to know”, and teach others well.  Speaking of teaching this, no-one said it better than Aldo Leopold in his “A Sand County Almanac” (1949), a...

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Jim Chatfield
Perennial of the Week: New England Aster crook.46 Fri, 10/14/2016 - 13:42

New England aster (Symphyotrichumnovae-angliae) is an excellent plant for the fall garden.  In addition to providing color in the landscape, it also is a late-season source of pollen for bees and other pollinators.  New England aster is native to much of the Eastern US and its purple daisy-like flowers can be seen in fields in bloom now.  It blooms from late summer through October. This plant prefers moist, rich soils but will tolerate clay soils, and some drought once established.  New England aster grows well in a sunny location but can also succeed in partial shade.  This plant...

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Julie Crook
New Worker Protection Compliance Manual Now Available rose.155 Wed, 10/12/2016 - 12:17
The must-read manual for growers on the 2015 revised Worker Protection Standard (WPS) is now available. Horticultural growers such as greenhouses and nurseries will be most affected by these changes because of the numbers of workers they employ.  Retailers are also affected if pesticides are applied to holding areas. 
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Mimi Rose
White-tailed Deer Road Watch titchenell.4 Wed, 10/12/2016 - 09:11

White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) provide abundant recreation opportunities for hunters and wildlife watchers. Unfortunately, they can also cost us millions of dollars every year. How? Imagine you are driving down a poorly lit road at night when all of the sudden a deer appears on the road in front of you. Despite your honking and screeching breaks, the animal remains frozen in its tracks, exhibiting to perfection 'a deer in headlights'. Deer vehicle collisions are incredibly dangerous and often costly. So listen up motorists, now is the time when deer are on the move and...

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Marne Titchenell
Alarum Alarum Erratum Erratum: Nettles and Azaleas and My Red Face, Oh My chatfield.1 Tue, 10/11/2016 - 17:14

  To err is human, so I must most certainly be massively, essentially human. To the point, two such bygl-alert errors of mine due for acknowledgment come from two of my favorite plantspersons: Charles Tubesing of Holden Arboretum and Ron Wilson of Natorp’s Nursery

  First, to an egregious error most nettlesome. In http://bygl.osu.edu/node/596 I wrote of fruits of what I called “stinging nettle”.  As Charles pointed out these may be nettles that sting, but the plant I saw and the pictures of fruits and the wedge-shaped leaves I showed were...

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Jim Chatfield
Autumn Light chatfield.1 Tue, 10/11/2016 - 11:09

Autumn light is different from summer light: more golden, as light rays lengthen, with longer shadows.  While there is time, and while the blue skies we have enjoyed all growing season fade to gray as winter beckons, go forth and catch some slanted sun-rays of autumn.  Enjoy the full life of fall.  

  The past few days have brought out the colors of flowering dogwood (Cornus florida), often neglected when the best fall foliage plants are listed. As the lead picture shows it is wonderful now, and its fat flower buds promise springtime reprisals.

  Next, enjoy the...

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Jim Chatfield
Shrub of the Week: Purple Beauty Berry chatfield.1 Mon, 10/10/2016 - 14:16

{Photos and text for this bgyl-alert are provided by Joe Cochran, the Curator of OSU’s Secrest Arboretum at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster.}

 

  The fruits of purple beauty berry  (Callicarpa dichotoma) are among the most splendid of the fall-fruiting shrubs.  On arching branches, small delicate fruits appear to be glossy pearls that have been dipped in a lilac-violet varnish.  Against the light-green foliage their beauty cannot go unnoticed.  Growing 4-5 ft. with a slightly larger spread, the tips often reach to the ground. A...

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Jim Chatfield
Fruits of Fall chatfield.1 Sun, 10/09/2016 - 23:12

  Fall is for foliage, but also for – fruits.  We sometimes miss this for landscape plants, blinded by apples and apple cider and the final harvests from summer gardens. Yet there is much to enjoy.  So here is a short view of a few of The Fruits of Orrville, Ohio (Wayne County) with a finale the finale from Otterbein University in Franklin County.

 

  We started above with the bubble-gum colored fruits of Symphoricarpos. I am not sure of the species or cultivar of this particular street-planted beauty, though possibly it is Amethyst™ Symphoricarpos x...

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Jim Chatfield
Fall Foliage I chatfield.1 Sat, 10/08/2016 - 14:06

  We are entering that world-class time of the year for Ohio and the Eastern United States – the time of fall foliage color. Nevertheless, we are receiving numerous calls about what is wrong with their trees, especially honeylocusts; yellowing leaves and all.

  Nothing out of the ordinary – it is simply fall foliage time. Despite our warm temperatures and with it seeming like it is still summer - for trees - fall is proceeding as usual. There are factors of temperature and moisture that affect fall coloration intensity, but the key ingredient for fall color starts in the summer at...

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Jim Chatfield
Tree of the Week: Dawnredwood chatfield.1 Fri, 10/07/2016 - 10:25

  I once wrote a poem of the seasons of dawnredwood, Metasequoia glyptostroboides.  Let us deconstruct, starting with the name of this majestic tree, for as the Chinese philosopher Krishtalka noted: “The beginning of wisdom is calling things by their right name.”

  The Latin binomial itself is telling: “meta-sequoia” means “like-sequoia”, and dawnredwoods are related, in the Cupressaceae family, to the true redwoods, Sequoia and Sequoiadendron. The “glyptostrob-oides” refers to another sister genus in the Cupressaceae, Glyptostrobus....

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Jim Chatfield
Weekly Weed: Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense) boggs.47 Thu, 10/06/2016 - 13:51
Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense, family Poaceae) is a non-native perennial grassy weed that is becoming a serious problem in Ohio landscapes and nurseries.
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Joe Boggs
Black Fungal Growth and Distilleries boggs.47 Thu, 10/06/2016 - 11:45
Monday's 19th Annual Bluegrass-Buckeye BYGLive! (BBB) was held at the Buffalo Trace Distillery in Frankfort, KY, where participants viewed the handiwork of the distillery fungus, Baudoinia compniacensis.
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Joe Boggs
Edible Crabapple of the Week: Maypole chatfield.1 Mon, 10/03/2016 - 17:29
  Springtime comes to Autumn in the Eugene and Judy Pouly Domaine and Chatfield tables this evening: we shall be dancing around our Maypoles. No, we have not fast-forwarded the seasons. Instead we are enjoying the fruits of springtime flowers. To the point, ‘Maypole’ crabapple fruits turned into sauce so sweet and yet so sour.
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Jim Chatfield
Weed of the Week: Stinging Nettle chatfield.1 Sun, 10/02/2016 - 13:41

  At Johnson Woods Nature Preserve near Orrville in Wayne County, there are many wonderful plants including towering oaks and beeches and sourgums.  There are birds including barred owls that are a hoot to hear in matched pairs from across the preserve.  This past weekend the fungi were having a real coming out party following recent rains.  Squirrels, including black squirrels, were clucking away. And stinging nettles were fruiting; something I had never noticed before.  

 

...

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Jim Chatfield
Umbrellaland chatfield.1 Thu, 09/29/2016 - 11:31
  The Umbrella Magnolia Grove (Magnolia tripetala) at OSU’s Secrest Arboretum in Wooster, for almost a century was a revered place: a protected place from non-lightning rainstorms, a place for rituals of many a kind, a wow place for children, a favorite of now-retired Secrest curator, Ken Cochran.
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Jim Chatfield
Sweetgum Webworm / Leafroller boggs.47 Wed, 09/28/2016 - 19:56
I came across a small webworm nest yesterday in an American sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua). It strongly resembled an early instar Fall Webworm (Hyphantria cunea) nest; however, fall webworms are just about finished for the season. 
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Joe Boggs
Pythium and Phytophthora Pummel Pumpkins in NE Ohio draper.15 Wed, 09/28/2016 - 19:28

In the past few weeks, I have received multiple questions from farmers growing pumpkins, asking what is going on with the pumpkins!  When pressed about what they were seeing, the response is always a “come out and see for yourself” and so I usually do!  For me, plant problem diagnostics are ALWAYS more accurate and effective when done hands-on, using my own senses and asking those pertinent or impertinent questions to get at the answers!  In these cases of the great pumpkin patch puzzle, they would pick perfectly healthy looking pumpkins, wash the dirt off of rinds and put them into bins...

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Erik Draper
Ratty Redbuds boggs.47 Wed, 09/28/2016 - 14:01
Although the growing season is winding down, Extension offices in Ohio are continuing to receive questions regarding redbud leaves turning brown after being folded over or "glued" together.  The culprit is the Redbud Leaffolder (Fascista cercerisella; order Lepidoptera; family Gelechiidae).
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Joe Boggs
Bristly Roseslugs Continue to Cause Damage boggs.47 Wed, 09/28/2016 - 11:53
The native Common Roseslug Sawfly and Curled Roseslug have largely been supplanted by the non-native Bristly Roseslug Sawfly. This sawfly has multiple generations per season with the larvae continuing to produce feeding damage.
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Joe Boggs
A Tale of Two Visitors chatfield.1 Tue, 09/27/2016 - 12:19
  English ivy (Hedera helix) and wintercreeper euonymus (Euonymus fortunei) are two non-native climbers we are all accustomed to seeing in Ohio landscapes.  Horticulturists and natural area managers often have very different perspectives on these species here in Ohio and in areas, wanted and unwanted, where they grow. What is your “nature and nurture” perspective?
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Jim Chatfield
Planting/Transplanting Perennials in Early Fall Requires a Little Extra TLC bennett.27 Tue, 09/27/2016 - 11:28

The recommended time for planting or transplanting perennials is late August or early September.  This gives adequate time for roots to establish before winter comes.  However, like most gardeners, I don't usually think about it in late August and besides, this year was too hot to take on this task anyways.

 

I finally got around to it this past weekend and the weather was glorious to work outside.  I needed to transplant a few perennials as well as plant some that I bought at a plant sale in the spring.  Yes, I am a little behind but I really didn't want to plant them...

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Pam Bennett
Mushroom is Magnificent! draper.15 Tue, 09/27/2016 - 08:03

A local arborist called me one day and asked if it was possible that I could identify a mushroom.  Sure, I said I could do that and reminded him that identification is always much easier if a sample was dropped off for me to examine.  Later, as I rehearsed our conversation, I remember hearing him chuckle and then saying, “Well, you’re going to love this one”.   I was thinking through a couple of types and shapes of typical mushrooms when I walked into my office the next morning.  You can imagine my surprise when I spied on my desk, the huge fruiting body of Bondarzewia berkeleyi ...

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Erik Draper
Woolly Bears on the Move boggs.47 Mon, 09/26/2016 - 14:38
Bristly "woolly bear" caterpillars have started their annual crawl-about in search of sheltered locations where they will spend the winter.  They may be found on sidewalks and walking trails or on the walls of homes and buildings.  Some may be slowly making their way to Vermillion, Ohio, to attend an annual festival held in their honor.
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Joe Boggs
From Webworms to "We All Scream": Walks in Wooster chatfield.1 Mon, 09/26/2016 - 13:33
  Over the past five weeks, Wooster Ohio, home of two great institutions of higher education, a liberal arts institution - the College of Wooster, and a land grant institution, Ohio State University’s Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, and the City of Wooster have provided ample photographic opportunities for horticulturalisms and botanizing. Here are a few, from my light and dark perspectives: 
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Jim Chatfield
Lazarus Lizards Rise in Cincinnati boggs.47 Mon, 09/26/2016 - 11:26
If you're hiking around Cincinnati on a warm sunny day and spot a lizard scurrying over rock walls or rocky slopes, it's likely to be the non-native European wall lizard (Podarcis muralis).  However, if you ask a Cincinnatian to identify the lizard, they will most likely call it the "Lazarus lizard."
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Joe Boggs
Beetles on Goldenrod boggs.47 Mon, 09/26/2016 - 09:55
Goldenrod (Solidago spp.) is in full bloom throughout the state.  Soldier beetles (Chauliognathus pennsylvanicus, family Cantharidae) and locust borer adults (Megacyllene robiniae, family Cerambycidae) are commonly found on the flowers of this beautiful native plant adding to the plant's interest to entomophiles.
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Joe Boggs
Orange Dogs and Family Matters boggs.47 Sun, 09/25/2016 - 18:36

I recently came across a bizarre looking caterpillar - it looked like bird poo - while looking on a wafer ash (Ptelea trifoliate) for the white, frothy "egg plugs" of the two-marked treehopper (Enchenopa binotata) and admiring some heavy potato leafhopper (Empoasca fabae) damage.  I learned the bizarre looking caterpillar has an appropriately bizarre sounding common name:  the orange dog.

 

The orange dog (sometimes called orange puppy) caterpillar is the larval stage of the eastern giant swallowtail butterfly (Papilio cresphontes).  As...

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Joe Boggs
Wafer Ash Leaves Fading to White boggs.47 Sun, 09/25/2016 - 18:29
Wafer ash (Ptelea trifoliate) which is also known as common hoptree or stinking ash has garnered considerable landscape interest in recent years owing to its native status in Ohio. However, wafer ash is also a potato leafhopper (Empoasca fabae) magnate.
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Joe Boggs
Shrub of the Week: Rhus chatfield.1 Sat, 09/24/2016 - 09:26
    When considering adding a touch of fall color to your landscape, don’t forget the sumacs.  Belonging to the family Anacardiaceae, some of their notable relatives include cashew, pistachio, mango, smokebush, and even poison ivy and poison sumac.  The genus Rhus, consists of around 35 species and grows in subtropical and temperate regions throughout the world, especially in East Asia, Africa, and North America.
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Jim Chatfield
Weed of the Week: Maximilian Sunflower (Helianthus maximiliani) boggs.47 Fri, 09/23/2016 - 17:06
I've received some helpful educational feedback in response to my BYGL Alert posted earlier today extolling the virtues of Maximilian Sunflower  (Helianthus maximiliani) [See Hort Shorts; Perennial of the Week:  Maximilian Sunflower  (Helianthus maximiliani)].
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Joe Boggs
Perennial of the Week: Maximilian Sunflower (Helianthus maximiliani) boggs.47 Fri, 09/23/2016 - 11:49
This native member of the Aster family (Asteraceae) has become one of my top favorite plants for naturalized areas.  Of course, there are no perfect plants; Maximilian Sunflowers mix a multitude of virtues with a few imperfections.
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Joe Boggs
Goldenrod is Glorious in Geauga! draper.15 Wed, 09/21/2016 - 19:40
It is a weed of waste places, which turns wherever it grows into a yellow-gold slice of sunshine on the ground, is Solidago spp. or more commonly known to many as the annoying weed, Goldenrod.  While it is known as a weed, it also provides a vibrant splash of color to the edges of fields, in ditches and other abandoned or disturbed sites.
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Erik Draper
Root of the Matter chatfield.1 Wed, 09/21/2016 - 14:48
  Tonight I am doing a program at Secrest Arboretum in the Ohio Chapter of the International Society of Arboriculture series for arborist certification. We will be learning together about “Tree Biology”, so let’s remind ourselves – and teach others – about “the root of the matter.”  Here are four maxims about the critical, but often overlooked by many, key to plant health: roots.
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Jim Chatfield
Joe Boggs
Erik Draper
Flowerosophy chatfield.1 Wed, 09/21/2016 - 10:07
  Flowers are, of course, wondrous, the birds and the bees and all that, the pollen grain germinating on the receptive stigma with the pollen tube then delivering sperm nuclei to the ovules below, with the thus fertilized eggs becoming seeds surrounded by the ovary ripening into the fruit. Flowers may be inconspicuous, but they may also may be beauteous; here are a few captured by camera this past week
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Jim Chatfield
Perennial of the Week: Ironweed kulhanek.5 Tue, 09/20/2016 - 12:28

Here at the Medina Extension Office, we have Ironweed (Vernonia spp.) planted among other native and annual flowers outside.  And every year people visit our office just to ask, "What is that giant purple flower!?"  Its purple flowers are quite an eye catcher and, despite having "weed" in its name, ironweed's late blooms in summer to fall and brilliant color make it an attractive native wildflower for many gardeners.

...

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Ashley Kulhanek
A Very Unusual Leaf Gall boggs.47 Mon, 09/19/2016 - 16:52
A number of interesting plant galls look so much like fungal structures that for years they were misidentified as a fungal plant disease.  Such is the case with the goldenrod leaf galls associated with the midge fly, Asteromyia carbonifera.
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Joe Boggs
Tactile Paving and Truncated Domes chatfield.1 Mon, 09/19/2016 - 13:14
  One of the joys of horticulture is the variety of people all of us meet and all of our different experiences and knowledge. With that in mind, earlier this year I learned about the world of truncated domes and tactile paving. 
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Jim Chatfield
Diagnostics: Who Knows Most About the Plants? chatfield.1 Sun, 09/18/2016 - 23:57
  On Vesey Street in downtown Manhattan, between the 9/11 memorials and the Irish Hunger Memorial along the Hudson River, is a row of Chinese elms in a streetscape. Recently, as I was walking there I noticed two of the elms with thinning foliage, and for that matter they were set apart by big-time protective railings and stakings and alone among the row, Treegators, extra factors that turned out to be mostly non-sequiturs, but did initially catch my eye.
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Jim Chatfield
Fall Forecast II chatfield.1 Sun, 09/18/2016 - 17:38
  Earlier this week Extensioneer Erik Draper featured poison ivy foliar coloration as a Harbinger of Autumn (http://bygl.osu.edu/node/567). As we approach September 22 and the Autumnal Equinox, here are a few more visuals of the changing of the guard.
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Jim Chatfield
Basswood Leafminer Found in Southwest Ohio boggs.47 Sat, 09/17/2016 - 09:35
BYGL readers should be familiar with the Basswood Leafminer (Baliosus nervosus; previously Baliosus ruber).  We've reported on the skeletonizing and leafmining activities of this native beetle for years.  High populations cause entire trees to become reddish-brown, usually in mid-to-late August.
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Joe Boggs
Curtis E. Young
Tree of the Week: Swamp White Oak chatfield.1 Fri, 09/16/2016 - 11:18

I was recently in New York City, 15 years after the 9/11 tragedy, and was reminded of that day. We were on our BYGL call back here in Ohio and Dave Dyke of OSUE, Hamilton County broke into a plant report with news that a plane, possibly a small plane had flown into the World Trade Center. We took it in and continued our reports.

 

  Minutes later he burst in that another plane had hit the other tower and that these were large passenger planes. Now we knew something was terribly wrong and yet, like many people, we tried to continue with our scheduled activities for a while....

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Jim Chatfield
Shrub of the Week: Comptonia (Sweetfern) chatfield.1 Fri, 09/16/2016 - 09:35
 This plant is not a fern. Rather, Sweetfern is a native woody shrub. According to E. Lucy Braun (The Woody Plants of Ohio), it is only found in a few counties in Ohio where it inhabits open oak forests, pastures, and roadsides. This plant fits into the category of small shrubs that many homeowners are looking for, maturing at a height of 2-4’.
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Jim Chatfield
There We Go...The Harbinger of Autumn Appears! draper.15 Thu, 09/15/2016 - 21:32

As I was driving along the roadways of Geauga County, I suddenly noticed the upright pillars of changing color wrapped around tree trunks.  Yes, I believe that it is most likely, that autumnal color is the ONLY redeeming quality of Toxicodendron radicans, commonly known as Poison Ivy!  At this time of year, the fall colors of this rash inducing woody vine, are unparalleled for their stunning reds, oranges, yellows and every color mixture in-between.  It almost makes one want to go up to collect some leaves to put in a fall color collage between pieces of waxed paper to hang on the...

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Erik Draper
Small White Masses on Red Bud Stems boggs.47 Sun, 09/11/2016 - 18:20
Small white masses appearing in late summer on redbud stems have become a common occurrence in recent years.  The masses look like a soft scale, mealybug, or perhaps an insect egg mass.  In fact, they are the sticky, frothy "egg plugs" of a treehopper and they may also be found on black walnut, wafer ash, and viburnum.
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Joe Boggs
Tree of the Week: Kentucky Coffeetree chatfield.1 Sun, 09/11/2016 - 16:47
  Kentucky coffeetree is a native tree that is planted as a tough urban survivor in streetscapes, and is tolerant of limey soils and tree pits (Chicago urban foresters list it as one of their five toughest street trees). It has a starkly coarse yet beautiful appearance in the winter landscape, and its fairly early fall defoliation and late spring foliation make it perfect if long seasons of sun penetration are desired.
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Jim Chatfield
Trees and Lightning stone.91 Sun, 09/11/2016 - 11:47

Recent storms that have moved through northwest Ohio have brought some much needed rain.  Some of that rain has been accompanied by lightning, high winds and even tornados.  The large oak pictured with this article was strike by lightning resulting in the outward symptom a "lightning scar." 

 

As I was searching for additional information when writing this article, I came across a FactSheet from Purdue University, Trees and Lightning.   It is an excellent resource and describes the range of damage to the tree that can occur during and after a lightning strike.  The...

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Amy Stone
Rare Caterpillar Attends 83rd Ohio Plant Diagnostic Workshop boggs.47 Sat, 09/10/2016 - 12:12
Thanks to the sharp eyes of Erik 'The Caterpillar Hunter' Draper (OSU Extension, Geauga County), this very rare caterpillar made an appearance at yesterday's 83rd Ohio Plant Diagnostic Workshop.  The Paddle Caterpillar is the larval form of the Funerary Dagger Moth (Acronicta funeralis, family Noctuidae).
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Joe Boggs
Mushrooms in the Yard: To Eat or Not to Eat has been a Common Question young.2 Thu, 09/08/2016 - 13:26

With the return of more regular rains in some areas of Ohio, mushroom production in lawns seems to be going gang busters.  Some view these mushrooms as a mere nuisance, some are freaked out by their presence, and some want to make a meal out of them.  STOP!  One must have an absolute, positive identification before dining on these "free" mushrooms.

 

...
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Curtis E. Young
Annual of the Week: Common Sunflower (Helianthus annuus). boggs.47 Thu, 09/08/2016 - 11:04
Common Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) is one of the most striking annual flowers in our landscapes, flower gardens, and agricultural fields.  The scientific name for the genus comes from the Greek helios which means "sun" and anthos which means "flower."
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Joe Boggs
Boogie-Woogie Aphid Takes Center Stage boggs.47 Thu, 09/08/2016 - 10:55
Over the years, the late-season Beech Blight Aphid (Grylloprociphilus imbricator) has waltzed through the pages of the BYGL on an annual basis.  The aphids have a single venue; they are only found on the twigs and branches of American beech (Fagus grandifolia). 
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Joe Boggs
Ode to Joy: A Walk in the Park and German VIllage chatfield.1 Wed, 09/07/2016 - 09:14

  The first image of a caladium and coleus window box above is from a walk I took a few weeks ago with the Ohio Nursery Landscape Association’s Executive Director Frits Risor through German Village and Schiller Park there, and then later in the day checking out the crape myrtles planted in landscapes a little further north near ONLA’s World Headquarters in Westerville. A few other items we saw include:

 

...

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Jim Chatfield
Cedar Rust Fungi Aecial Tubes Now Evident chatfield.1 Tue, 09/06/2016 - 14:32

  For the last month the fungal tubes of the “aecial” stage of several cedar rust fungi, namely cedar-apple rust (Gymonsporangium juniper-virginianae) and cedar-hawthorn rust (G. globosum) have been evident on leaf undersides of hawthorns, as seen in the accompanying picture.

  These rust fungi spend about a year and half on certain junipers (in the Cupressaceae family) before microscopic spores of the fungus oozing from galls on the juniper blow in the spring to certain genera in the Rosaceae family such as hawthorns and apples and crabapples.

 

...

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Jim Chatfield
Jack-o'-Lantern Mushrooms chatfield.1 Tue, 09/06/2016 - 12:17

  I was driving home the other day, and on a bank, under an oak tree, there were some electrifyingly-orange mushrooms cascading down a small slope. BYGL-alert screamed out at me, so let’s take a look. Delightful as they looked to the eye, these would seem to be jack-o’-lantern mushrooms, probably Omphalotus olearius. This mushroom may cause serious gastric distress to those who partake. It is a reminder that you really need to get a positive identification before taking a chance on nature gone wild.

 

...

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Jim Chatfield
Curtis E. Young
Mantids are Lurking boggs.47 Mon, 09/05/2016 - 14:37
This is the time of the year when it seems that praying mantids are everywhere.  I collected this mantid today from our window screen.  However, the perception that there are more mantids at this time of the season is based on the size of the mantids, not total numbers.
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Joe Boggs
Bounding Grasshoppers and Katydids boggs.47 Sat, 09/03/2016 - 10:14
While checking on the status of goldenrod bloom in a park in southwest Ohio yesterday, I kept finding myself surrounded by hordes of hop happy grasshoppers and katydids.  Each step that I took launched hundreds.
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Joe Boggs
Shrub of the Week: Northern Bayberry chatfield.1 Sat, 09/03/2016 - 00:15
  Northern bayberry (Myrica pensylvanica):  Very aromatic foliage, a great winter food source for birds, tolerates salt spray and poor soils, along with being a native, this certainly makes northern bayberry a consideration for many landscapes. 
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Jim Chatfield
Big Wheel Bugs are Rolling Along: Mea Culpa boggs.47 Fri, 09/02/2016 - 12:16
“Sometimes I lie awake at night, and ask, 'Where have I gone wrong?' Then a voice says to me, 'This is going to take more than one night.'”  (Charlie Brown).
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Joe Boggs
Tree of the Week: Seven-Son Flower chatfield.1 Fri, 09/02/2016 - 10:51

 The months-long florescent reign o