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See You at the 2019 Ohio State University Green Industry Short Course

The 2019 Ohio State University Green Industry Short Course is just 4 weeks away. The Short Course will be held on December 3, 4 and 5 at the Columbus Convention Center in collaboration with the Ohio Turfgrass Foundation Conference and Show. Participants will need register through OTF and can attend educational sessions at both the Short Course and the OTF Conference. It is like two programs in one! 
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Authors
Amy Stone

Putting Ash Wood to Good Use - Lessons from the Urban Wood Network

Earlier this month, Emerald Ash Borer University (EABU) hosted an online webiner entitled, "Putting Ash Wood to Good Use - Lessons from the Urban Wood Network." While many of us from Ohio have already lived through the devastation of EAB; some may have utilized the ash, some may have not, but either way, you will enjoy the webinar presented by Don Peterson, executive director of the Urban Wood Network.  
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Authors
Amy Stone

Hemlock Woolly Adegid – A 2019 update

In mid-October 2019, Jim Chatfield, Amy Stone, and Thomas deHaas attended the Central Appalachian Spruce Restoration Initiative (CASRI) to discuss conifer health, specifically, Canadian Hemlock (Tsuga Canadensis) and hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae) (HWA). HWA was first discovered in West Virginia in 1992.
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Authors
Thomas deHaas
Jim Chatfield
Amy Stone

Weird Willow Galls

Willow Pinecone Galls are produced by the Willow Pinecone Gall Midge, Rabdophaga strobiloides (family Cecidomyiidae), to house, nourish, and protect a single fly larva (maggot) located deep within the gall. The elaborate structures bear a striking resemblance to a pine cone complete with faux seed scales.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Last Hurrah for Willow Sawfly

Kris Stone, Director of the Boone County Arboretum and horticulturist extraordinaire, texted images this past Friday of Willow Sawfly (Nematus ventralis) larvae chowing down on the leaves of a Dewystem Willow (Salix irrorata) in his home landscape. It was a reminder that although the plant pest season may be drawing to a close, it ain't over 'til it's over.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

The National Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) Eradication Program Scores a "Win"

Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) is potentially the most devastating non-native pest to have ever arrived in North America. The beetle kills trees belonging to 12 genera in 9 plant families. This includes all native maples, a preferred host. The ripple effect across many forest ecosystems also means the potential loss of plant and animal species dependent upon those ecosystems.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Workshop on Treating for Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (HWA) and Elongate Hemlock Scale (EHS)

Tom Macy (Forest Health Program Administrator, Division of Forestry, Ohio Department of Natural Resources) has organized a workshop on treatment options for two non-native invasive pests threatening hemlock in Ohio: hemlock Woolly Adelgid (HWA) and Elongate Hemlock Scale (EHS).
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Authors
Joe Boggs
Dave Shetlar

Fall Color may Indicate MORE than the approach of Autumn!

I received a call recently from Miguel Preza, the Integrated Pest Manager for a local nursery about the onset of early fall color. He said something very helpful, “If the tree or shrub looks different than the others, take a closer look. In a planting of red Maples Acer rubrum, a couple of trees were showing fall color ahead of the others. On closer inspection, the trees in color were infested with oyster shell scale.
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Authors
Thomas deHaas

Bees love the SON!

Seven-son Flower draws hundreds of bees. In the fall we think of pollinators as mostly flowers and perennials. We can forget that trees are some of our most important pollinators. And one of the best in the fall is Seven-son Flower (Heptacodium miconioides)
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Authors
Thomas deHaas

The Rise of Lazarus Lizards

So-called Lazarus Lizards were a topic in both a diagnostic walk-about and a meeting I was involved with last week. The lizard's common name is influenced by where you stand, literally. If you're an American herpetologist, you would call them European Wall Lizards. If you live in Europe, they are Common Wall Lizards. If you're a native Cincinnatian, you would likely call them Lazarus Lizards.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Last Hurrah for Catalpa Hornworms

Participants in the Greater Cincinnati BYGLive! Diagnostic Walk-About held this past Monday in the Boone County Arboretum (Union, KY) viewed second-generation Catalpa Hornworms (Ceratomia catalpae) enjoying a last hurrah before pupating this season. Their discovery led to a discussion on host preference, parasitoids, and a virus spun out of a wasp's genome
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Venomous Caterpillars

Participants in last week's Ohio Plant Diagnostic Workshop looked at but didn't touch, the Smaller Parasa (Parasa chloris). They kept their distance because the deceptively named caterpillar packs a venomous punch that's far from small. As with many creatures in Nature (e.g. crocodilians, mamba snakes, grizzly bears, etc.); these caterpillars should not be handled.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Say Hello to My Little Friends

Participants at last week's Ohio Plant Diagnostic Workshop in Secrest Arboretum (OSU OARDC) viewed the round, pointed galls produced by the Oak Rough Bulletgall Wasp on its namesake host. They also observed – at a distance – the buzzing security detail protecting the immature gall wasps developing within the galls.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Redheads Roll

This is the third BYGL Alert! this season that focuses on Fall Webworm (Hyphantria cunea). This Alert is in response to the numerous e-mail reports I've received of spectacularly large silk nests occurring in southwest Ohio. They are most likely the work of the red-headed fall webworm biotype.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Check Trees for ALB

August is the height of summer, and it is also the best time to spot the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) as it starts to emerge from trees. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is asking the public to take five minutes to step outside and report any signs of this invasive pest. Checking trees for the beetle will help residents protect their own trees and better direct USDA’s efforts to eradicate this beetle from the United States.
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Authors
Amy Stone

The Bagworm Season is in the Bag

The vast majority of Common Bagworm caterpillars in southwest Ohio have initiated their annual "tie-off" in preparation for pupation. Bags are tightly closed and tied with silk to a twig or other anchorage point. Likewise, male bagworms in the northwest part of the state have tied-off; however, some female caterpillars are continuing to feed.
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Authors
Joe Boggs
Curtis E. Young

Sustainable Landscape Workshop: September 3

Come one and all to the Sustainable Landscaping Workshop on September 3 at the Secrest Arboretum of the Ohio State University Wooster campus. Plant selection and matching to the site is the beginning and the key to landscaping success, followed by proper installation and maintenance. Come for a day of interaction, walking and talking.
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Authors
Jim Chatfield
Ann Chanon

Humboldt Sestercentennial

Alexander von Humboldt is one of the most important influencers of the Modern Age, yet we know so little of him; he taught us to embrace and understand our part in Nature, not to fear or conquer Nature. This September 13-14 we will celebrate the 250th Anniversary of his birth. Come one, come all to Secrest Arboretum in Wooster, Ohio for the festivities.
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Authors
Jim Chatfield

Remontant Recurrence Again

Plant blooms are the typical focus as we progress through a growing season, but people become panicky when plants don’t perform how they normally do.  It’s the time of year that concerned citizens call in wondering whether or not their magnolias or rhododendrons are signaling they are going to die.  When asked why they think that the plants are going to die, the response is always the same, “because they are blooming again and they already bloomed this year!”

 

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Authors
Erik Draper

Unholy Sacred Lotus

There are only two species of lotus worldwide: the American Lotus (Nelumbo lutea) and the Sacred Lotus (N. nucifera) which is also called the Indian, Asian, or pink lotus. Both lotus species once belonged to the water-lily family, Nymphaeaceae, in the plant order Nymphaeales.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Oh, What a Tangled Web …

I've long held that this is the time of the year when the adults of several common web-spinning spiders in Ohio reach their maximum population densities. I can't cite any data to support this belief. It's based entirely on observing their gossamer creations; sometimes annoyingly up-close while hiking forest trials.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Be Alert to Elongate Hemlock Scale

Participants at yesterday's Greater Cincinnati BYGLive! Diagnostic Walk-About observed Elongate Hemlock Scale (EHS) on its namesake host. This non-native armored scale has a wide conifer host range beyond hemlocks. It may be found on firs, Douglas-fir, spruces, cedars, and occasionally pines and yews. I first came across EHS in southwest Ohio in 2010 infesting a Cilician fir in a high-profile landscape.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Red "Lipstick" Rust on Crabapples

As I was strolling through the crabapple fields in Wooster at Secrest Arboretum, I began to notice that something was significantly different than the last time that I had evaluated the trees.  Since I was evaluating the trees for apple scab, it suddenly struck me that I was also looking at a lot of polka-dot covered trees!  What in the world was going on?  As I looked closer at the foliage, the thing that stood out the most were the number of yellow-orange dots.

 

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Authors
Erik Draper

Vultures

I've had a long fascination with Turkey Vultures (Cathartes aura) starting when I was a kid in West Virginia. I liked to lay on the ground observing these avian gliders catching thermal updrafts to stay aloft for hours without flapping their wings. This stopped when one of my uncles observed that I looked dead.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Bladdernut Slug Sawfly Conundrum

I've observed sawfly larvae skeletonizing leaves on the same American bladdernut trees southwest Ohio in 2015, 2017, and again late last week. I've concluded they must cause little harm to the overall health of their bladdernut host because the trees continue to flourish despite providing some great photo ops of sawfly damage over the years!
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Sedum Flea Beetle Conundrum

We teach the importance of identifying a pest in order to develop an effective pest management plan. An accurate ID leads to learning about the pest's lifestyle including host range and numbers of generations per season. Occasionally, a significant insect pest somehow continues to fly below the radar of insect taxonomists.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Pavement Ants Have Stingers?

I received a phone call last Friday from a homeowner in Reynoldsburg, OH, who reported that his neighbor had been stung by a horde of aggressive ants. He called because he had seen a BYGL Alert posted last year on Asian Needle Ants in southwest Ohio.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Oriental Lilies Overwhelm Our Senses

As Oriental lilies are about halfway through their “bloombastic tour”, simply walking near them causes one to be stunned visually and in the olfactories too!  After drawing in the noticeable, spicy scent wafting all around and through the air nearby the plants, it gives the feeling that breathing the regular, old normal air seem stale!  That was just one of the differences between Asiatic and Oriental lilies, which I alluded to in an earlier BYGL article this year.

 

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Authors
Erik Draper

Bagworms Reveal Themselves!

This is the time of the year when Common Bagworms come into clear focus owing to their size and noticeable damage. Overwintered eggs hatched in southwest Ohio in early June (see "Be Alert to Bagworms!" posted on June 6). However, it's amazing how well these native moth caterpillars crawl below our radar until their burgeoning appetites finally gives them away.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Be Alert to Boxwood Blight

Boxwood Blight was recently confirmed in a private landscape in Greater Cincinnati by The Ohio State University's C. Wayne Ellett Plant and Pest Diagnostic Clinic (PPDC). The disease causes a severe and usually rapid decline of susceptible boxwoods. Heavy defoliation and branch dieback can occur in a single season killing small plants.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Intriguing Little Barklice

This week I received two emails from clients about clusters of little insects all over their trees. After closely examining the pictures and sharing them with my Horticulture co-workers they confirmed that they were in fact Barklice.
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Authors
Carri Jagger

The Problem with Monarchical Rule

This is the time of the year when the menagerie of insects that feed on members of the dogbane family, including common milkweed, seem to arrive en masse to the consternation of monarchists. Some well-meaning gardeners aim to reserve milkweeds exclusively for the pleasure of monarchs. What about other native insects that feed on milkweeds; let them eat cake?
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Is it a Sawfly Larva or a Caterpillar?

Whenever I hear that the naturally occurring biological insecticide Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki (Btk) is not killing caterpillars, the first thing I try to find out is whether or not the "caterpillars" are actually caterpillars. Btk products (e.g. Dipel, Thuricide, etc.) only kill caterpillars, they do not kill sawfly larvae.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Be Alert for Dogwood Sawfly

The common name of "Dogwood Sawfly" was officially assigned years ago when it was believed there was only one species, Macremphytus tarsatus. However, taxonomists later found there are actually three species of sawflies in the genus Macremphytus that feed on dogwood leaves in the eastern U.S. including Ohio: M. testaceus; M. semicornis; and M. tarsatus.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Gypsy Moth Adults Take Flight

The caterpillar feeding frenzy has ended for the year and adult activity is being observed in NW Ohio. The male moths have taken flight in their zig-zag pattern in hopes of finding a mate. The female moths are white and a bit larger in size, and typically don't move far distances from the pupal casing that they emerged from. She gives off a pheromone to alert close by males of her location. After a visit from the male moth, she will begin laying eggs. The mass of eggs laid now, will remain in that stage until the following spring. 
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Authors
Amy Stone

Perspectives on Sudden Oak Death (SOD)

The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) has announced in an official press release a confirmed interception of the plant disease-causing pathogen Phytophthora ramorum in Ohio. This water mold organism causes ramorum blight on over 100 host plants, including rhododendron and lilac, and sudden oak death (SOD) in coastal areas of California and Oregon.
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Authors
Jim Chatfield
Joe Boggs

Walnut Petiole Gall

While taking pictures of Walnut Caterpillars, I noticed that the sometimes caterpillar-like Walnut Petiole Galls produced by an eriophyid mite are reaching their maximum size and becoming very evident on their namesake host. The galls are specific to black walnut and may occur on the petiole, rachis, and petiolules of the compound leaf.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Walnut Cats on the Prowl

Walnut caterpillars are producing noticeable defoliation in southwest Ohio. The moth caterpillars feed in groups, or "colonies," of 10-30 individuals throughout their development which is why their defoliation is often focused on a single branch or a group of adjoining branches. However, it's also why multiple colonies can quickly defoliate small trees.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

An American Tail: the Lotus and its Caterpillar

If you're in Greater Cincinnati and have the chance visit the beautiful Glenwood Gardens [Great Parks of Hamilton County], grab a map at the main office and ask how to hike to the "Lotus Pond." It's a bit of a hike, but do what I did and wait until the afternoon temperature climbs above 90 F. and the humidity allows you to wear the air. Who needs a sauna?
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Asiatic Lilies Blooming Like Crazy in NE Ohio

As I was driving around, I kept seeing out of the corner of my eyes some brilliant flashes of color in various landscapes.  I kept wondering what I was seeing so I had to stop and identify what was creating those brilliant flashes.  I was pleasantly surprised to discover that the intense colors were plantings of Asiatic lilies.  The colors were so vivid and so diverse that it was almost impossible to walk by them and not notice them!

 

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Authors
Erik Draper

Boxwood Leafminer 2020 Prediction

Boxwood leafminer activity is already very evident on their namesake host in southwest Ohio. This does not bode well for 2020. As the midge fly leaf mining activity further delaminates the upper and lower leaf surfaces, symptoms may become apparent by the end of this season. They will certainly intensify next spring.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Planthoppers Abound

Flatid planthoppers (family Flatidae, order Hemiptera) are relatively small insects with the adults measuring no more than around 1/4" in length. The adults and immatures (nymphs) look nothing alike which can lead to identification issues with connecting one to the other.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Turfgrass Times, 06.28.2019

Here is your link to the weekly video update (recorded on 06.28.2019) from the OSU Turfgrass Team. Updates are from Dr. David Shetlar, aka The Bug Doc; Dr. David Gardner; Dr. Ed Nangle; Dr. Pamela Sherratt (virtual); Joe Rimelspach; and Michael O'Keeffe this week.
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Authors
Amy Stone

A Most Beautiful Beetle

I post a BYGL Alert each year about Dogbane Beetles because the beetle's light-blending artistry makes it one of the most beautiful beetles found in Ohio. Enjoying these shimmering living gems on their namesake host is the entomology equivalent to "stop and smell the roses."
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Authors
Joe Boggs

First Generation Galls Appearing on Baldcypress

First generation galls produced by the Cypress Twig Gall Midge Fly are nearing maturity and are very apparent on baldcypress in southwest Ohio. The spongy, snow-white galls are most commonly found on baldcypress where heavy galling may occur year-after-year on highly susceptible trees. Galls may also arise to a lesser degree on pond cypress.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Gypsy Moth Caterpillars Killed By Fungus and Virus

Last year was an active year for gypsy moth in Ohio, especially what I was seeing personally in Lucas County (Toledo, Ohio). Earlier this season, the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) treated ten identified blocks in Lucas County. There were also treatments made across the state for both larval control and mating distribution at part of the national program coordinated in Ohio by ODA. Information on the treatments made by ODA, including maps, can be found on their website at: https://agri.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/oda/divisions/plant-health/gypsy-moth-program/gypsy-moth-program  Additionally...
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Authors
Amy Stone

Decapitated Cone Heads

The handiwork of the sunflower headclipping weevil (Haplorhynchites aeneus) is just getting underway this season on purple coneflowers (Echinacea purpurea) in southwest Ohio. The damage includes dangling seed heads and stems that looked like soda straws.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Perennial of the Week - Prickly Pear Cactus

When we think of cactus we often think hot and dry, maybe somewhere like Arizona, but not necessarily the buckeye state. It is exciting to see people's reaction when they learn they can grow a cactus in Ohio and that it will winter over and return year after year. The prickly pear cactus (Opuntia humifusa) performs well in full sun and extremely well drained soils. Plant placement is very important as moist or wet soils can pose significant problems. In a year like we have been experiencing, even the most ideal spots could be a little troublesome in 2019 with all of the rain we have been...
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Authors
Amy Stone

ODNR Celebrates 40th Anniversary of Urban Forestry Assistance in Ohio

On Friday, June 21, 2019, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR), Division of Forestry (DOF) celebrated the 40th Anniversary of their Urban Forestry Assistance Program at a Forum held at the Ohio Expo Center and State Fairgrounds. ODNR Director Mary Mertz welcomed the audience attending a program developed to celebrate the last 40 years, and look forward to the next 40+ years. 
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Authors
Amy Stone

Turfgrass Times, 06.21.2019

Here is your link to the weekly video update (recorded on 06.21.2019) from the OSU Turfgrass Team. Updates are from Dr. David Shetlar, aka The Bug Doc; Dr. David Gardner; Dr. Ed Nangle; Dr. Pamela Sherratt; Joe Rimelspach; and Dr. Zane Raudenbush.
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Authors
Amy Stone

White-Marked Tussock Moth Caterpillar Outbreaks

Heavy localized populations of white-marked tussock moth caterpillars are being reported in central and western Ohio. Curtis Young (OSU Extension, Van Wert County) showed images during this week's BYGL Zoom Inservice of caterpillars on a variety of hosts including rose and noted he had received reports of hot spots in Allen, Hancock, and Putnam Counties. I received a report from Franklin County of 100% defoliation of a landscape redbud.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Blistered Oak Leaves

Oak leaf blister and oak leaf blister mites produce look-a-like symptoms early in the growing season. Light green to greenish-yellow irregularly-shaped bulging "blisters" rise from the upper leaf surface. An accurate diagnosis requires flipping the leaves over to look at the lower leaf surface.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Poison Hemlock and Wild Parsnip are going to Seed in Southern Ohio

Poison hemlock and wild parsnip are two of our nastiest non-native weeds found in Ohio. Poison hemlock can kill you while wild parsnip may make you wish you were dead. Both are commonly found growing together and continuously wet conditions caused both to flourish this growing season. The size of some infestations has been remarkable. Poison hemlock produces white flowers on stalks that create a more rounded look; perhaps a bit more like an umbrella.  Wild parsnip has intense yellow flowers with the stalks producing a more flat-topped appearance.
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Authors
Joe Boggs
Erik Draper

Crabs, Scab and then So Sad... Drab!

On the BYGL conference call, I shared that I am amazed at how the foliage of the greatest landscape small tree, the breathtaking crabapple, has remained relatively clean here in NE Ohio.  I was expecting with all of the rain this year, that we would quickly see what we Crabarians affectionately term “year of the scab dog”.  This “scab dog” effect is due to the fungal pathogen (Venturia inaequalis) causing extensive apple scab lesions on susceptible crabapple tree leaves.  Given our perfect environmental conditions for this fungal disease, I expected it to quickly...

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Authors
Erik Draper
Joe Boggs
The Natural...and Unnatural History of Trees chatfield.1@osu.edu Thu, 06/20/2019 - 17:38
We will be exploring the old and new Secrest Arboreta at a special tree program on July 9. Join us as we look at constructed treescapes and wilder regions. Come prepared to walk!
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Authors
Jim Chatfield

Dogwoods Are Dazzling

While on our BYGL conference call, I shared the glorious status of Kousa dogwoods (Cornus kousa var. chinensis) right now in NE Ohio.  Only one word can describe them, “OUTSTANDING”!!  Then Joe Boggs from the southern reaches of the state, asked me to repeat what I said about the Kousa’s here.  I told him that they were just reaching their full glory and were unbelievable due to the cooler weather and moisture.

 

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Authors
Erik Draper

Periodical Cicada: Rounds 1 and 2

Brood VIII (Eight) of the 17-year periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) have made their presence known in parts of northeastern Ohio, western Pennsylvania, and the northern panhandle of West Virginia. As with past brood emergences, the overall geographical distribution is spotty; however, there are localized pockets with heavy cicada activity.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Magnolia Scale is Puffing-Up and Dripping Honeydew

Magnolia scale females are "puffing-up" and dripping copious quantities of honeydew in southwest Ohio. This native scale has a strong affinity for non-native magnolias and associated hybrids. Common hosts include star magnolia, lily magnolia, and saucer magnolia. Native magnolias are more resistant perhaps because of natural defenses that developed through a shared evolutionary history with the scale.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Yucca Plant Bug

I've long admired yucca (Yucca spp., family Asparagaceae) but realize many do not share my enthusiasm for these agave cousins. Indeed, searching the web using "yucca" as the keyword yields almost as many websites offering advice on how to kill it as how to grow it.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Herbaceous Plant School at Secrest: June 27

An Herbaceous Perennials and Annuals School ill be held at Secrest Arboretum on Thursday, June 27, featuring the stylings of Pam Bennett, OSU State Master Gardener Coordinator and Trial Gardens Guru, Matt Shultzman, the man behind Secrest's herbaceous plantings and more teachers and learned. Join us for good food, good walks and displays, and a whole lotta learnin'.
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Authors
Jim Chatfield
Pam Bennett

Woody of the Week - Kousa Dogwood

The kousa dogwood (Cornus florida) is an eye catcher. This 15 - 30 foot tall tree flowers a little later in the season compared to the native flowering dogwood (Cornus florida). The flowers, including the bracts which some people call erroneously call petals, appear above the tree's foliage. I have observed the bracts holding on for weeks. The fruit will develop as the season progresses and I have observed the squirrels having a feast as they ripen. 
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Authors
Amy Stone

Oddball Fern-Balls

I received an e-mail message a couple of weeks ago with images showing the tips of ostrich fern (Matteuccia struthiopteris) fronds rolled into tight ball-like structures. One of the images showed a "fern-ball" opened to reveal a translucent caterpillar.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Turfgrass Times, 06.07.2019

Here is your link to the weekly video update from the OSU Turfgrass Team. Updates are from Dr. David Shetlar, aka The Bug Doc; Dr. David Gardner; Dr. Ed Nangle; Dr. Pamela Sherratt; Joe Rimelspach; Dr. Karl Dannenberger; and Dr. Zane Raudenbush.
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Authors
Amy Stone
Basswood Lace Bug on Silver Linden: Harbingers of the Lace Bug Season boggs.47@osu.edu Thu, 06/06/2019 - 15:07
I've long admired silver linden with its dark green leaves accentuated by silver undersides. This tough tree is able to handle many of the urban slings and arrows that send less hardy trees to wood chippers. However, this eastern European native seems to be having a growing challenge with our native basswood lace bugs.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Scuzzy Looking Oaks

Holes and blotch-type leafmines produced by the oak shothole leafminer coupled with necrotic tissue caused by oak anthracnose are combining to make some oaks in southwest Ohio look pretty scuzzy. The bad news is nothing can be done now to reverse the damage. The good news is that neither of these occasional springtime afflictions has a history of causing significant harm to the overall health of their oak hosts.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Watch Out Four-Line Plant Bug - She Means Business (For Real This Time!)

In 2018, around this same time period, I wrote a BYGL Alert about the damage in my garden caused by the four-lined plant bug (Poecilocapus lineatus). I was a bit upset because of the amount of damage to a wide variety of plants. I SAID I was going to take action but of course, I never got around to it. Well, that's about to change this year!
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Authors
Pam Bennett

Snipe Hunting

Participants in today's Greater Cincinnati BYGLive! Diagnostic Walk-About had a successful snipe hunt at the Cincinnati Nature Center. I'm not talking about the mythical forest creature that's only ever been seen by camp counselors or older siblings.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Look Before You Sit on Concrete

We're seeing large numbers of tiny, fast-moving bright red mites scurrying around on sunny surfaces such as on picnic tables, patios, sidewalks, concrete retaining walls, and on the outside walls of homes and buildings in southern Ohio. These nuisance mites belong to the genus Balaustium (family Erythraeidae) and are sometimes called "concrete mites" owing to locations where they tend to congregate.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Rise of Fall Webworms

First-generation nests of the deceptively named fall webworm (Hyphantria cunea) are now becoming evident in Ohio. This native moth has two generations per season in Ohio with the first-generation appearing once the overwintered eggs hatch.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Bedraggled Elms: Galling Conditions

The leaves of native elms can look a bit bedraggled at this time of the year owing to rise of pouch-like elm sack galls and the descriptively named elm cockscomb galls. Fortunately, neither of these aphid galls produce significant injury to the overall health of their elm tree host. Unfortunately, these odd looking plant structures can spoil the aesthetics of their deep green elm leaf platforms.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Bedraggled Elms: Elm Leafminer Sawfly

The leaves of native elms, non-natives, and hybrids can look a bit bedraggled at this time of the year owing to the leafmining activity of the elm leafminer sawfly. Fortunately, leafmining by the sawfly larvae has drawn to a close for the season, so the damage you see now will be the most damage that you'll see this season. Unfortunately, sawfly development has moved past effective control options meaning that you'll have to live with the current damage.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Bedraggled Elms: the Weevil

The leaves of native elms, non-natives, and hybrids can look a bit bedraggled at this time of the year owing to the adult pit feeding activity and larval leafmining activity of the elm flea weevil. Fortunately, leafmining by the weevil has drawn to a close, so the damage you see now will be the most damage that you'll see this season. Unfortunately, round two of the adult weevil damage is already underway.
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Authors
Joe Boggs
Curtis E. Young

Calico Scale Egg Hatch

Calico scale eggs located beneath helmet-shaped females are beginning to hatch in southwest Ohio. This life cycle event happens quickly; the small number of 1st instar nymphs that I spotted yesterday will soon become a horde. Unlike armored scales, all nymphal stages of this soft scale are mobile, so nymphs can be called "crawlers" throughout their development.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Galls on Azaleas

Early today, a NW Ohio resident called the Extension Office concerned about the leaves on her azaleas. She described the leaves as beginning to appear contorted and that there were growths that were thickening. The problem seemed to be getting worse and covering more of the leaves. The homeowner had several plants near the house's foundation and another plant along a sidewalk. All were exhibiting similar signs and symptoms, but some were more infected than others. 
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Authors
Amy Stone

What are Your Plant Pest, Disease, and Weed Management Challenges?

The Inter-regional Research Project #4 (IR-4 Project) conducts biennial surveys to learn the pest, disease, and weed management challenges faced by the Green Industry. The survey results are used to guide research and to facilitate the registrations of conventional chemical pesticides as well as biopesticides.
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Joe Boggs

Picking Up Pawpaws.. Blooming

As I was in the throes of cutting and baling my overgrown lawn last week in Northeast Ohio, I was pleasantly surprised to see a profuse flower display on my Pawpaw (Asmina triloba) trees!  I can’t recall ever seeing so many buds and blooms on the tree, especially the numbers which were noted this season.  Now some may opine that the green, brown fuzz covered bud scales are the reason most people ignore and consequently, miss the real floral display, because the buds seem so uninspiring. 

 

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Authors
Erik Draper

The Wrath of Grapes

The bristly, lumpy round galls produced by the grape phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae, family Phylloxeridae) may dominate our perception of galls on grapes. Indeed, these peculiar plant structures are a common feature on the lower leaf surfaces of wild grapes (Vitis spp.) in Ohio.
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Joe Boggs

Dripping Tuliptrees

Liriodendron tulipifera is showing off its tulip-like flame-based flowers in southwest Ohio. This has long been one of my favorite trees even though I'm never quite sure what to call it or exactly how to spell it. I'm not alone.
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Joe Boggs

Annual Maple Leaf-Drop

Finding large numbers of green leaves littering the ground beneath maple trees wouldn't be a surprise given the recent high winds and heavy rains over much of Ohio. However, you should take a second look at this time of the year for short petioles on the shed leaves and broken petioles remaining attached to the tree. Both are tell-tale symptoms of the maple petiole borer.
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Joe Boggs

Be Alert for "Mud Chimneys"

The rise of "mud chimneys" produced by burrowing crayfish has long been one of my favorite harbingers of spring. These unusual mud structures are often described as looking like chimneys because of their cylindrical shape and large, round hole in the center. No other animal produces such unique mud structures in Ohio.
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Joe Boggs
Wilted, Rolled, and Mined Buckeye Leaves boggs.47@osu.edu Mon, 05/20/2019 - 11:18
Buckeye and horsechestnut tree canopies tend to be remarkably free of insect pest damage except for the depredations of some general defoliators. However, if you're cruising Ohio woodlands this spring, you may run across three types of leaf damage. None of the damage appears to cause serious harm to overall tree health, but the symptoms can be obvious.
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Joe Boggs
Rhododendrons – Azaleas; Reality Art! dehaas.2 Mon, 05/20/2019 - 08:08
Rhododendrons and Azaleas are blooming in Northeast Ohio. They come in almost all the colors of the rainbow! Enjoy the art show!
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Thomas deHaas
Yellow Fields Forever boggs.47@osu.edu Sat, 05/18/2019 - 10:34
The dichotomous nature of Cressleaf Groundsel (a.k.a. Butterweed) tests the tolerance of lovers of native wildflowers. On one hand, a sea of golden-yellow flowers carpeting farm fields in Ohio provides welcome relief from highway monotony. On the other hand, upright 2 – 3' tall plants dominating Ohio landscapes presents a weed management challenge.
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Joe Boggs

Fiery Eye-Candy

I came across one of the most striking beetles today that you'll ever find in Ohio. The fittingly named Fiery Searcher Caterpillar Hunter (Calosoma scrutator) are best described as beauty with a bite.
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Joe Boggs
The European Paper Wasp Conundrum boggs.47@osu.edu Fri, 05/17/2019 - 13:49
European paper wasps have presented a conundrum over the past several years in Ohio. The literature notes these wasps were first found in North America in the 1970s near Boston, MA. They are now found throughout much of the U.S. and parts of Canada. However, after becoming the dominant paper wasp in Ohio, they've all but disappeared in recent years.
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Authors
Joe Boggs
Curtis E. Young
Dave Shetlar
Tree of the Week - Carolina Silverbell stone.91@osu.edu Fri, 05/17/2019 - 12:49
Carolina silverbell in bloom is a sight to behold. Its delicate white bell-shaped flowers hang down from 1/2 to 1 inch stalks in 2 to 5 flower clusters.
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Amy Stone

Bladdergall Enlightenment

My introduction to the wonderful world of plant galls began with observing vibrant red, wart-like galls, known as "bladdergalls," adorning the upper leaf surfaces of a silver maple tree. The galls consist entirely of plant tissue and are produced under the plant gene-manipulating direction of the Maple Bladdergall Mite (family Eriophyidae). I'm probably not alone with this being the first gall ever encountered.
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Joe Boggs

Sycamore and Ash Anthracnose

Symptoms of two host-specific fungal anthracnose diseases are becoming apparent in southwest Ohio.  Ash anthracnose was announced by the appearance of irregularly shaped reddish-brown, blotchy spots along the edges of the leaflets.  The leaf necrosis often causes the leaflets to curl and severe infections may lead to defoliation.
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Joe Boggs
Be Alert to Wild Parsnip! boggs.47@osu.edu Wed, 05/15/2019 - 13:57
Second-year wild parsnip plants are producing deeply grooved flower stalks topped by characteristic bright yellow blooms in southern Ohio. Landscape managers and gardeners should exercise extreme caution around this non-native invasive biennial plant.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Blue Week in Northwest Ohio

Each May, the partners of the Green Ribbon Initiative assemble a wide array of programs to encourage people to get out into the amazing region in northwest Ohio and southeast Michigan. This globally unique region is home to a wide variety of plants and animals such as wild blue lupine, Karner blue butterflies, blue spotted salamanders, big and little bluestem, blueberries, bluebirds, blue racers and much, much more.  We love our blues! 
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Authors
Amy Stone

Dogs Gone Wild!

Dogwoods are in full bloom in Northeast Ohio. They are beautiful: Whites, Pinks and Pale Pink. However, are you sure that is what you want to install?
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Authors
Thomas deHaas

Woody Phomopsis Galls

Dave Leonard (Consulting Arborist, Dave Leonard Tree Services, Lexington, KY) brought a fascinating gall sample to the Greater Cincinnati Diagnostic Walk-About last week. The woody galls were on hickory (Carya sp.) and sparked an informative diagnostic discussion among the participants.
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Authors
Joe Boggs
Jim Chatfield

Interesting Oak Leaf Insect Galls

I came across a number of interesting oak leaf insect galls during hikes this week in several local parks. Oaks are prime gall-fodder providing support for over 800 different types of galls. It's why I find oaks so interesting. Three-quarters of the gall-makers belong to two families: the wasp family Cynipidae; and the "gall midge" family Cecidomyiidae (cecido means "gall").
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Joe Boggs
The Inside Story on Obnoxious Nostoc boggs.47@osu.edu Fri, 05/10/2019 - 12:22
I received an e-mail message earlier this week with images showing colonies of a cyanobacterium, Nostoc commune, growing in openings created by turfgrass succumbing to some other issue. The sender asked me to identify the "black stuff" they believed was killing their lawn.
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Joe Boggs

Boxwood Leafminer Flies Fly

Participants in this week's Greater Cincinnati BYGLive! Diagnostic Walk-About were treated to an enormous swarm of boxwood leafminer adult flies flitting around their namesake host. The flies are a type of wood midge and belong to the same family (Cecidomyiidae) as gall midges.
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Joe Boggs

Biggest Week in American Birding

What do an estimated 90,000 people from 50 states, 52 countries and 6 continents do each spring? Every year, birders from across the world flock to NW Ohio to see the migrating birds. The Biggest Week in American Birding is underway for the 10th consecutive year. The week officially runs from May 3 - 12 this year.
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Authors
Amy Stone

How Plants Mate: Upcoming Program

How Plants Mate is not just for botanists. Understanding the nuances and variability of the different modes is a key horticultural skill, whether plants are dioecious (male and female flowers on separate plants) or the vagaries of grafting and making new plants through propagation, How Plants Mate is central knowledge.
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Authors
Jim Chatfield

Land of the Bizarre: Tree Moats and Volcano Mulch

Sometimes we run across bizarre things in Ohio landscapes that simply defy explanation. Such was the case yesterday when I came across "tree moats" (sometimes called "mulch moats") in a park near my home in the southwest part of the state. I've encountered this bizarre practice before and fail to fathom the logic behind this ludicrous practice.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Annual of the Week - Lantana

If you are looking for an annual that flowers all summer long, attracts pollinators and is low maintenance Lantana is your plant. Lantana is native to the tropical Americas and Africa and is in the Verbenaceae Family.  In Ohio, it is grown as a garden annual and is valued for its long season of reliable blooms.
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Julie Crook

SADD Garden brings Happiness!

Students at Perry High School in the group, Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD) installed the Good Decision Garden at the entrance of the school. Students walk past the planting as they arrive and leave school each day, enjoying the flowering display all spring.
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Authors
Thomas deHaas

Be Alert for Pine Needle Scale Crawlers

Pine Needle Scale was once a common and troubling pest back when Mugo pines rivaled yews and junipers as one of the most common landscape plants in Ohio and Scotch pine was THE Christmas tree grown in our plantations. However, that's changed over the years. As mugos and Scotch have become less common in our landscapes and Christmas tree plantations, so has the occurrence of pine needle scale.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Helicopters Fly over Lake County in May!

What are those Helicopters spraying? Helicopters were flying over Perry, Ohio on May 25, 2018 last year spraying tree lines and nursery stock. What were they spraying? Why from a helicopter? Lake County is one of 51 counties in Ohio that fall under the European Gypsy Moth Quarantine. Currently 51 counties in Ohio are regulated under the Gypsy Moth quarantine. One main requirement for the compliance agreement is that nurseries must apply a USDA-approved insecticide to the entire growing area in mid to late May.
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Authors
Thomas deHaas

Rusts Arise!

Colorful displays of three types of rust fungi are appearing on junipers in Ohio. The fungi belong to the genus Gymnosporangium and they complete part of their life-cycle on members of the plant genus Juniperus and the other part of their life-cycle on members of the family Rosaceae. In biological terms, this type of life-cycle is known as "heteroecious."
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Joe Boggs

Red Bark on Sycamore and London Planetrees

Last Wednesday, Jerry Frankenhoff (Urban Forester, Great Parks of Hamilton County) sent an e-mail message asking about red staining on the bark of sycamore trees. He wrote that he'd never seen anything like this before. I was shocked when I looked at his attached image. Likewise, I had never before seen the unusual reddening symptoms on sycamore or any other tree.
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Joe Boggs

Imperial Fritillary

The imperial fritillary or crown imperial (Fritillary imperialis) is blooming in gardens in northwest Ohio now. The plant comes in various shades of yellows, oranges and reds. The pendulous flowers are about 2" long and are found clustered at the terminal end of stout and leafless stem that towers above the leaves below. Above the flowers are a sheaf of smaller leaves that form a tuft of green as shown in the photo below.
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Amy Stone

Leaking Trees

From my perspective, one of the most rewarding things about plant problem diagnostics is not just about achieving a successful diagnosis; it's what we learn from the instructive twists and turns along the way. Arthur Ashe captured it nicely, "Success is a journey, not a destination. The doing is often more important than the outcome."
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Joe Boggs

What's Your GDD?

Has anyone every asked you, "what's your GDD?" While many of you may have responded "yes," or may have even thought, "I ask others all the time"; I know there are some that probably yelled out their current GDD when simply reading the title of this alert. If you are still wondering what the heck is GDD - keep on reading, you won't be disappointed and will hopefully click on the link below to find out your GDD to date. 

  

GDD stands for growing degree days. GDD are a measurement of the growth and development of plants and insects during the...

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Amy Stone

Be Alert for Boxwood Leafminer

Boxwoods with yellow to brown leaves are common this spring in a number of locations in Ohio. Some of the leaf browning is due to winter injury; some was caused by salt damage. However, a close examination may also reveal the telltale blister-like leaf symptoms caused by the boxwood leafminer.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

How To Hire An Arborist

Ohio State University Extension's Home Yard and Garden FactSheet HYG-1032 has been update and is available online. The OSU FactSheet includes tips for selecting an arborist and resources available to help find an arborist.  
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Amy Stone

Green Tigers Prowling Forest Trails

I spotted one of my favorite insect predators darting about on a forest trail yesterday: six-spotted tiger beetles. Their common name is well justified as these tiny "tigers" hunt, kill, and eat other insects. They are equipped with huge eyes for excellent eyesight, long legs for agile speed, and huge mandibles for grabbing prey.
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Joe Boggs

Soil Mining Bees on the Wing

Dalton Westerbeck with Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum e-mailed me Wednesday to report that soil "mining bees" are waking from their winter naps. Dalton is an ISA Certified Arborist and an Ohio State Beekeepers Association, Master Beekeeper. He is locating and marking all of the mining bee "colonies" in the Grove so he can document their population densities and seasonal development.
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Joe Boggs

Name That Insect . . .

As temperatures warm, people are outside enjoying the almost, spring-like weather. There are still a few waiting for even warmer temperatures to arrive and stick around for more than a day - you know who you are. As everyone migrates outdoors as temperatures rise, the chances of an insect encounter will be pretty high. At the first encounter, many people may have an urge to "eliminate" the six legged species.
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Authors
Amy Stone

Learn More About Ash Hazards

Earlier this month, Joe Boggs authored a BYGL Alert entitled, Ash Breakage: the Hazard Continues (March 19, 2019). To follow-up with this topic, we wanted to alert you to an upcoming webinar from EAB University called Dead Ash Dangers and Considerations for Risk and Removal.
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Authors
Amy Stone

Be Alert to Poison Hemlock

Poison hemlock is a non-native biennial weed that spends its first year as a low-growing basal rosette; the stage that is currently very apparent. During its second year, plants produce erect, towering stalks and multi-branched stems topped with umbrella-like flowers. Mature plants can measure 6-10' tall and are prolific seed producers.
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Joe Boggs

Be Alert for White Pine Weevil

White Pine Weevil females spend the winter out of sight cooling their six heels in the duff beneath their pine or spruce targets. As temperatures warm in the spring, they climb their hosts to feed and lay eggs in the terminals. Sap oozing from small holes in the terminals is a calling card of this weevil.
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Joe Boggs

Ash Breakage: the Hazard Continues

During our BYGL Zoom Inservice today, the group discussed the continual hazard presented by ash trees that have been killed by (EAB, Agrilus planipennis). Participants located throughout Ohio noted that walks in the woods remain a serious risk with dead ash trees breaking or toppling over onto walking trails.
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Joe Boggs

The Girdle you HATE to see!

What is the worst girdle? A girdling root or roots. These seemingly harmless roots will eventually weaken, strangling and in many cases kill the tree. Or, girdling roots will weaken the tree to a point making it susceptible to break off in the wind.
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Thomas deHaas

Lesser Celandine is on the Rise

Lesser Celandine plants are starting to rise in southern Ohio. This non-native is known as a "spring ephemeral" owing to the time of year when the short-lived plants and flowers are present. The majority of this weed's hide-and-seek life-cycle is spent hidden from view as underground tubers.
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Joe Boggs

National Invasive Species Awareness Week, February 25 - March 3, 2019

Today, February 25, 2019 kicks-off National Invasive Species Awareness Week! While meetings, programs, and events are scheduled in Washington DC, we can use the week as a way to raise awareness right here in the buckeye state. Please share this alert with your colleagues, clients, friends and family to help spread the word about invasive species. 
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Amy Stone

Cold Temperatures Blow Into The Buckeye State

I think it is safe to say everyone is watching the weather forecast, specifically the bone-chilling temperatures that are making their way towards Ohio. Temperatures are predicted to be below zero and falling into the double digits beginning this evening (01.29.2019) through Thursday (01.31.2019). Wind chills are expected to be in the negative twenties, and could reach the negative forties depending upon location.
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Amy Stone

Open Comment Period Following New Additions to the OIPC Invasive Plant List

The Ohio Invasive Plant Council (OIPC) recently released information on the assessment of 9 new plant species for inclusion on their list of invasive plants. With this announcement also begins a 6-month public comment period for the new additions to the list.  Comments, suggestions or questions during this period should be directed to Theresa Culley (theresa.culley@uc.edu).  
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Authors
Amy Stone
Joe Boggs

ODA Announces 2019 Gypsy Moth Open Houses

The gypsy moth is a non-native pest that feeds on leaves and needles of over 300 different trees in the buckeye state. The feeding injury occurs in the spring and early summer when populations are present. The early season feeding, when heavy, causes the plants to push new leaves that ultimately are the food-factories for the rest of the year. Healthy deciduous trees can usually recover as long as there isn't repeat defoliation year after year. Evergreens can die in a single season. 
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Amy Stone

Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire...

 

 

A diagnostic sample this week had me thinking about this yuletide carol.  A visitor brought a bowl of chestnuts to the Extension Office this week.  This tree has been producing for many years, but the nuts within never fill out into the round tasty treats associated with the holidays.  What is going on?

 

 

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Ashley Kulhanek

You're a Mean One... Mr. Recluse?

 

It's the holiday season (the holiday season...) and many are digging in attics and basements for decorations and bows, stored sweaters, coats and yes... SNOW boots.  Inevitably, Extension offices receive calls about the unfortunate spider (or stink bug) that was found, dead or alive, while sifting through packages, boxes or bags that haven't seen the light of day for a year.  The question is, "Is it a brown recluse?"

 

 

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Authors
Ashley Kulhanek

An Unusual Insect-Killing Fungus

I received an e-mail message this past Wednesday from Tom Macy (ODNR) concerning efforts to discover locations of the non-native elongate hemlock scale in Ohio and other states. His message included two attached images taken by Bill Laubscher (Pennsylvania Bureau of Forestry) on November 20 that showed both the scale as well as odd looking blackened accretions on hemlock needles.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

An Icy Awakening

The Tri-State region in southwest Ohio experienced an ice storm overnight this past Wednesday. Although the official accumulation of ice due to freezing rain reported at the Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky International Airport was only 0.22", the number of homes and businesses in Greater Cincinnati without power yesterday morning exceeded 200,000. Why such a high impact from only 1/4" of ice?
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Joe Boggs

Strengthen Your Diagnostic Skills Through Learning

I recently heard "snowflakes" are in the forecast. As temperatures drop, it is a great time to get indoors, increase knowledge, network and earn credits. One of those opportunities in December is the OSU Green Industry Short Course held in conjunction with the Ohio Turfgrass Foundation's (OTF) Conference and Tradeshow. It is one registration that covers three days of training broken out into different educational tracks.
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Authors
Amy Stone

Ohio Turfgrass Conference and Tradeshow and OSU Short Course - December 4 - 6, 2018

The season is winding down and now is the time to plan your educational opportunities - learn the latest, earn credits and network with others in the industry. The Ohio Turfgrass Foundation and Tradeshow in cooperation with the Ohio State University Green Industry Short Course will be held on December 4 - 6 at the Columbus Convention Center.
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Amy Stone

New Ohio State App Helps Users Identify, Prevent and Control Bed Bugs

Not sure if the dark speck that crawled across your desk at work was a bed bug? Wondering if the tiny insect you saw on the seat next to you at the movie theater or on the bus was a bed bug? How about that fleck you thought you saw on the corner of the mattress the last time you stayed in a hotel? A researcher at The Ohio State University has created a free new app to help you figure it out.
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Kissing Cousin Bugs

I've received four e-mail messages since late last week from concerned Ohio homeowners who asked about controlling kissing bugs. However, two included images of western conifer seed bugs which is a type of leaffooted bug. One message had images of boxelder bugs and one person included a very nice picture of a wheel bug found on their porch.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

A Society of Unsung Heroes

I did a teaching presentation on Asian longhorned beetle this Tuesday at the Horticulture Inspection Society (HIS), Central Chapter's 48th Annual Conference held in Holland, MI. Other presentations covered international exports, plant taxonomy, hemlock woolly adelgid, spotted lanternfly, to name just a few topics
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Joe Boggs
Why Trees Matter - October 24, 2018 stone.91@osu.edu Tue, 10/09/2018 - 21:51
Join us October 24, 2018 for the annual ‘Why Trees Matter Forum’ at the Miller Pavilion at Secrest Arboretum, Wooster, Ohio. We love trees - do you?  
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Amy Stone
A Spicy Surprise boggs.47@osu.edu Tue, 10/09/2018 - 19:22
I received a container of ground cayenne peppers with a surprise far greater than the capsaicin kick. The product was heavily infested with cigarette beetles. The homeowner noted they hadn't used the product for some time. However, they had noticed small brown beetles buzzing around their home and collecting on their window seals.
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Authors
Joe Boggs
A Most Unusual Grub boggs.47@osu.edu Sat, 10/06/2018 - 12:11
I came across a green June beetle larva (grub) last Thursday slowly slinking across a driveway. This is one of largest and strangest white grubs you'll ever see in Ohio. First, the mature grubs are huge measuring well over 1" in length. They look like white grubs on steroids.
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Authors
Joe Boggs
Bullet Galls and Their Guards boggs.47@osu.edu Sat, 10/06/2018 - 09:39
Oak bullet galls have reached their maximum size for the season and will soon release their developing female wasps. The galls arise from twigs and are produced under the direction of several species of cynipid wasps (family Cynipidae). So, you may find different types of bullet galls depending on the exact gall-making wasp species that directed their creation.
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Joe Boggs
Small but Mighty Fly boggs.47@osu.edu Fri, 10/05/2018 - 15:23
I came across a beautiful little native fly this week while taking pictures of pollinators on common goldenrod. The fly, Trichopoda pennipes, doesn't have a common name, but some web-based resources refer to it as the "feather-legged fly." This is not entirely correct.
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Joe Boggs
What Lies Beneath boggs.47@osu.edu Wed, 10/03/2018 - 15:24
I enjoy making unexpected discoveries with one revelation leading to the next and then the next like pulling apart one of those Russian nesting dolls. My chain of discoveries started with finding "fresh" puffball mushrooms during a walk in a local park. I was thrilled because I had never taken pictures of the early stages of these peculiar looking mushrooms.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Cucumber Beetles Wreaking Havoc - IN THE FLOWER BEDS!

Take note!  Every few years it seems that there are high populations of spotted cucumber beetles that have moved from vegetable gardens into the flower beds.  They love to feed on the supple, tender sweet petals of dahlia, mum, petunia, portulaca, sunflower and many others.  Joe Boggs did a quick check in his area and found them feeding on Jerusalum artichokes.  Joe also noted that this is his "go-to indicator plant" when inspecting for this pest in his area.  They seemed to be working the salvia but not actually feeding on it.  
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Authors
Pam Bennett

Annual of the Week - Popcorn Plant

Scratch and sniff horticulture - there is nothing better. How many remember the stickers that you had when you were younger? The ones that with a scratch of your nail, the smell radiated from the paper. This should have been a sticker to enjoy year round, not just during the growing season! And then of course the plant should be enjoyed during the late spring, summer and into early fall.
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Authors
Amy Stone

Lesson Learned

This week, I had a backyard hobby orchard grower stop in the office. Extension has always been a resource for his father when he was growing, and now the son. While we discussed common pest problems of apples and pear this growing season, the grower also shared a "lesson learned" last winter. 
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Amy Stone

That's gold, Jerry! GOLD!

I'm an unabashed fan of common goldenrod (a.k.a. Canada goldenrod). Its flowers are an important late-season food source for pollinators drawing in a wide range of insects and their yellowish to gold-tone makes a nice photo backdrop. In fact, this native perennial offers a pollinator photo op paradise.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Ohio Pollinator Habitat Initiative - Annual Milkweed Pod Collection 

The Ohio Pollinator Habitat Initiative (OPHI) is encouraging all Ohioans who have grown common milkweed this season to harvest seed pods and take them to a participating Soil and Water Conservation Office. The Annual Milkweed Pollination Collection is in its third year in Ohio. In 2015, 7 counties piloted the milkweed seed pod collection. The project has grown and it is estimated that over 22 million seeds have been collected by volunteers across the buckeye state over the 3 years.  
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Authors
Amy Stone

The Impatient Gardener

Jewelweeds or touch-me-nots are common in eastern woodlands, as two species, the yellow Impatiens pallida and the orange Impatiens capensis. There are more jewelweeds than meet the eye, however. Read on.
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Authors
Jim Chatfield
Jason Veil

Blue-Winged Wasps Cruising Lawns

Blue-winged wasps are continuing to make low-level flights over lawns in southwest Ohio. As their common name implies, the wasps have dark blue wings. Their legs and thorax are also dark blue. However, their most distinguishing features are two light-yellow spots at the top of their orange-tipped abdomens.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

A Non-Native, Native Lizard

If you're ever visiting Cincinnati during the dog days of summer, keep your eyes peeled for a fascinating non-native lizard scurrying over rock walls, darting across sidewalks, and lurking in landscaping. These lizards are intriguing because the story of how they got to Cincinnati and their ascent to equal treatment amongst native reptiles is almost unprecedented for reptiles in Ohio.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Redbud Leaffolder Damage

Participants at last week's Greater Cincinnati Diagnostic Walk-About were thrilled to view the unusual leaf symptoms caused by the Redbud Leaffolder on its namesake host. Or, maybe it was just me who was thrilled. Most of the leaf damage this season is produced by the current 3rd generation caterpillars.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) Cooperative Eradication Program in Ohio Scores Another "Win"

Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) is potentially the most devastating non-native pest to have ever arrived in North America. The beetle kills trees belonging to 12 genera in 9 plant families. This includes all native maples, a preferred host. Successful eradication is essential to avoiding a catastrophic loss of trees on a scale never before seen in the U.S.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Monarch Migration

The annual migration of monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippusis) has begun. It has to be an amazing adventure if you are the butterfly, or spectacular site if you are a person able to observe the migration in progress.
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Authors
Amy Stone

Beech Blight Aphids Shake Their Booty

I believe no other insect upstages Beech Bligh Aphids in entertainment value. During a visit to a Lake County, OH, park last Thursday, Jim Chatfield and I came across a cluster of these engaging aphids shaking their woolly derrieres in what appeared to be a synchronous samba. All we needed was "(Shake, Shake, Shake) Shake Your Booty" by KC and the Sunshine Band blaring in the background to complete the effect.
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Authors
Joe Boggs
Jim Chatfield

Thousand Cankers Disease (TCD) Update – Don't Rush to Cut Walnut Trees!

The long-term outlook for eastern black walnuts seemed dire when the Thousand Cankers Disease (TCD) complex was confirmed in Butler County, OH, in 2013. Thankfully, TCD has not followed the devastating trajectory we originally feared. It is not rolling through our native black walnuts à la emerald ash borer on native ash. The two situations are like apples-to-oranges.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

No Asian Hornets in the U.S.

When you read or hear about "Asian hornets," you need to keep two things in mind. First, the "Asian" moniker has been commonly applied to at least three hornet species native to various Asian regions. The second thing to remember is that none of these hornets have been found living in the U.S.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Invasive Plant Species Alert - Japanese Stiltgrass

Japanese stiltgrass was not on my radar until a recent visit to a local park. It had piqued my interest because of the plants lushness beneath a full canopy of trees. My first thought was, what is this grass that could be a recommendation for shady sights? My excitement quickly waned because our hosts explained that the annual grass unfortunately, is an invasive species.
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Authors
Cindy Meyer
Broom of the Week; 'Cody's Feathers' Baldcypress chatfield.1@osu.edu Mon, 08/27/2018 - 10:35
Witch's Brooms of Conifers result in many dwarf or at least smaller than usual forms. 'Cody's Feathers' baldcypress is one example, a more rounded, dense, shorter form of baldcypress than the usual species exhibits.
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Authors
Jim Chatfield
Jason Veil
Eastern Filbert Blight on Hazelnut stone.91@osu.edu Fri, 08/24/2018 - 22:38
Eastern filbert blight is a disease of filbert and hazelnut trees (Corylus spp.). It is caused by a native fungus. In a natural setting, filbert blight causes a relatively minor disease on native American hazelnut shrubs (Corylus americana) causing small cankers on the stems and branches. However, the disease is lethal to introduced and commercially important European hazelnut (Corylus avellana) in orchards.
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Amy Stone

Annual of the Week - Cotton

This interesting annual caught my attention earlier in the season, and it just kept getting better and better.  As the cotton plant grows, it can be quite the conversation piece. It can be planted in the ground or in containers. It prefers poor and dry soil conditions. The planting at Toledo Botanical Garden (TBG) is a mass planting in the Artist Village where the cotton will be harvested and utilized by local artists. The plants are approximately 4 feet tall.
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Amy Stone

Bagworms are Wrapping Up

Most of the Common Bagworms I looked at yesterday in southern Ohio and central Indiana had initiated their annual "tie-off" in preparation for pupation. Bags are tightly closed and tied with silk to a twig or other anchorage point. This means the damage caused by these caterpillars wrapped in silk bags festooned with host plant debris is drawing to a close.
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Joe Boggs

The Best Herbaceous Plants for My Garden Are...

Have you been thinking about renovating your flower garden?  Trying to decide which perennial and annual flowers would grow best in your garden?   Well, guess no longer!  Come spend a day with Pam Bennett, OSU Extension Horticulture Educator, and find out for yourself.  In Clark County, Pam and her volunteers specialize in herbaceous ornamental plant trials and evaluate more than 200 varieties of annuals and two genera of ornamental grasses yearly!

 

...
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Erik Draper

Slime Mold on Turfgrass

Slime molds can be found on all types of turfgrasses – from cultivars chosen for lawns to weedy grasses that pop up in places were regular maintenance just isn’t regular. Slime molds are usually more noticeable following extended periods of leaf wetness. With recent rains experienced in NW Ohio, people have been asking "what is going on in my lawn?"
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Amy Stone

Fall Webworm Update

Fall Webworm has two generations per season in Ohio. The "fall" in the webworm's common name is based on the appearance of second generation nests late in the season. The first generation began to appear in southern Ohio in late May (see, "Spring, Summer, Fall Webworms," June 13, 2018) and second generation caterpillars are now on the scene.
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Joe Boggs

Sneaky Stink Bugs

I'm seeing damage on ripening tomatoes in southwest Ohio caused by Brown Marmorated Stink Bug nymphs. I first saw damage from both the adults and nymphs on my own tomatoes in 2015. At that time, we didn't know which direction BMSB populations would take in the southwest part of the state.
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Joe Boggs

Morning Dew Brings Gossamer Creations to Light

This is the time of the year in Ohio when female spiders of many web spinning species reach maturity. They become most evident when their gossamer creations are illuminated by early morning sunlight reflecting off a heavy dew. I was lucky to experience this magical but fleeting light effect during an early morning hike around my neighborhood a few days ago.
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Joe Boggs

A Real Sweet Dilemma

I was asked to help a vegetable grower figure out what was going on with something wreaking havoc and eating his ripening sweet corn.  Typically, when someone mentions sweet corn and problems, the first demon that comes to mind are those little masked, sweet-toothed bandits, known as raccoons!   When I arrived out in the field, I was surprised to see the corn stalks standing tall in nice rows.  The masked marauders climb up the cornstalk to the get to the ripest, uppermost ear of corn; consequently, the corn stalks are most often snapped off or pushed over down to the...

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Erik Draper

A Blooming Bias

In the world of plants, most often our attention focuses on bloom color, size and timing of when blooms will make an impact in our landscape.  Blooms are nice as a moving focal point during the growing season, but people become a little upset when plants don’t do what they are supposed to and only when they are supposed to do it.  This is the time of year that concerned citizens call into the office wondering whether or not their magnolias or rhododendrons are going to die.  When asked why they think that the plants are going to die, the response is always the same, “...

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Erik Draper

Blister Beetles Wreaking Havoc on Tomatoes

I received two e-mails over the weekend from backyard gardeners in southwest Ohio with pictures showing Black Blister Beetles swarming over tomato plants. Black blister beetles as well as Margined Blister Beetles are the two most common species found in Ohio. Both beetles are capable of showing-up in large numbers to feed on the leaves and flowers of a wide range of perennials and annuals including vegetable plants.
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Joe Boggs

Marestail (Horseweed)

Marestail, which is also known as "Canadian horseweed," or just "horseweed," has moved from field crops to become a plague in landscapes and nurseries. The main reason is that certain biotypes are resistant to glyphosate (e.g. Roundup) as well as a number of other agricultural herbicides. In fact, this native North America plant has become such a problem in Ohio it has been added to the state's noxious weeds list.
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Joe Boggs

Monstrous Porcelain-Berry Barrage

I posted a BYGL Alert last October on Porcelain-Berry when the problem berries were fully ripened and available for widespread distribution by birds and other animals. I'm revisiting this ever-expanding non-native vine because its invasive arc in southwest Ohio is being compared by some horticultural professionals as possibly rivaling kudzu.
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Joe Boggs

Embrace the Milkweed Menagerie

This is the time of the year when the menagerie of insects that feed on members of the dogbane family (Apocynaceae), including common milkweed, seem to arrive en masse … to the consternation of monarch lovers! Some aim to reserve milkweeds for monarchs. What about other native insects that feed on milkweeds; let them eat cake?
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Joe Boggs

Basswood Leafminer Damage Becoming Evident

BYGL readers should be familiar with the Basswood Leafminer. We've reported on the skeletonizing and leafmining activities of this native beetle on its namesake host, American basswood for years. High populations cause entire basswood trees to become reddish-brown. Travelers on the northern portion of I-75 in Ohio will soon be treated to "flaming" basswoods gracing the woodlots along the route.
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Joe Boggs

Annual of the Week - Dahlia

Dahlias can be a nice annual addition into Ohio gardens. Although a perennial in its native range in Mexico and Central America, there are consider annuals in Ohio. With a little extra work the tubers can be lift in the fall, stored over the winter, and planted the following spring. 
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Amy Stone

Ohio Local Foods Week 2018

Can we all agree that there is something special about the taste of a locally grown tomato – unless of course you don’t like tomatoes. The same can be true of other fruits and vegetables grown in our own gardens or produced by a local farmer. Beyond the taste, there is something to be said about food being produced in the region rather than shipped across the state, country or even oceans. There is a renewed appeal in local.   
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Amy Stone

51st Annual NGLCO Summer Field Day for Nurseries, Designers, Landscape Contractors and Vendors to be held on Tuesday, August 14th.

Nursery Growers, Landscapers, Designers and Vendors are invited to a fun-filled, information-packed day at the 51st annual NGLCO Summer Field Day at Chalet Debonne' Vineyards, Madison Ohio on Tuesday August 14th, 2018.
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New OSU FactSheet on Growing Onions

Did you know that the common onion (Allium cepa) is the most popular vegetable in Ohio home gardens? Onions are known to be adaptable, which helps onions to be grown in various regions and zones. Sabrina Schirtzinger, Extension Educator in Knox County, recently authored OSU FactSheet, HYG-1616, Growing Onions in the Garden. 
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Amy Stone

New OSU FactSheet on Hydrangeas

There seems to be a growing interest in hydrangeas. Along with the new or renewed interest in this genus, there are some common questions about plant selection, pruning and care. Eric Barrett, Extension Educator in Mahoning County, recently authored an OSU FactSheet HYG 1263, Selecting Hydrangeas for the Home Landscape to help gardeners understand this group of plants in the genus Hydrangea. 
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Amy Stone

The Twisted Story of Rose Rosette Disease

I came across several multiflora roses while walking in a county park last Friday that were being hammered by Rose Rosette Disease (RRD). It was a reminder that this non-native invasive rose serves as a significant source of the rose rosette virus that is responsible for producing Rose Rosette Disease (RRD), as well as the eriophyid mite that is responsible for spreading the virus.
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Joe Boggs
Jim Chatfield

Ohio Christmas Tree Association (OCTA) at the Ohio State Fair

Earlier this week, a team from OSU Extension judged Christmas trees at the 2018 Ohio State Fair. All the trees were grown in Ohio. Trees were judged on shape, fullness, color and overall appearance. Trees needed to be between 6 and 8 feet tall, have a handle between 6 and 12 inches, and have a correct range of taper based on the species.
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Amy Stone

The Clock is Ticking on White Pine Weevil Control

I received an e-mail message today from an arborist in southwest Ohio who included images that showed damage caused by White Pine Weevil. Main shoots (terminal leaders) on white pine and Norway spruce were wilted and brown. Some of the shoot tips were curved into "shepherd’s crooks;" the curling occurs when tender new shoots dehydrate while they are still pliable.
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Joe Boggs

Tale of Two Crabapples: Diagnostics Is Never Easy

Summertime: And Diagnosis is never easy.  Even with something as dear to my pathological brain as apple scab and cedar-apple (or hawthorn) rust on crabapple. I was on a walkabout at a northeast Ohio commercial landscape two weeks ago and came upon side-by-side crabapples – and the different symptoms of these two diseases on crabapple.

 

On one crabapple, apple scab infections caused some affected leaves to turn yellow before dropping; on the other crabapple the leaves turned orangish-red (the cover photo). As for rust, the lesions on the upper leaf surfaces of one crabapple...

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Jim Chatfield
Joe Boggs

Gypsy Moth - The Next Generation

Adult gypsy moths are active in NW Ohio. The males are brown to tan in color, fly during the day in a zig zag pattern and have feather-like antenna. The females are white and do not fly. The male moths seek out the females, they mate and she lays an egg mass that can contain up to 500 eggs. It is those eggs that will produce the next generation.
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Amy Stone

Yellow Poplar Weevil Reared its Snout in Central Ohio

We held our OSU Extension Nursery, Landscape, and Turf Team (ENLTT) meeting yesterday at Dawes Arboretum. Among the beautiful landscapes and impressive collections was clear evidence that Yellow Poplar Weevils had made a return appearance in central Ohio. The adults feed on leaves and the larvae feed within leaves as leafminers.
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Joe Boggs

Pollinator Pretense

My BYGL Alert last week on magnolia scale honeydew attracting flies [see "Magnolias Drawing Flies," June 5] drew several e-mails about flies coming to flowers. I must admit that I never paid much attention to flies coming to flowers until relatively recently.
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Joe Boggs

Wheel Bugs are Rolling Along

Curtis Young (OSU Extension, Van Wert County) brought an oak sample to the OSU Master Gardener Volunteer Diagnostic Workshop Monday in Miami County that included wheel bug nymphs in various instar stages of development including some late instars. This means the unusual looking adults will soon be lurking among the leaves of trees and shrubs in Ohio in search of prey.
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Joe Boggs

Invasive Species Success

 

In recent years you have likely read more, learned more and maybe even seen more invasive species. Whether it is plants, diseases or insects, these pests should be on the radar - especially in the green industry. 

 

I was recently reading a local paper and the headline "Border authorities find invasive beetles in a bag of seeds" of course caught my attention. The invasive species encounter was success thanks to the work of US Customs and Border Protection.

 

Late last week, US Customs and Border Protection announced in a release that agriculture...

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Amy Stone
Sand Wasp Enemy of Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs boggs.47@osu.edu Sun, 07/08/2018 - 15:14
I'm interested in observations about cicada killer wasps this season [see "No Killers in Sight as Dog-Day Cicadas Sing," July 6, 2018]. So, when Jeff Webeler (White Oak Gardens, Cincinnati) e-mailed this past Friday about a large numbers of wasps digging in sand backfill behind a retaining wall, I drove at more or less the speed limit to visit the site.
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Joe Boggs

Asiatic vs. Oriental Lilies... Same Plants or Different?

I marveled at the incredible display of blooms and colors on the patch of lilies that I could see as I looked out from the deck over the Drapescape.  Because of the intense colors, I just had to go get my camera and take some pictures.  As I started reflecting on the names of these plants, I realized that I had to label the pictures and two names started to flip back and forth in my mind; namely, Asiatic or Oriental or are these colloquial terms or are these actually one in the same for one plant or were the plants different?  What scary thoughts for a woody plant...

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Authors
Erik Draper

Fluffy Flatids

Clusters of fluffy, white flatid planthopper nymphs are appearing on the stems and leaves of low growing plants in southwest Ohio. The planthoppers are most commonly found in woodlands, but will occasionally creep up the stems of plants in landscapes as well as vegetable gardens.
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Joe Boggs

Magnolias Drawing Flies

I received an e-mail Tuesday from a homeowner asking why there are a large number of flies buzzing around their magnolia. I sent them a picture of Magnolia Scale and told them to look for this insect on the twigs and branches. They responded that they had seen the scale, but thought it was a normal part of the tree. Sneaky scales!
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Joe Boggs

Follow up on winter injury to roses

Back in the spring, I wrote a BYGL alert about winter injury to roses.  THANKS to everyone for their feedback and response as to what's being seen around the state.  It seems that the general consensus is that all types of roses experienced major dieback with damage clear down to around four to six inches above the graft.  Some lost a few roses completely but the majority of the roses have recovered nicely according to most.  Winter injury reports came from all around Ohio as well as from Detroit.

 

It still drives me crazy to drive around town and see the old dead wood...

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Pam Bennett

Night Raiders

It's often impossible to identify the insect culprit responsible for causing holes or jagged margins on tree leaves if the perpetrator has left the scene. Unless there is a clear association between the tree species and a pest, we rely on dubious "it could be" speculation to solve a bit-and-run.
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Joe Boggs
Sedum Erratum boggs.47@osu.edu Sat, 06/30/2018 - 12:00
I posted a BYGL Alert this past Tuesday about an unidentified flea beetle attacking sedum in Ohio [see "Sedum Conundrum and Passionate Plea," June 26]. I called the beetle the "Sedum Flea Beetle" in my report.
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Joe Boggs
Lovely American Lotus boggs.47@osu.edu Fri, 06/29/2018 - 19:41
American lotus (Nelumbo lutea) is one of my favorite native wildflowers. In my opinion, there is nothing else that rises from our waters to rival the allure of this aquatic beauty; except perhaps for walleye and largemouth bass.
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Joe Boggs
Head Clipper Attacks Cone Heads boggs.47@osu.edu Thu, 06/28/2018 - 20:26
Participants in today's OSU Extension, Hamilton County, Master Gardner Volunteers Diagnostic Walk-About at Glenwood Gardens were treated to the handiwork of the Sunflower Headclipping Weevil on purple coneflower. The damage included dangling seed heads and stems that looked like soda straws.
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Joe Boggs
Cedar-Quince Rust on Callery Pear boggs.47@osu.edu Wed, 06/27/2018 - 22:09
We reported on cedar-quince rust on hawthorns in a BYGL Alert! a couple of weeks ago [see "Rusty Hawthorns," June 14]. The disease is so common on hawthorns it's become an annual BYGL missive. However, we were surprised by recent observations of cedar-quince rust occurring on Callery pear.
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Joe Boggs
Jim Chatfield
Ohio Arbovirus Surveillance Updates andon.1 Wed, 06/27/2018 - 15:15

Beginning this year, the Ohio Arbovirus (arthropod-borne virus) Surveillance Update can be found on the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) website at http://www.odh.ohio.gov/arboupdate.  The table will be updated each Monday through mosquito season.

Mosquito season is here.  The ODH Zoonotic Disease Program, in partnership with ODH Laboratory, local public health partners and sanitary district partners, collects and tests mosquitoes from many communities in Ohio as part of statewide mosquito-borne disease surveillance...

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Jennifer Andon
Check Out Some Educational Opportunities stone.91@osu.edu Wed, 06/27/2018 - 13:53
The OSU Woodland Stewards Program offers educational workshops, programs and tours throughout the year. The classes are always listed on their website, but here is a special shout out for three programs you don't want to miss.
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Amy Stone
Sedum Conundrum and Passionate Plea boggs.47@osu.edu Tue, 06/26/2018 - 18:08
In early October, 2011, I received a phone call from a homeowner in eastern Cincinnati who said brightly colored beetles were destroying her Sedum x 'Autumn Joy' (family Crassulaceae). I visited and found that a flea beetle that I'd never seen before was doing so much damage it was hard to identify the plants.
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Joe Boggs
Some Gypsy Moth Caterpillars Have Met Their Match stone.91@osu.edu Mon, 06/25/2018 - 15:57

 

While there has been an increase of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) sightings in northwest Ohio, specifically in Lucas and Fulton Counties, late last week some of the leaf eating caterpillars appeared to be dying. Upon closer inspection, it appears that entomophaga (Entomophaga maimaiga), or the gypsy moth fungus, is doing the trick.

 

Gypsy moth caterpillars killed by the fungus entomophaga typically die hanging vertically from the tree trunks with their prolegs stretched out laterally. Caterpillar appear to shrink in girth and become somewhat...

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Amy Stone
Pinecones on Willow? They're Baaack! boggs.47@osu.edu Mon, 06/25/2018 - 11:58
Willow Pinecone Galls are one of the most unusual galls found in Ohio; I post a BYGL Alert! about them every year. Maybe more than one to spread the gall-joy! The galls are created by the Willow Pinecone Gall Midge to house, nourish, and protect a single fly larva (maggot) located deep within the gall. The literature lists a number of willow hosts; however, I've only ever found them on black willow.
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Joe Boggs

Burgeoning Beetles

I'm seeing large numbers of Japanese Beetles (Popillia japonica) in southwest Ohio. Compared to previous seasons, the beetles appear to be more evenly distributed; they are not hard to find. I'm hearing similar reports from the central part of the state.
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Joe Boggs

Families- A Grouping or Gathering of Similar Plants

Have you ever thought “why in the world should I care about plant families?” Or why does it matter if a plant belongs to a certain family?  What if you were asked, “Can my Pyracantha (firethorn) shrubs get fireblight?”  or “What other plants could be possible target hosts for the Emerald Ash Borer”?  You will be able to understand the answers to these questions, IF YOU UNDERSTAND THE IMPACT OF PLANT FAMILIES! 
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Authors
Erik Draper
Jim Chatfield

Twisted Tale of Dodder

Dodders are parasitic plants belonging to the morning glory family, Convolvulaceae. They were formerly placed in the dodder family, Cuscutaceae, with only one genus in the family, Cuscuta. Depending on the reference, there are somewhere between 100 – 170 species worldwide with 13 species found in Ohio.
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Joe Boggs

More Lace Bugs

Lace bugs do well during hot weather and they are certainly doing very well. I'm finding population densities and levels of damage that are normally seen in July. I posted a report on hawthorn lace bugs this past Saturday; this report highlights a few others.
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Joe Boggs

A Most Beautiful Beetle

This is the time of the year when a close look at dogbane may reveal Dogbane Beetles; one of the most beautiful beetles found in Ohio. Indeed, the beetle's scientific name, Chrysochus auratus, loosely translates to "made of gold." This native beetle should be familiar to BYGL readers; it's one of my favorite insects and I post at least one report about it each year!
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Joe Boggs

National Pollinator Week Begins Today

The Pollinator Partnership is proud to announce that June 18-24, 2018 has been designated National Pollinator Week. This week long observation is a time to celebrate pollinators and spread the word about what can be done to protect them.

 

Eleven years ago the U.S. Senate’s unanimous approval and designation of a week in June as “National Pollinator Week” marked a necessary step toward addressing the urgent issue of declining pollinator populations. Pollinator Week has now grown into an international celebration of the valuable ecosystem services provided...

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Amy Stone

Sneaky Bagworms

I'm not yet saying this is going to be a banner season for Common Bagworms. However, I'm commonly finding bagworms in southwest Ohio without much effort. I've not heard reports from elsewhere in the state
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Joe Boggs

Scarlet Oak Sawfly Damage is Underway

First generation scarlet oak sawfly larvae are beginning to skeletonize oak leaves in southwest Ohio. The larvae are currently in the 1st and 2nd instar stages and a little less than 1/8" long. Despite this sawfly's common name, larvae may be found feeding on a wide range of oaks including pin, black, red, and white oaks as well as its namesake oak.
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Joe Boggs

Diagnosis: Bird...Or

Is it a birds-nest or is it something else? Birds-nest fungi are fascinating organisms, complete with little nest-like spore casings that act as splash cups, and peridioles complete with funicular cords. Oh, what wonders.
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Authors
Jim Chatfield
Paul Snyder

Rusty Hawthorns

This is the time of the year when rust diseases make it easy to spot wild hawthorns growing along Ohio trails as well as in landscapes. They have orange spotted leaves and "orange-hairy haws." I may be exaggerating a bit, but these rust symptoms can certainly make woodland hikes interesting.
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Joe Boggs

ODA Announces Gypsy Moth Mating Disruption Treatment

 

The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) recently announced plans to begin aerial treatments designed to disrupt gypsy moth mating later this summer. Treatments will be applied to 32,526 acres in fifteen counties across the state. 
 

The gypsy moth is a non-native, invasive species that feeds on the leaves of more than 300 different trees and shrubs and is especially fond of oak as a caterpillar as shown below.

 

...

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Amy Stone
Marginal Leaf Fold Galls on Oaks and Black Locust boggs.47@osu.edu Wed, 06/13/2018 - 15:32
A couple of weeks ago, me and several of my Extension colleagues came across so-called marginal leaf fold galls on an oak on the OSU campus during a photography workshop. Since that time, I'm commonly finding these galls on oaks belonging to the "red oak group" as well as a similar gall on black locust in southwest Ohio.
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Joe Boggs

Perceived Willow Woes

I'm an unabashed fan of willows. Of course, no tree is perfect and willows have a few pests. Thankfully, the depth of their vital spark means willows are capable of handling the depredations of most pests. However, the pests I'm highlighting can make trees look bad.
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Joe Boggs

Ghosts in the Mist Thistle

Canada Thistle in southwest Ohio is starting to show the "ghostly" white symptoms of bacterial infections. The tops of infected plants look like they were dipped in bleach. The bacterium produces a chemical called tagetitoxin which is a RNA polymerase III inhibitor that blocks the production of chloroplasts.
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Joe Boggs
Galls and Tree Identification boggs.47@osu.edu Fri, 06/08/2018 - 19:26
Making a correct tree identification is the critical first step in correctly diagnosing a tree problem. Of course, sometimes the diagnosis identifies the tree. Insect galls are often so host-specific, they can give you six-legs up on tree identification.
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Joe Boggs

Really MOOOving Along in NE Ohio

Driving along in Northeast Ohio, I came around a bend in the road and saw some tall weeds with clusters of white flowers in the roadside ditch.  The flower heads had the classic shape of the Apiaceae or carrot family with the typical “compound umbels” on display.  Think of an upside down umbrella with all the flower clusters radiating upward from a single point end of the stalk to form a flattened flower head about 6-10” across.  So, I just had to stop and look at these plants knowing the concern that they will incite when people panic because they think they are seeing...

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Erik Draper

Mystery Nest? Don't call 911 just yet!

Last week, a local police officer was called out to a property for mysterious “bug” activity.  An unusual nest was reported on the property and the concerned homeowners did not know what it was or what to do with it.  Luckily, the officer knew to call their local Extension office and soon we were ON THE CASE!  (Here come the sleuthing puns!)

 


mystery nest...

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Authors
Ashley Kulhanek
Marne Titchenell

Four-lined Plant Bug Crushing Oregano (and other plants)

Perennial plants (and others) are showing damage caused by four-lined plant bug (Poecilocapus lineatus) with some plants exhibiting heavy damage.  For instance, my oregano is totally obliterated.  I usually say no worries to this pest as it is a one and done insect; it has one life cycle in the early part of spring.  The damage is caused early enough in the season that I don't usually worry about taking action with pesticides.  However, this year is anything but normal and I am altering my normal approach a bit.

...
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Pam Bennett
A Blistering Wild Parsnip Report boggs.47@osu.edu Fri, 06/01/2018 - 15:55
Wild parsnip plants are rising towards their full height and their yellow blooms are beginning to open in southern Ohio. Landscape managers and gardeners should exercise extreme caution around this non-native invasive plant.
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Joe Boggs
Poison Hemlock is in Full Flower and Towering over Fields and Landscapes in Ohio. boggs.47@osu.edu Fri, 06/01/2018 - 15:27
Poison hemlock is one of the most lethal plants found in North America. This biennial weed is now in full flower throughout much of Ohio. So, the clock is ticking on preventing seed production by this non-native invasive plant.
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Joe Boggs
Wolves in Sheep's Clothing boggs.47@osu.edu Fri, 06/01/2018 - 11:44
Julie Crook and I visited a magnolia in her landscape on Tuesday that is infested with Magnolia Scale. We had intended to evaluate a soft scale control method using dish scrubbers to physically remove the scales. I learned about this scale suppression technique from Dan Potter (University of Kentucky Entomology).
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Joe Boggs
Julie Crook
Seeing Red boggs.47@osu.edu Thu, 05/31/2018 - 12:36
I'm continuing to get reports of huge numbers of tiny, fast-moving bright red mites scurrying around on sunny surfaces such as on picnic tables, patios, sidewalks, concrete retaining walls, and on the outside walls of homes and buildings. These nuisance mites are sometimes called "concrete mites" owing to locations where they tend to congregate
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Joe Boggs
Calico Scale-Crawl boggs.47@osu.edu Thu, 05/31/2018 - 10:10
Calico scale eggs located beneath helmet-shaped females are hatching in southwest Ohio and the 1st instar nymphs (crawlers) are on the move. Unlike armored scales, all nymphal stages of this soft scale are mobile, so nymphs can be called "crawlers" throughout their development
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Joe Boggs
Bagworm Alert! boggs.47@osu.edu Wed, 05/30/2018 - 11:53
Overwintered Common Bagworm eggs are hatching in southwest Ohio. The tiny 1st instar bags are constructed with pieces of tan to reddish-brown sawdust-like frass (excrement) stuck to the outside of silk and look like "dunce caps."
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Joe Boggs
White Flower Day chatfield.1@osu.edu Thu, 05/24/2018 - 09:15
A day in the garden and landscape. White flowers to identify, some known, some newly known. The more you look, the more you find, the more you learn.
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Jim Chatfield
Asian Chestnut Gall Wasp jagger.6@osu.edu Tue, 05/22/2018 - 17:10
The Asian Chestnut Gall Wasp was introduced to North America in 1974 on imported chestnut cuttings. To date it has be identified in Georgia, Alabama, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, Tennessee and Ohio.
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Carri Jagger

Soil Temps Determine Planting Time

One of the most often asked vegetable questions during this early season is “How soon can I plant my tomatoes and peppers in the garden?”  There are two reasons that the northeast Ohio gardener’s rule of thumb is “wait for Memorial Day” before planting out the tender annuals like tomatoes, peppers and green beans.  The first reason is the possibility of a frost is almost eliminated by waiting until Memorial Day.  Those tender annual plants like squash, tomatoes, green beans and peppers, cannot tolerate a frost event or even lower temperatures at all!...

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Erik Draper

What's Your Number - Growing Degree Day Accumulations

 

This time of the year, some areas can be accumulating growing degree days (GDD) pretty rapidly, while in other areas it is a slower process. Joe Boggs reported to some ENLTers last week that the Cincinnati area broke a record and experienced a 90 degree day. It's truly a different story in Toledo. We have been on the receiving end of lots of rain and much cooler temperatures. There have been some days where our low and high temperatures added together didn't add up to 90. 

 

To illustrate the differences that are occurring in the buckeye state, I have looked at...

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Amy Stone

Invasive of the Week - Autumn Olive

 

I was walking today and came upon a sweet smell. Excitement built as the fragrance intensified only to be disappointed. The fragrance was a familiar spring scent that I only remembered when I saw the plant. Its white to light yellow flowers hung against its silvery green foliage - yes you guess it - autumn olive (Elaeagnus umbellata). This deciduous plant can be consider a small tree or shrub. The stem, buds and leaves are covered with scales that are silver in color. 

 

...

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Amy Stone

Wildflowers of Spring

Like other plants, wildflowers bided their time in Spring this year. In recent weeks, though, the display was wondrous. From bloodroot to trillium, to the luck of the bluets, woodland flowers are ever magical.
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Jim Chatfield
Unheavenly Ambrosia Beetles boggs.47@osu.edu Thu, 05/17/2018 - 14:53
I've received a number of reports recently from landscape managers and arborists of thin cylindrical strands of white sawdust appearing to ooze out of small holes in the trunks of recently planted trees. These delicate, odd looking structures are sometimes called "frass toothpicks" and are the calling card of Ambrosia Beetles. They also indicate trees are in serious, irreversible trouble.
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Joe Boggs

Name These Flowers

Have you ever experienced this - noticing something for the first time, yet realizing that you must have seen it for years without realizing it was there. That was the experience of a group of plant lovers earlier this spring. Oh, my, what we were missing. Beautiful red flowers, unfamiliar, on a familiar tree.
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Jim Chatfield
Erik Draper

Oystershell Scale Eggs Are Hatching!

The overwintered eggs of Oystershell Scale are hatching in Ohio with first instar nymphs (crawlers) afoot in the southwest and northwest parts of the state. This is a critical event because the mobile crawlers are susceptible to a number of control options that are not effective against other scale developmental stages.
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Joe Boggs
Beth Scheckelhoff

Words of Wisdom

There are many lessons of Nature to be learned from the words of others. Though Shakespeare intoned: "In Nature's infinite book of secrecy a little I can read", even that little may be most wondrous.
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Jim Chatfield

Woody of the Week - Ohio Buckeye

The Ohio buckeye (Aesculus glabra) is the state tree of Ohio. It is a native tree to the midwestern and plain states. The tree can reach 60 feet tall and 30 feet wide in an open area, but is about 1/2 that size when growing in an understory or shaded location. 

 

The Ohio buckeye prefers a moist but well drained site. It can adapt to drier sites, but will often exhibit some leaf scorch when conditions are too dry.  It is also susceptible to a leaf blotch and powdery mildew when conditions are right. 

 

The leaves are arranged opposite of each other...

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Amy Stone

Woody of the Week - Pawpaw

Pawpaw (Asimina triloba) is found throughout the buckeye state and most of the Eastern United States. It grows naturally as an understory tree or along woodland edges, and is often found in areas that are moist.

 

A single tree can sometimes become a "pawpaw-colony" through root sprouts from the parent plant. The mature height of this tree is 25 feet and the mature spread is 15 feet, when not crowded by other plants. The leaves are rather large giving the plant a tropical feel. 

 

While the plant is noted for its fruit, the flowers are beautiful but...

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Amy Stone

Ant Wars

I opened my garage door this morning to find a seething mass of Pavement Ants roiling around the expansion joint where the driveway meets the garage. This was not an "ant swarm" where large numbers of winged ants (alates) emerge to fly off and mate; it was a full-blown, no-holds-bared ant war
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Joe Boggs

Crabmania 2018

Crabapple bloom was at its best in Ohio this year. Prolonged in southern Ohio, but compressed but spectacular and late in central and northern Ohio. Check out a few highlights here.
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Jim Chatfield

Mosquito Alert

Residual pools of standing water left from above average rainfall throughout much of Ohio this spring certainly benefitted mosquitoes. Although our cooler than normal spring temperatures may have delayed the onset of "mosquito season" a bit, our current above average temperatures will put mosquito development into hyperdrive.
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Joe Boggs

Roses Knocked Back by Winter Cold

Several types of roses in Central and Southern (confirmed by Joe Boggs) were knocked back pretty good by cold winter weather.  While trimming my shrub and carpet-type roses in early April I noticed quite a bit of dead wood.  I had to really trim them back to a height of about six inches.  They are looking great right now as the new growth is vigorous.  I completely lost one climbing rose and another one was killed back to the crown.  The new growth on this one is coming from the root stock.

...
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Pam Bennett

Butterweed / Cressleaf Groundsel: Beauty is in the Eye of the Beholder

The dichotomous nature of Butterweed may test the tolerance of lovers of native wildflowers. On one hand, a sea of yellow flowers carpeting farm fields flanking Ohio's interstates in the spring provides welcome relief from highway monotony. On the other hand, upright 2 – 3' tall plants bolting seemingly out of nowhere in Ohio landscapes presents a weed management challenge.
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Joe Boggs

ODA Will Begin Treating for Gypsy Moth in Ohio

 

The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) will soon begin aerial treatments designed to manage gypsy moth populations in Ohio. One management option includes treating young caterpillars in the spring. Counties where these treatments will be applied to designated blocks include:

 

  • Franklin
  • Fulton
  • Hocking
  • Lucas
  • Marion
  • Morrow
  • Perry
  • Ross
  • Sandusky
  • Seneca
  • Vinton
  • Wyandot

 

The treatments aimed at the larval stage will begin early to mid-...

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Amy Stone

Look Up Before Parking Under Honeylocust Trees … and Elms, Hawthorns, Sweetgum, Zelkova …

We have a shopping center and hospital not far from my home in southwest Ohio that have parking lot tree planters with honeylocusts, lacebark elms, and a number of other types of trees. The trees provide shade, so they are car magnets. Unfortunately, a considerable number of the trees are heavily infested with Calico Scale.
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Joe Boggs

Boxwoods Go Snap, Crackle, and Pop!

I've already posted a BYGL Alert on Boxwood Leafminer this season that described its life-cycle, detection, and management. However, I only briefly described one of the most notable side effects associated with this non-native midge fly: odd rustling or popping sounds radiating from heavily infested boxwoods.
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Joe Boggs
Curtis E. Young

Wilting Buckeyes

The handiwork of the Buckeye Petiole Borer is now becoming evident on its namesake host in southern Ohio. Individual caterpillars of this tiny native moth bore into leaf petioles to disrupt vascular flow causing leaves to droop, wilt, and turn dark green to black. Damaged leaves will eventually detach producing mild defoliation. Symptoms may superficially resemble frost or freeze damage.
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Joe Boggs

Horned Oak Galls "Pop"

The physical emergence of the "horns" that give horned oak galls their common name is such a short-lived event I've only witnessed it one other time in 26 years. I've commonly observed fully extended horns, but seeing them in the process of breaking through the gall surface is a rare treat and it's happening right now in southwest Ohio.
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Joe Boggs

Mining Bees on the Wing

There are many species of bees that create individual (solitary) burrows in the soil. Several hymenopteran families are represented including Andrenidae (Mining Bees), Apidae (Tribe Anthophorini (Digger Bees)), and Colletidae which are called cellophane bees owing to the waterproof plastic-like material they use to line their soil burrows. They all have one thing in common: they are important pollinators.
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Joe Boggs

Tigers on the Prowl

I spotted one of my favorite insect predators darting about on forest trails yesterday: Six-Spotted Tiger Beetles. Their common name is well justified as these tiny "tigers" hunt, kill, and eat other insects. They are equipped with huge eyes for excellent eyesight, long legs for agile speed, and huge mandibles for grabbing prey.
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Joe Boggs

Browned Boxwoods

Boxwoods with light brown to golden brown leaves are common this spring in Greater Cincinnati. Some of the leaf browning is due to winter injury; some was caused by salt damage. However, a close examination may also reveal the telltale blister-like leaf symptoms caused by the boxwood leafminer.
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Joe Boggs

Watch Your ASH!

Now that the Emerald Ash Borer has infested Lake County, Ohio, many Green Ash trees in the landscape and forest woodlots have died. But the real danger is right overhead. With dead trees and wind combined, it can be a costly and deadly combination. A tree that shows severe infestation will die within the year. The danger is these trees soon become a fall hazard and need to be removed before injury or property damage occurs.
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Thomas deHaas

They're Baaack!

Last Friday, Larry Parker (Cincinnati Parks) sent to me the images below of Boxelder Bugs (Boisea trivittata, order Hemiptera) hanging out on a park's building. 'Tis the season.
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Joe Boggs

Managing Crabgrass in Turf

With these rains the lawn is beginning to grow and the weeds are not far behind.  Some of the earliest emerging broadleaf weeds have begun to emerge.  The biggest problem with weeds in turfgrass is reduced aesthetic value, although some weeds can out compete turfgrass when management is reduced.  Smooth and large crabgrass, yellow foxtail, and annual bluegrass are the most frequent annual grass weeds in turfgrass.
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Jeff Stachler

Cold Weather Offers an Extension on Poison Hemlock Management

Our slowly developing spring is a real boon to us procrastinators. If you exercise caution by performing a close inspection of what lies beneath, there may still be time to make a non-selective herbicide application to control Poison Hemlock without wiping out preferred plants that have not yet sprung for spring.
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Joe Boggs

Eastern Tent Cats Hatch

Astronomical spring is marked by the vernal equinox. I mark "entomological spring" when overwintered Eastern Tent Caterpillar (ETC) moth eggs hatch. That's why I always collect a few egg masses in late winter and hold them outside (in the shade) so I can monitor for this supernal event. It began happening today at around 12:00 p.m.
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Joe Boggs

Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) Eradication Program in Ohio Scores a "Win"

Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) is potentially the most devastating non-native pest to have ever arrived in North America. The beetle kills trees belonging to 12 genera in 9 plant families. This includes all native maples, a preferred host. Successful eradication is essential to avoiding a catastrophic loss of trees on a scale never before seen in the U.S.
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Joe Boggs

Burrowing Crayfish Rise

The rise of "mud chimneys" produced by Burrowing Crayfish has long been one of my favorite harbingers of spring. I've recently observed several of these mud edifices peaking just above turfgrass in southwest Ohio. While none had yet reached catastrophic lawn mower blade-bending size; spring is definitely in the air.
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Joe Boggs

Act Now to Manage White Pine Weevil

White Pine Weevil is one of our sneakiest conifer pests found in Ohio. Females spend the winter out of sight cooling their six heels in the duff beneath their pine or spruce targets. As temperatures warm in the spring, they climb their hosts to feed and lay eggs in the terminals. Sap oozing from small holes in the terminals is a calling card of this weevil.
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Joe Boggs

Invasive Plants Regulated in Ohio

Here is a look back to look forward as it relates to invasive plants in Ohio and new rules effective January 7, 2018 -

 

In September of 2014, the Ohio General Assembly granted the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) the exclusive authority to regulate invasive plants species. Under the law invasive plants are defined as plant species that are not native to Ohio whose introduction causes or is likely to cause economic or environmental harm, or harm to human health as determined by scientific studies.

 

...
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Amy Stone

Invasive Species Awareness Week - ORIENTAL BITTERSWEET - Invasive Species of the Day

Sometimes referred to as the "kudzu of the north", oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus) is a non-native species that continues to grow and spread in Ohio. The vine is popping up in our woods, fence rows, landscapes and places in between.

 

It is important to know that we do have American bittersweet (Celastrus scandens). It has more elliptical shaped leaves, rather than the rounded of the Oriental bittersweet. American bittersweet can also be distinguished from Oriental bittersweet by its leaves when they are just beginning to emerge from...

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Amy Stone

National Invasive Species Awareness Week - GYPSY MOTH - Invasive Species of the Day

We are going way back in time for this invasive species during the 2018 National Invasive Species Awareness Week. 

 

In the 1860's a French artist and amateur entomologist, Leopold Trouvelot, brought the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) to North America for what he thought was a good reason. He hoped to use the gypsy moth as the foundation for a silk industry in the United States. The "silk threads" of the gypsy moth did not prove to be a reliable source, and unfortunately the insect escaped Trouvelot’s Boston home-laboratory. 

 

The gyspy moth was ...

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Amy Stone

National Invasive Species Awareness Week - Japanese Knotweed - Invasive Species of the Day

I have noticed Japanese Knotweed (I've seen it listed as: Polygonum cuspidatum or Fallopia japonica or Reynoutria japonica) around the county the last few summers, so I chose it as Tuesday's  INVASIVE of the DAY for National Invasive Plant Awareness Week.

Japanese knotweed is a non-native erect, semi-woody perennial that can grow up to and likely beyond 10 feet tall and create dense stands when unchecked.  It was introduced, as so many invasives were, as an ornamental in the late 1800's and soon escaped the garden-scape and found its way into disturbed...

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Ashley Kulhanek

Wonderful Witchhazels Welcome Warmer Weather

Witchhazels….the forgotten wonder! The flowers are so small and dainty; you could miss them. However, the fragrance is heavenly. Which is why designers, landscapers and homeowner should put them close to an entryway or high traffic area. Since witchhazels flower anytime between mid-February through March, they can easily be missed.
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Thomas deHaas
Silver Maples Blooming Away kulhanek.5 Tue, 02/27/2018 - 15:10

The Silver Maples, Acer saccharinum, in my neck of the woods are blooming.  February or not... feels like "spring" to me!

 

silver maple in bloom

 

 

Silver Maple trees are among the first to bloom in Ohio clocking in at 34 growing degree days (GDD) for first bloom and 42 GDD for full bloom.  I caught these photos at 51 GDD.  You can check your own location by visiting the OSU Phenology...

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Ashley Kulhanek

As Temperatures Warm, Don't Forget Growing Degree Days

 

A recorded breaking warm-up last week is just a distant memory, although continued flooding in certain areas of Ohio is a reminder that precipitation fell as rain and not as snow. While temperatures felt a little bit more winter-like over the weekend, another warm up is on its way. Even though we are still in February, it is not too earlier to begin following the Growing Degree Day Calendar online at https://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/gdd/

 

 

...
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Amy Stone

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid in Lake and Geauga County, Ohio

Hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae, is an invasive insect in eastern North America. It feeds on Canadian Hemlock, Tsuga Canadensis. The insect was discovered last summer feeding on a mature stand of Hemlocks on Little Mountain on a property located on the grounds of Holden Arboretum. Although it is uncertain how the adelgid got there, it is thought that it arrived on birds migrating north. Because of the discovery, both counties have been quarantined. Canadian Hemlocks grown in nurseries located in Lake and/or Geauga County, Ohio will have special requirements and restrictions on movement...
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Thomas deHaas

Spotted Lanternfly Found in Virginia

The spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) was recently detected in Frederick County, Virginia on January 10, 2018. It has been reported that egg masses and a dead adult were found.

 

The spotted lanternfly, an invasive planthopper, was first discovered in the United States in Pennsylvania in the fall of 2014. It is native to China, India, Vietnam, and introduced to Korea where it has become a major pest. This insect has the potential to greatly impact the grape, hops and logging industries. In November of 2017 a single female was found in New Castle County...

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Amy Stone

ODA Announces 2018 Gypsy Moth Treatment Project Open Houses

While all is quite in the gypsy moth's world, much preparation is occurring in Ohio to manage future gypsy moth populations this year as part of the two programs ODA administers:  Slow-The-Spread and Suppression.  Recently ODA released the schedule for their 2018 Gypsy Moth Treatment Open Houses and the 2018 Treatment Maps. Treatment blocks have been identified and are planned in19 Ohio Counties. Treatments will occur after caterpillars hatch this spring and when weather conditions are favorable.  Treatments are made to protect trees from damage from the leaf feeding caterpillars like seen...

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Amy Stone

USDA Updates Emerald Ash Borer Map, January 2018

While emerald ash borer (EAB) may be considered "old-news" in the buckeye state, many may want to keep a watchful eye on its progression beyond Ohio. Each month, USDA APHIS produces an updated EAB Detection Map. Occasionally, we like to post these updated maps on BYGL for those that are interested in monitoring the spread of the pest in North America. 

 

The most recent additions to the map include:

  • initial county detections in: St. Clair and Talladega Counties, Alabama; Queens County, New York; and Eau...
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Amy Stone

ODA Announces New Finds of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid in Ohio in Athens, Geauga and Lake Counties

Earlier today, the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) the Ohio Department of Natural Resources(ODNR) announced the discovery of a hemlock-killing pest in Lake, Geauga and Athens counties. The hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) is a small, aphid-like insect native to Asia, which threatens the health and sustainability of two hemlock tree species native to the eastern United States.

 

HWA was first reported in the eastern United States in 1951 near Richmond, Virginia. Today, it is established in portions of 20 states from...

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Amy Stone

Emerald Ash Borer University - 2018

Emerald Ash Borer University (EABU) recently released the dates and topics of its upcoming "virtual semester." Five FREE webinars are scheduled in February and March. Each session will last approximately one hour. A certificate of participation can be emailed to those participating on the live webinars. All sessions will be recorded and linked to the National EAB Website at www.emeraldashborer.info following the session using YouTube.

 

EABU is a free webinar series supported through the US Forest Service and coordinated by...

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Amy Stone

Honeylocusts and Mastodons

This is a great time of the year to slow down, sit down, and contemplate answers to big questions. Like, what do honeylocusts and pronghorns have in common? Why do Osage orange trees, Kentucky coffeetrees, and avocado trees have such large seed packages? In all cases, what we see now was shaped by animals that no longer exist; they are extinct.
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Joe Boggs
USDA Posts New Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) Newsletter stone.91@osu.edu Fri, 12/29/2017 - 16:01

Earlier today (12/29/2017), the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) posted an eNewsletter designed to keep everyone up-to-date with Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) eradication efforts in the US. While some BYGL readers might receive the eNewsletter directly from USDA, we wanted to make sure as many people are in the "ALB-know" as possible. 

 

Presently, there are active eradication programs operating in three states including New York, Massachusetts and Ohio.

 

While information on eradication efforts in each state is valuable to follow and stay up-...

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Amy Stone
That May Not Be Snow on Those Alders! boggs.47@osu.edu Thu, 12/21/2017 - 15:01
BYGL reports become sparse at this time of the year with cold temperatures suppressing our subject matter. So, I was surprised last Thursday when I got an e-mail from John Martini, University of Cincinnati's Landscape Architect, with an image taken by UC Planner Joe Willging showing collections of white fluffy material on the branches of an alder (Alnus sp.).
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Joe Boggs

Scouting for Scale at Snowy Solstice

Scouting for scale in the Winter is great use of your time. 

Scale comes in many shapes, sizes and varieties. Last year we saw Oyster Shell, Calico, Juniper, Greedy, Bamboo, Fletcher, Japanese maple, Pine Needle, Brown, Putnam, Euonymus and Magnolia Scale.

Scale is sometimes hard to see when a plant is in full foliage. But in the winter with no leaves on trees and shrubs, except evergreen, scale are easier to see.

Scouting scale in the winter makes sense because there is less to care for outside in the landscape. The following pictures are Scale images on the...