Magicicada

Periodical Cicada Brood X: Gone But Not Forgotten boggs.47@osu.edu Thu, 04/28/2022 - 17:12
It’s been around a year since Brood X (10) of the 17-year Periodical Cicadas (Magicicada spp.) serenaded us with their cacophonous love songs. However, their damage continues to plague trees in the landscapes and forests of Ohio.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Periodical Update: Cicada Observations and Educational Opportunities

The anticipated magical appearance of Brood X (10) of the 17-year periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) is getting closer with each day. On one hand, the cicadas are providing clear evidence they are nearly reading take the stage en masse. On the other hand, progress has slowed to glacial speed owing to continual dips in springtime temperatures.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Periodical Cicada: Rounds 1 and 2

Brood VIII (Eight) of the 17-year periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) have made their presence known in parts of northeastern Ohio, western Pennsylvania, and the northern panhandle of West Virginia. As with past brood emergences, the overall geographical distribution is spotty; however, there are localized pockets with heavy cicada activity.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Cicadaville

If you look at a map of the emergence of Brood V of the 17-year cicadas, Magicicada septendecim (what a great name!), for example at cicadamania.com, it looks like almost the entire eastern half of Ohio was destined for the same experience. As we know by now, though, it is not one size fits all. Go to the OSU Mansfield Campus and the cacophony is big-time, go to Wooster and it is the late spring quietude, until dog-day cicadas, which we hear every year arrive later in the summer. Twenty miles south at Mohican State Park and the male cicadas choir is signing in noticeable numbers....

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Authors
Jim Chatfield