bagworm

“Bagworm Season” is Wrapping Up but Bags Will Remain

Common bagworms (family Psychidae) are so-named because the native moth caterpillars live in silk bags festooned with plant debris. It’s the perfect camouflage allowing them to remain undetected until their damage is revealed by their voracious appetites. The “bagworm season” is ending with the caterpillars transitioning from life in a tote bag to life in a sleeping bag.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Bagworm Damage Becoming Obvious

Common bagworms have been with us for a while. Overwintered bagworm eggs began hatching in southwest Ohio at the end of May (see “Bagworm Eggs are Hatching: The Game’s Afoot!,” June 1, 2022). However, it’s amazing how long these general defoliators can continue to crawl below our radar as they chomp on evergreens and deciduous trees and shrubs before their cumulative damage and size finally make them apparent.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Bagworm Season Drawing to a Close

This "bagworm season" which began in early June was marked by damaging localized infestations throughout Ohio. Images showing heavy defoliation from bagworms (Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis) were commonly shared during our weekly BYGL Zoom Inservices. Populations appeared to be higher than has been seen for several years.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

The Bagworm Season is in the Bag

The vast majority of Common Bagworm caterpillars in southwest Ohio have initiated their annual "tie-off" in preparation for pupation. Bags are tightly closed and tied with silk to a twig or other anchorage point. Likewise, male bagworms in the northwest part of the state have tied-off; however, some female caterpillars are continuing to feed.
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Authors
Joe Boggs
Curtis E. Young

Bagworms Reveal Themselves!

This is the time of the year when Common Bagworms come into clear focus owing to their size and noticeable damage. Overwintered eggs hatched in southwest Ohio in early June (see "Be Alert to Bagworms!" posted on June 6). However, it's amazing how well these native moth caterpillars crawl below our radar until their burgeoning appetites finally gives them away.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs