Indiana Department of Natural Resources Announces First Find of Spotted Lanternfly in Indiana

On Friday, June 23, the Indiana Department of Natural Resources announced the first detection of spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) in Indiana. This find is a reminder to be on the look out for this invasive species and report and suspect finds in Ohio. Reports can be made using the Great Lakes Early Detection Network (GLEDN) App, or contacting the Ohio Department of Agriculture by email (plantpest@agri.ohio.gov), phone (614-728-6400), or using the online reporting form on their website at: https://agri.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/oda/divisions/plant-health/invasive-pests/slf
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Amy Stone

Be Alert to Redheaded Pine Sawfly

Redheaded Pine Sawfly (Neodiprion lecontei, order Hymenoptera, family Diprionidae) is so-named because of the markedly red head capsules of the larvae. It’s one of the most damaging conifer sawflies found in Ohio owing to its feeding behavior, wide host range, and the occurrence of two generations. First-generation larvae are in full swing with the second generation on the horizon.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Lacewings (= Good)

Lacewings (order Neuroptera) are delicate insects named for their elaborate lace-like wing venation. Ohio is home to members of two families: green lacewings (family Chrysopidae) and brown lacewings (family Hemerobiidae).
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Lace Bugs (= Bad Bugs)

Lace bugs (order Hemiptera; family Tingidae) are so-named because of the lace-like pattern of the veins and membranes in their wings which are held flat over their body. Most lace bug species found in Ohio live on the lower leaf surface of their host plants.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Ants Cry Uncle!

The sight of ants in the kitchen can really freak you out. But if you step back, and do some research, they are not as big of a problem as you think.
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Authors
Thomas deHaas

Plant of the Week - Daylilies

Let's talk about a perennial plant that can provide early, mid and late season flowers, and ultimately color. There are distinct flower shapes and sizes. The overall plant height can vary greatly from 12 inches to exceeding 4 feet. They can be incorporated in existing perennial beds, or can stand alone in swaths and borders. The perennial I am talking about is the daylily. 
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Amy Stone

Adult Gypsy Moths Evident in Ohio

While the caterpillar stage of the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) and its feeding is a thing of the past, adult moth activity is now being observed in the buckeye state. Populations are not widespread, but rather most evident in pockets or areas within the supression zone. Ohio has three management zones including: suppression, slow-the-spread, and eradication.  Each of thoses zones or programs are described below. 
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Authors
Amy Stone