Turfgrass Times, 06.21.2019

Here is your link to the weekly video update (recorded on 06.21.2019) from the OSU Turfgrass Team. Updates are from Dr. David Shetlar, aka The Bug Doc; Dr. David Gardner; Dr. Ed Nangle; Dr. Pamela Sherratt; Joe Rimelspach; and Dr. Zane Raudenbush.
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Authors
Amy Stone

White-Marked Tussock Moth Caterpillar Outbreaks

Heavy localized populations of white-marked tussock moth caterpillars are being reported in central and western Ohio. Curtis Young (OSU Extension, Van Wert County) showed images during this week's BYGL Zoom Inservice of caterpillars on a variety of hosts including rose and noted he had received reports of hot spots in Allen, Hancock, and Putnam Counties. I received a report from Franklin County of 100% defoliation of a landscape redbud.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Blistered Oak Leaves

Oak leaf blister and oak leaf blister mites produce look-a-like symptoms early in the growing season. Light green to greenish-yellow irregularly-shaped bulging "blisters" rise from the upper leaf surface. An accurate diagnosis requires flipping the leaves over to look at the lower leaf surface.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Poison Hemlock and Wild Parsnip are going to Seed in Southern Ohio

Poison hemlock and wild parsnip are two of our nastiest non-native weeds found in Ohio. Poison hemlock can kill you while wild parsnip may make you wish you were dead. Both are commonly found growing together and continuously wet conditions caused both to flourish this growing season. The size of some infestations has been remarkable. Poison hemlock produces white flowers on stalks that create a more rounded look; perhaps a bit more like an umbrella.  Wild parsnip has intense yellow flowers with the stalks producing a more flat-topped appearance.
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Authors
Joe Boggs
Erik Draper

Crabs, Scab and then So Sad... Drab!

On the BYGL conference call, I shared that I am amazed at how the foliage of the greatest landscape small tree, the breathtaking crabapple, has remained relatively clean here in NE Ohio.  I was expecting with all of the rain this year, that we would quickly see what we Crabarians affectionately term “year of the scab dog”.  This “scab dog” effect is due to the fungal pathogen (Venturia inaequalis) causing extensive apple scab lesions on susceptible crabapple tree leaves.  Given our perfect environmental conditions for this fungal disease, I expected it to quickly...

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Authors
Erik Draper
Joe Boggs

Dogwoods Are Dazzling

While on our BYGL conference call, I shared the glorious status of Kousa dogwoods (Cornus kousa var. chinensis) right now in NE Ohio.  Only one word can describe them, “OUTSTANDING”!!  Then Joe Boggs from the southern reaches of the state, asked me to repeat what I said about the Kousa’s here.  I told him that they were just reaching their full glory and were unbelievable due to the cooler weather and moisture.

 

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Authors
Erik Draper

Periodical Cicada: Rounds 1 and 2

Brood VIII (Eight) of the 17-year periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) have made their presence known in parts of northeastern Ohio, western Pennsylvania, and the northern panhandle of West Virginia. As with past brood emergences, the overall geographical distribution is spotty; however, there are localized pockets with heavy cicada activity.
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Authors
Joe Boggs