Hort Shorts

Cold Weather Offers an Extension on Poison Hemlock Management

Our slowly developing spring is a real boon to us procrastinators. If you exercise caution by performing a close inspection of what lies beneath, there may still be time to make a non-selective herbicide application to control Poison Hemlock without wiping out preferred plants that have not yet sprung for spring.
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Joe Boggs
Distinctive Dogwoods Demand Discernment dehaas.2 Mon, 03/05/2018 - 13:56
Red twig or yellow twig dogwood! Who knew? When people think of dogwoods, they typically think of flowering dogwood or maybe Chinese dogwood. However, there is a whole world of dogwoods specifically selected for their twig color in the winter. Against the snow as a backdrop, they can be stunning.
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Thomas deHaas
Invasive Species Awareness Week - ORIENTAL BITTERSWEET - Invasive Species of the Day stone.91 Sat, 03/03/2018 - 10:39

Sometimes referred to as the "kudzu of the north", oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus) is a non-native species that continues to grow and spread in Ohio. The vine is popping up in our woods, fence rows, landscapes and places in between.

 

It is important to know that we do have American bittersweet (Celastrus scandens). It has more elliptical shaped leaves, rather than the rounded of the Oriental bittersweet. American bittersweet can also be distinguished from Oriental bittersweet by its leaves when they are just beginning to emerge from...

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Amy Stone
National Invasive Species Awareness Week - GYPSY MOTH - Invasive Species of the Day stone.91 Wed, 02/28/2018 - 12:15

We are going way back in time for this invasive species during the 2018 National Invasive Species Awareness Week. 

 

In the 1860's a French artist and amateur entomologist, Leopold Trouvelot, brought the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) to North America for what he thought was a good reason. He hoped to use the gypsy moth as the foundation for a silk industry in the United States. The "silk threads" of the gypsy moth did not prove to be a reliable source, and unfortunately the insect escaped Trouvelot’s Boston home-laboratory. 

 

The gyspy moth was ...

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Amy Stone

National Invasive Species Awareness Week - Japanese Knotweed - Invasive Species of the Day

I have noticed Japanese Knotweed (I've seen it listed as: Polygonum cuspidatum or Fallopia japonica or Reynoutria japonica) around the county the last few summers, so I chose it as Tuesday's  INVASIVE of the DAY for National Invasive Plant Awareness Week.

Japanese knotweed is a non-native erect, semi-woody perennial that can grow up to and likely beyond 10 feet tall and create dense stands when unchecked.  It was introduced, as so many invasives were, as an ornamental in the late 1800's and soon escaped the garden-scape and found its way into disturbed...

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Ashley Kulhanek

Wonderful Witchhazels Welcome Warmer Weather

Witchhazels….the forgotten wonder! The flowers are so small and dainty; you could miss them. However, the fragrance is heavenly. Which is why designers, landscapers and homeowner should put them close to an entryway or high traffic area. Since witchhazels flower anytime between mid-February through March, they can easily be missed.
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Thomas deHaas

Silver Maples Blooming Away

The Silver Maples, Acer saccharinum, in my neck of the woods are blooming.  February or not... feels like "spring" to me!

 

silver maple in bloom

 

 

Silver Maple trees are among the first to bloom in Ohio clocking in at 34 growing degree days (GDD) for first bloom and 42 GDD for full bloom.  I caught these photos at 51 GDD.  You can check your own location by visiting the OSU Phenology...

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Authors
Ashley Kulhanek