Articles

Hemlock Woolly Adegid – A 2019 update dehaas.2 Fri, 10/18/2019 - 08:51
In mid-October 2019, Jim Chatfield, Amy Stone, and Thomas deHaas attended the Central Appalachian Spruce Restoration Initiative (CASRI) to discuss conifer health, specifically, Canadian Hemlock (Tsuga Canadensis) and hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae) (HWA). HWA was first discovered in West Virginia in 1992.
Published on
Authors
Thomas deHaas
Jim Chatfield
Amy Stone

Weird Willow Galls

Willow Pinecone Galls are produced by the Willow Pinecone Gall Midge, Rabdophaga strobiloides (family Cecidomyiidae), to house, nourish, and protect a single fly larva (maggot) located deep within the gall. The elaborate structures bear a striking resemblance to a pine cone complete with faux seed scales.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Last Hurrah for Willow Sawfly

Kris Stone, Director of the Boone County Arboretum and horticulturist extraordinaire, texted images this past Friday of Willow Sawfly (Nematus ventralis) larvae chowing down on the leaves of a Dewystem Willow (Salix irrorata) in his home landscape. It was a reminder that although the plant pest season may be drawing to a close, it ain't over 'til it's over.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

The National Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) Eradication Program Scores a "Win"

Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) is potentially the most devastating non-native pest to have ever arrived in North America. The beetle kills trees belonging to 12 genera in 9 plant families. This includes all native maples, a preferred host. The ripple effect across many forest ecosystems also means the potential loss of plant and animal species dependent upon those ecosystems.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Workshop on Treating for Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (HWA) and Elongate Hemlock Scale (EHS)

Tom Macy (Forest Health Program Administrator, Division of Forestry, Ohio Department of Natural Resources) has organized a workshop on treatment options for two non-native invasive pests threatening hemlock in Ohio: hemlock Woolly Adelgid (HWA) and Elongate Hemlock Scale (EHS).
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Dave Shetlar

Fall Color may Indicate MORE than the approach of Autumn!

I received a call recently from Miguel Preza, the Integrated Pest Manager for a local nursery about the onset of early fall color. He said something very helpful, “If the tree or shrub looks different than the others, take a closer look. In a planting of red Maples Acer rubrum, a couple of trees were showing fall color ahead of the others. On closer inspection, the trees in color were infested with oyster shell scale.
Published on
Authors
Thomas deHaas

Bees love the SON!

Seven-son Flower draws hundreds of bees. In the fall we think of pollinators as mostly flowers and perennials. We can forget that trees are some of our most important pollinators. And one of the best in the fall is Seven-son Flower (Heptacodium miconioides)
Published on
Authors
Thomas deHaas

The Rise of Lazarus Lizards

So-called Lazarus Lizards were a topic in both a diagnostic walk-about and a meeting I was involved with last week. The lizard's common name is influenced by where you stand, literally. If you're an American herpetologist, you would call them European Wall Lizards. If you live in Europe, they are Common Wall Lizards. If you're a native Cincinnatian, you would likely call them Lazarus Lizards.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs