Flocculent Planthoppers Arise

Fulgoroid planthoppers (order Hemiptera, superfamily Fulgoroidea) are relatively small insects with the adults seldom measuring more than around 1/4" in length. The early instar nymphs (immatures) of many species congregate in groups, or "colonies," and are usually obscured by a dense cloak of tangled waxy, white, cotton-like "fluff."
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Off With Their Heads!

The peculiar handiwork of the sunflower headclipping weevil (Haplorhynchites aeneus) is just getting underway this season on purple coneflowers (Echinacea purpurea) and other members of the aster family (Asteraceae) in southwest Ohio. The damage includes dangling seed heads and stems that looked like soda straws.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Aster Yellows

Aster yellows is a serious, chronic disease that occurs throughout North America and may affect over 300 species of plants in 38 families including a number of vegetables such as carrots, potatoes, lettuce, endive, and artichokes. However, as its common name implies, aster yellows occurs most often on members of the aster family (Asteraceae) and coneflowers are particularly susceptible.
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Authors
Joe Boggs
Julie Crook

ODA Partners with OSU Extension to Provide Online Pesticide Recertification Opportunities

The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA), is partnering with the Ohio State University Extension Pesticide Safety Education Program (PSEP) to temporarily offer online recertification for pesticide applicators and fertilizer certificate holders whose licenses expired or are due to expire this year and were unable recertify as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.  The online recertification for private pesticide applicators and fertilizer certificate holders will be available starting Monday, July 6.  Commercial pesticide applicators will be able to recertify online beginning August 10.
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Authors
Jennifer Andon

Spotted Lanternfly Continues to Develop

While the spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) (SLF) has not been detected in Ohio, the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA), along with the Ohio State University (OSU) and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) are urging Ohioans to continue to be on the look-out for this invasive insect. Many are using the Great Lakes Early Detection Network (GLEDN) App to report tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima), a favorite food or host for this plant hopper, especially as an adult, and then revisiting the tree looking for signs and symptoms of SLF throughout the year.
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Authors
Amy Stone

Bad "Bugs"

Lace bugs (order Hemiptera; family Tingidae) are so-named because of the lace-like pattern of veins and membranes in their wings. Most lace bug species found trees in Ohio live on the lower leaf surface.
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Authors
Joe Boggs