Wilted Buckeye Leaves

A number of trees and shrubs in Ohio suffered frost/freeze damage this spring with symptoms ranging from blasted flowers to wilted, blackened leaves, to twig dieback. Wilted leaves on buckeyes may mimic frost/freeze damage, but a close look at the petioles will reveal the true culprit: the buckeye petiole borer.
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Joe Boggs
Hydrangea Leaftier: Oddball Plant Structures boggs.47@osu.edu Sat, 05/16/2020 - 10:33
The oddball "leaf-purse" handiwork hydrangea leaftier moth (Olethreutes ferriferana, family Tortricidae) caterpillars are appearing on wild and cultivated hydrangeas. While these leaf structures may look very odd, the damage appears to cause little harm to the overall health of affected plants.
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Joe Boggs

We Speak For The Knees?

Correction 5.20.20
An article published in the International Journal of Plant Sciences was brought to my attention by Bob Polomski, Ph.D., Extension Associate, Clemson University, indicating that Baldcypress knees do indeed function as pneumatophores.

See citation below for article text:

Martin, C. E., & Francke, S. K. (n.d.). Root aeration function of baldcypress knees (Taxodium distichum). International Journal of Plant Sciences176(2), 170–173...

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Paul Snyder

Woodland Wonders: Spring Ephemerals Sing the Blues

The spring ephemeral season is nearing its end in Northwest Ohio as the woodland trees and shrubs leaf out. Temperature largely dictates the pulse of when wildflowers bloom and fade on the forest floor. Our rather cool spring allowed dozens of white blossoms to linger for several weeks. These flowers are now mostly gone aside from a stray spring beauty here and there, replaced by a show of blue and purple blooms. Two warm, sunny days above 70°F pushed the fast-forward button on flowering last week.

These are the tail end of...

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Beth Scheckelhoff

Woodland Wonders: A Tale of Two Vines

 

Vines are trailing plants that use stems, tendrils or adventitious roots to help them “climb” up surfaces like walls, bricks, stone, plants and trees to reach new heights.  The curious nature of two vining plants – Virginia creeper and poison ivy - came to light this past week. Both plants are native, herbaceous perennial vines with compound leaves commonly found throughout the woodlands of Ohio. Often, they grow near one another or even intertwined on the same tree. Can you tell these two plants apart?

 

 

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Beth Scheckelhoff