Oak Bulletgalls are Rising

Dave Shetlar (Professor Emeritus, OSU Entomology) and I have recently observed newly developing oak rough bulletgalls in central and southwest Ohio, respectively. The galls are produced under the direction of the gall wasp Disholcaspis quercusmamma (family Cynipidae). We're also starting to see the gall's security detail, but more about that later.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Bagworm Season Drawing to a Close

This "bagworm season" which began in early June was marked by damaging localized infestations throughout Ohio. Images showing heavy defoliation from bagworms (Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis) were commonly shared during our weekly BYGL Zoom Inservices. Populations appeared to be higher than has been seen for several years.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Asian Jumping Worms a Threat to Gardens and Woodlands

As gardeners, we understand that earthworms are important allies in creating a soil ecosystem that is conducive to growing flowers, vegetables, turf, shrubs, trees or any type of plant. Deep dwelling earthworms such as common night crawlers create tunnels, which allow air and water to reach plant roots. Their castings, or excrement, help enrich the soil by adding nutrients such as phosphorous, calcium, nitrogen, and magnesium.
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Authors
Mike Hogan

Robber Fly Born Identities

I posted an Alert over the weekend about robber flies (family Asilidae). This family of highly proficient predatory flies includes so-called "giant robber flies" (genus Promachus). I had the mistaken belief that the most common member of the giant robber fly genus found in Ohio is P. rufipes (Fabricius), the so-called Red-Footed Cannibalfly. However, thanks to BYGL-reader Tim Turner, I learned that we have another giant in our midst that we must consider when snapping pictures for BYGL Alerts.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Spotted Lanternfly Update

The spotted lanternfly (SLF) (Lycorma delicatula) is an invasive planthopper first detected in eastern Pennsylvania in Berks County in 2014, and has since been detected in Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia. The map below was updated on August 14, 2020 and includes both individual finds of SLF with no infestation present (purple dots), and where SLF infestations are present (blue areas) - which means a reproducing population had been detected and multiple life-stages of the insect has been detected and confirmed. 
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Authors
Amy Stone

Ohio Victory Gardens - Let's Grow Ohio

Victory Gardens originated during World War I, an answer to a severe food shortage at the time. People were encouraged to find any usable space, plop in some seeds and contribute homegrown fruits, vegetables and herbs to the effort. The idea was wildly successful, growing an army of amateur gardeners and serving to boost morale and patriotism.
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Authors
Amy Stone
Pam Bennett