Goose No Fly Zone During Molting titchenell.4 Mon, 06/20/2016 - 13:08

At the end of June and into the first few weeks of July, something happens to Ohio's goose population. Homeowners that have been harassing (or scaring) geese off their property may notice that now, the geese just aren't flying away. There is a reason your property has become a no-fly zone - the adults are molting their flight feathers. This process takes a few weeks during which, the adults are unable to fly. Couple that with a clutch of young goslings that are not able to spread their wings yet, and you have several sitting ducks (or in this case, geese!). Unfortunately, damage (and the...

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Marne Titchenell
Sssssssnakes in the Garden titchenell.4 Mon, 06/20/2016 - 12:30

 

SSSSSSSSSNAKES IN THE GARDEN. It is not uncommon this time of year to encounter a slithery visitor in gardens, landscapes, and backyards. There are several species of snakes happy to live their lives in backyards, but one of the most common is the eastern gartern snake. Named for the 3 light stripes that run along the length of its black, brown, gray, or olive body, the garter snake is sometimes nicknamed the 'garden' snake because that is where unsuspecting gardeners often encounter them. The stripes running vertically along the length of the snake's body resemble the once...

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Marne Titchenell
BYGL Mail, Part Two: Week of June 13 chatfield.1@osu.edu Sat, 06/18/2016 - 23:50

More responses from bygl-alert readers:

3). Tom Holcomb wrote that: 

Our 80-year old plus parents have a gorgeous huge tulip poplar. Earlier it was full of blossoms. Squirrels have nipped most of them off.  They believed this is the first year that this is happened. Wondering if there is a reason/explanation for this?  

I do not know the answer, but one possibility is that this is due to the large amount of nectar produced by tuliptree (another name for tulip poplar) flowers. If so, their behavior is not so squirrely, after all.

 

4). ...

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Jim Chatfield

BYGL Mail, Part 1, Week of June 13

Below are a few selected bygl-alert user comments from mid-June.

1). Mary Beth Breckenridge wrote:

Read your cicada article in BYGL with interest. But have you eaten one?

I have not, but the outstanding writer and journalist Mary Beth, of northeast Ohio’s Beacon Journal newspaper has, and to prove it, go to:

 https://www.facebook.com/MBBreckABJ/videos/10154444348473296/

Collin Foltz,  a student in my OSU Sustainable Landscape Maintenance class this...

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Jim Chatfield
Purple-Flowered Raspberry chatfield.1@osu.edu Sat, 06/18/2016 - 11:57

The time of eating the woodsy fruits of raspberries is beginning, but the genus for raspberries and blackberries (Rubus) is not just for eating.  The purple-flowered raspberry (Rubus odoratus) is a small- to medium-sized (3 to 8 feet) native shrub in the rose family (Rosaceae).  In both woodlands (I saw it this week at Mohican State Park) and for landscapes this raspberry is a welcome sight. It has maple-like leaves (but alternate rather than opposite leaf arrangement) and sparse wine-like purple flowers. These flowers almost remind you, appropriately so, of – small wild...

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Jim Chatfield
Yellow Poplar Weevil on Tuliptree chatfield.1@osu.edu Sat, 06/18/2016 - 10:34

Yellow poplar weevil (Odontopus calceatus) is a snout beetle that causes mostly cosmetic damage on tuliptree (also known as yellow poplar and tulip poplar), sassafras, and certain magnolias. I noted damage on tuliptree this past week while also noting developing cicada tree flagging also occurring on tuliptree. Damage on tuliptree leaves includes little bean-shaped scar-like pits in leaves due to epidermal feeding by the weevil adults and larger leaf blotch mines by the weevil larvae. Damage is usually just cosmetic, but in outbreaks may result is a scorched appearance to the...

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Jim Chatfield
Where Have All The Maple Seedlings Gone? chatfield.1@osu.edu Wed, 06/15/2016 - 17:36

Many have noted this Spring that there are not as many red maple (Acer rubrum) seedlings popping up in flower beds. This was illustrated for me this past Saturday (June 11) when crossing the footbridge adjacent to the B & O Harmar Bridge, spanning the Muskingum River from Marietta proper to Harmar Village in southern Ohio.  I visited this bridge for the first time on June 21, 2013 and at the time took a picture then of the many red maple seedlings sprouting from the wooden railroad ties of the railroad bridge. This year, almost nada for red maple seedlings.  

 

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Jim Chatfield
Cicadaville chatfield.1@osu.edu Wed, 06/15/2016 - 12:57

If you look at a map of the emergence of Brood V of the 17-year cicadas, Magicicada septendecim (what a great name!), for example at cicadamania.com, it looks like almost the entire eastern half of Ohio was destined for the same experience. As we know by now, though, it is not one size fits all. Go to the OSU Mansfield Campus and the cacophony is big-time, go to Wooster and it is the late spring quietude, until dog-day cicadas, which we hear every year arrive later in the summer. Twenty miles south at Mohican State Park and the male cicadas choir is signing in noticeable numbers....

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Jim Chatfield
ODA Annouces Gypsy Moth Mating Disruption Treatments In Central Ohio stone.91@osu.edu Tue, 06/14/2016 - 22:20

On Tuesday, June 14, 2016 the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) announced that they will begin aerial treatments designed to disrupt gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) mating this summer in central Ohio. 

 

The gypsy moth is a non-native species that feeds on more than 300 different trees and shrubs, and is especially fond of oaks (Quercus spp.) while in its devastating caterpillar stage.  While healthy plants can usually withstand one or two years of defoliation, repeat feeding injury coupled with a drought or other pest pressures, can cause host plant ...

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Amy Stone
Nutrient Deficiency Case Study on Colorado Blue Spruce boggs.47@osu.edu Tue, 06/14/2016 - 18:20

While BYGL Alerts are intended to provide fast-hitting information, sometimes it's important for us to take a little more time - and space - to dig deeper.  Our Southwest Ohio Diagnostic Walk-About group visited Stanley Rowe Arboretum yesterday and revisited an interesting nutrient deficiency problem that was observed by the group on Colorado blue spruce during our Walk-About last year.

...

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Joe Boggs