Mining Bees on the Wing

There are many species of bees that create individual (solitary) burrows in the soil. Several hymenopteran families are represented including Andrenidae (Mining Bees), Apidae (Tribe Anthophorini (Digger Bees)), and Colletidae which are called cellophane bees owing to the waterproof plastic-like material they use to line their soil burrows. They all have one thing in common: they are important pollinators.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Tigers on the Prowl

I spotted one of my favorite insect predators darting about on forest trails yesterday: Six-Spotted Tiger Beetles. Their common name is well justified as these tiny "tigers" hunt, kill, and eat other insects. They are equipped with huge eyes for excellent eyesight, long legs for agile speed, and huge mandibles for grabbing prey.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Browned Boxwoods

Boxwoods with light brown to golden brown leaves are common this spring in Greater Cincinnati. Some of the leaf browning is due to winter injury; some was caused by salt damage. However, a close examination may also reveal the telltale blister-like leaf symptoms caused by the boxwood leafminer.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Watch Your ASH!

Now that the Emerald Ash Borer has infested Lake County, Ohio, many Green Ash trees in the landscape and forest woodlots have died. But the real danger is right overhead. With dead trees and wind combided, it can be a costly and deadly combination. A tree that shows severe infestation will die within the year. The danger is these trees soon become a fall hazard and need to be removed before injury or property damage occurs.
Published on
Authors
Thomas deHaas

They're Baaack!

Last Friday, Larry Parker (Cincinnati Parks) sent to me the images below of Boxelder Bugs (Boisea trivittata, order Hemiptera) hanging out on a park's building. 'Tis the season.
Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs

Managing Crabgrass in Turf

With these rains the lawn is beginning to grow and the weeds are not far behind.  Some of the earliest emerging broadleaf weeds have begun to emerge.  The biggest problem with weeds in turfgrass is reduced aesthetic value, although some weeds can out compete turfgrass when management is reduced.  Smooth and large crabgrass, yellow foxtail, and annual bluegrass are the most frequent annual grass weeds in turfgrass.
Published on
Authors
Jeff Stachler