Last Hurrah for Catalpa Hornworms

Participants in the Greater Cincinnati BYGLive! Diagnostic Walk-About held this past Monday in the Boone County Arboretum (Union, KY) viewed second-generation Catalpa Hornworms (Ceratomia catalpae) enjoying a last hurrah before pupating this season. Their discovery led to a discussion on host preference, parasitoids, and a virus spun out of a wasp's genome
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Venomous Caterpillars

Participants in last week's Ohio Plant Diagnostic Workshop looked at but didn't touch, the Smaller Parasa (Parasa chloris). They kept their distance because the deceptively named caterpillar packs a venomous punch that's far from small. As with many creatures in Nature (e.g. crocodilians, mamba snakes, grizzly bears, etc.); these caterpillars should not be handled.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Say Hello to My Little Friends

Participants at last week's Ohio Plant Diagnostic Workshop in Secrest Arboretum (OSU OARDC) viewed the round, pointed galls produced by the Oak Rough Bulletgall Wasp on its namesake host. They also observed – at a distance – the buzzing security detail protecting the immature gall wasps developing within the galls.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Redheads Roll

This is the third BYGL Alert! this season that focuses on Fall Webworm (Hyphantria cunea). This Alert is in response to the numerous e-mail reports I've received of spectacularly large silk nests occurring in southwest Ohio. They are most likely the work of the red-headed fall webworm biotype.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Check Trees for ALB

August is the height of summer, and it is also the best time to spot the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) as it starts to emerge from trees. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is asking the public to take five minutes to step outside and report any signs of this invasive pest. Checking trees for the beetle will help residents protect their own trees and better direct USDA’s efforts to eradicate this beetle from the United States.
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Authors
Amy Stone

The Bagworm Season is in the Bag

The vast majority of Common Bagworm caterpillars in southwest Ohio have initiated their annual "tie-off" in preparation for pupation. Bags are tightly closed and tied with silk to a twig or other anchorage point. Likewise, male bagworms in the northwest part of the state have tied-off; however, some female caterpillars are continuing to feed.
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Authors
Joe Boggs
Curtis E. Young