Spot the Spot – Efforts Continue to Look For Spotted Lanternfly (SLF) in Ohio

Recently, an Ohioan returned from a road trip to Pennsylvania. In addition to all the memories made, this traveler unintentionally brought back a hitch-hiker – a spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) (SLF). The individual quickly captured and ended the insect’s life before reaching out to his local Extension Educator. The suspect sample was submitted to the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) for confirmation based on the USDA protocol established to confirm non-native pests not currently established, or with limited presence in the case of Asian Longhorned beetle, in the state.
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Authors
Amy Stone
Thomas deHaas

Weaving the Dodder's Tale

Dodders are parasitic plants belonging to the morning glory family, Convolvulaceae. They were formerly placed in the dodder family, Cuscutaceae, with only one genus in the family, Cuscuta. Depending on the reference, there are somewhere between 100 – 170 species worldwide with 13 species reportedly found in Ohio.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Oak Bulletgalls are Rising

Dave Shetlar (Professor Emeritus, OSU Entomology) and I have recently observed newly developing oak rough bulletgalls in central and southwest Ohio, respectively. The galls are produced under the direction of the gall wasp Disholcaspis quercusmamma (family Cynipidae). We're also starting to see the gall's security detail, but more about that later.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Bagworm Season Drawing to a Close

This "bagworm season" which began in early June was marked by damaging localized infestations throughout Ohio. Images showing heavy defoliation from bagworms (Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis) were commonly shared during our weekly BYGL Zoom Inservices. Populations appeared to be higher than has been seen for several years.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Asian Jumping Worms a Threat to Gardens and Woodlands

As gardeners, we understand that earthworms are important allies in creating a soil ecosystem that is conducive to growing flowers, vegetables, turf, shrubs, trees or any type of plant. Deep dwelling earthworms such as common night crawlers create tunnels, which allow air and water to reach plant roots. Their castings, or excrement, help enrich the soil by adding nutrients such as phosphorous, calcium, nitrogen, and magnesium.
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Authors
Mike Hogan