Elms with Holey Leaves

The holy handiwork of the Elm Flea Weevil (Orchestes steppensis) is evident on native, non-native, and hybrid elms in southwest Ohio. Holes in elm leaves result from the adult “snout beetles” feeding on the leaves as well as the larvae tunneling between the upper and lower leaf surfaces as leafminers.
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Joe Boggs

There’s Corn in My Lawn!

I received a phone call yesterday from a homeowner proclaiming, “there’s corn coming up in my lawn!” I asked if the lawn was newly seeded and the caller said it was not; the lawn had been established several years ago. It’s a useful question because wheat is notorious for springing up from errant seed in straw used to cover turf seed.
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Joe Boggs

Be Alert to Magnolia Scale

Magnolia scale is a type of "soft scale" so named because the females are hidden beneath a helmet-like soft leathery covering that provides limited protection. Soft scales can be squashed! This native insect is one of the largest soft scales found in Ohio with mature females measuring as much as 1/2" in diameter. The size and overall shape of mature magnolia scale females commonly make it a poster child for soft scales.
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Joe Boggs

Gypsy Moth Damage Becoming Evident

Gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) caterpillars are becoming evident in areas where populations are present. Citizens are reaching out to local Extension offices to identify the caterpillar and determine what is the best course of action.

 

The caterpillars are voracious feeders and as their numbers build, their appetites expand and plant foliage disappears rather quickly. While they prefer oaks, their host preferences are quite expansive. They seem to enjoy the needles of spruce, especially as larger, or later instar caterpillars.

 

Wisconsin has a "...

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Amy Stone

Turfgrass Times, 06.15.2021

Tune and watch the latest Turfgrass Times from the OSU Turf Team. This week's video includes updates from Todd Hicks, Dr. Pamela Sherratt, Dr. Dave Gardner, and Dr. Ed Nangle. Updates include: diseases, weather, weeds, overseeding and more. 
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Amy Stone

Maple Leaf Blister

Last month, I received an email message from a Lucas County resident that was noticing leaf drop on some maples in her neighborhood. Of course, the diagnostic process immediately begins, and my mind automatically goes to the OSU FactSheet, and I start going through the series of questions. If you aren't familiar with the FactSheet, or need a refresher, this resource is laid out in a order that takes you through the diagnostic process. 
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Amy Stone

Turfgrass Times, 06.04.2021

Last Friday, members of the OSU Turfgrass Team gathered to share their expertise in the latest Turfgrass Times You Tube video. Reports from Dr. David Gardner, Dr. David Shetlar (aka the BugDoc), and Dr. Ed Nangle. Dr. Gardner shared a weed update, including management options, and made mention of red thread. Dr. Shetlar discussed insects including: cicadas, May / June beetles, white grubs, and adult craneflies. Dr. Nangle talked about the weather, soil temperatures and mentioned some up coming educational opportunities. 
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Amy Stone

Holey Oak Leaves

The oak shothole leafminer is a small fly belonging to the family Agromyzidae; the leaf miner flies. The leafminer produces four progressive symptoms: small pinprick-like holes, larger holes, dark brown "blotch mines," and ragged-looking leaves with missing pieces.
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Joe Boggs