Elm Yellows: The Re-Emergence of an Old Killer

Jim Chatfield and I visited the USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station, in Delaware, OH, on Monday where they are waging a battle to eliminate Elm Yellows (EY) from their American Elm Restoration Project research plots.  I last saw the disease in southwest Ohio in 2013. 

The problem is that American elms (Ulmus americana) that are resistant to Dutch Elm Disease (DED) have no known resistance to Elm Yellows (EY).  DED is caused by a fungal infection; EY is caused by a phytoplasma which is a type of bacterium.  DED fungi plug the xylem.  The EY phytoplasma...

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Authors
Joe Boggs
Jim Chatfield

One Month Early! Gray Leaf Spot on Perennial Ryegrass Alert

Gray Leaf Spot has been confirmed on perennial ryegrass in Ohio! On Friday July 29, 2016 two cases of the disease were confirmed in the Clinic. This is at least a month earlier than normally detected in Ohio. Both cases were in central Ohio and at sites that have had a history of the disease. This can be a very destructive disease to ryegrass, both annual and perennial. To date this is only a serious disease on ryegrasses in the Midwest.
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Nancy J. Taylor

A Mitey Big Disaster

Often, one of the typical options offered when attempting to control an identified pest, is to simply do nothing!  In this year of extremely hot, dry conditions in NE Ohio, deciding to not do anything about a pest, turned into a disaster.  The pest involved was the two-spotted spider mite, which was happily feeding on tomatoes growing in a high tunnel.

 

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Erik Draper

Joe-Pye Weed

Many people think Joe-Pye weed (Eutrochium purpureum)is nothing more than a roadside weed and have never taken in to consideration its outstanding ornamental characteristics.  It is a large plant which needs space, but when planted in mass it can provide exceptional flowering and provide height when needed in the landscape.
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Julie Crook

Lily Has Everyone Seeing Stars

Every year in NE Ohio at the Drapescape, my wife and I anticipate being able to sit out on our deck and gaze upon the stars in the middle of the day.  How is this possible you ask?  Easily answered.  Because we are both enjoying the emergence of our favorite oriental hybrid lily, which is in bloom right now, called Lilium orientalis ‘Stargazer’ or commonly known as the Stargazer lily.

 

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Erik Draper

Emerald Ash Borer Update

 

While on our BYGL Conference Call earlier today, I received the monthly Emerald Ash Borer email update which includes a map that includes the latest changes of EAB detections in North America.  A shout out to Douglas Bopp, GIS Support Northeast Area with USDA APHIS PPQ who regularly sends this information out to communicate the latest information. 

 

Changes and/or additions included in this map since the July 1, 2016 map are as follows: The addition of initial county detections in: Vanderburgh County, IN; Harrison, Van Buren and Washington Counties,...

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Amy Stone

Hibiscus Hyperventilation!

As I was driving through a local neighborhood this morning, I stopped at a stop sign and as I started to pull through the intersection, I saw massive, pink blooms that had me hyperventilating!  The sun was just at the right angle that the Hibiscus moscheutos (a.k.a. Hardy Hibiscus, Rose or Swamp Mallow), just popped out of a drab seeming lifeless, dry landscape!  I couldn’t resist that vibrant splash of color so I had to drive around the block, park, walk nonchalantly along the sidewalk and then casually slip into the yard to get a picture, without getting bitten by a dog!

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Erik Draper

Spider Mite Problems Just Keep Coming!

While finally getting around to mulching my perennial beds this weekend, I noticed more spider mite damage on one of my species of Hosta. I am not sure which cultivar it is as it's one that was handed down from generation to generation. i love it because it has beautiful fragrant flowers, but this weekend the foliage was looking a little rough and spotted.
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Pam Bennett

Milkweeds: Asclepias and Asclepius

  I was moved by my friend Joe Boggs post about oleander aphids on milkweeds (Asclepias spp.) to add a little to the mix, mainly because I wrote earlier about butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa) and because I took a number of pictures of milkweeds in the past few weeks and in previous years. They are quite beautiful with their reflexed corolla (group of petals) and elaborate horn and hood structures, their silky fibers (coma) used for life preserver flotation in World War II and pillows and comforters today, and for their relationship with Monarch butterflies.

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Jim Chatfield