Seasonal Needle Drop in Full Swing

I received a phone call yesterday from an Ohio landowner asking what was "killing" his Eastern white pine trees. Coincidentally, I was driving past a row of white pines with several trees looking pretty ragged owing to their normal shedding of inner needles at this time of the year. Although normal, it can sometimes be dramatically synchronous with all of the inner needles turning reddish-brown at once.
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Joe Boggs

Angel Trumpets Sound

During a recent visit to Kingwood Center Gardens in Mansfield, I was treated to Angel Trumpets in bloom. These summer-fall bloomers make for spectacular late season WOW! For Ohio growers, these are tropical and frost tender. They would need to be brought in each winter as Kingwood Center does, however a big pot and some TLC might be worth it for these show-stoppers.

 

Angel’s Trumpets, Brugmansia spp., are woody shrubs or small trees with large pendulous flowers. These huge trumpet-shaped flowers in total can be a foot long and come in white, yellow, orange, red or...

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Ashley Kulhanek
An Introduction to the Pawpaw Experience boggs.47 Sat, 09/23/2017 - 12:58
My wife tasted her first pawpaw fruit yesterday which is hard to believe since she's been married to a native West Virginian for over 30 years. She loved it … the fruit; her West Virginian remains a day-to-day challenge.
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Joe Boggs
Revisiting Some Scaly Old Friends boggs.47 Fri, 09/22/2017 - 12:33
I spotted some "old friends" yesterday scurrying over the rock walls, on the sidewalks, and in the landscaping at the Civic Garden Center of Greater Cincinnati. If you're a herpetologist, you would call my "friends" European wall lizards. However, if you're a native Cincinnatian, you would likely identify these non-native lizards as "Lazarus lizards."
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Joe Boggs
Rachised Over The Coals chatfield.1 Fri, 09/22/2017 - 09:11

  Yesterday, I did a profile (https://bygl.osu.edu/node/924) of the lovely shining or winged sumac (Rhus copallinum) that include the following statement: “The wings on the stems are cool. BYGL-alert readers were true to their calling. Alarum Alarum, Alert Alert. Within minutes, John Swintosky of Louisville and Fred Robinson of northeast Ohionproperly and politely responded with corrections.

 

  John Swintosky e-mailed: The "winged stem" noted is better called winged rachis,...

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Jim Chatfield
Shining Sumac: A Shrub For Any Week chatfield.1 Thu, 09/21/2017 - 07:00

  Earlier this week, I visited Charles Tubesing, Plant Collections Curator of Holden Arboretum along with Joe Cochran, Director of Secrest Arboretum. Much more on that later, but for now I simply must push out a Shrub of Any Week shout-out for a native sumac: shining or winged sumac, Rhus copallinum (this specific epithet, instead of copallina seems to be preferred).

 

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Jim Chatfield
Fire Blight and Ornamental Pear, Good or Bad? dehaas.2 Wed, 09/20/2017 - 12:24
So this predicament begs to ask the question; is a pathogen on a potential invasive plant ‘Friend’ or ‘Foe’?
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Thomas deHaas
Perennial Plant of the Week - Leopard Plant stone.91 Tue, 09/19/2017 - 20:15

Do you have a shade garden? Are you looking for a fall blooming yellow flower with large leaves? Leopard plant (Ligularia dentata 'Othello') might be just the plant to consider. This herbaceous perennial is best grown in a humusy soil that is rich in organic matter. It preference is a medium to wet site that is in part shade to full shade. It is imperative that the site never fully dries out. Because of the need for moisture, this plant will benefit from a regular, deep watering during the summer, especially when temperature are high and Mother-Nature hasn't...

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Amy Stone

Along Came a Spider

Ohioans may be surprised by the large number of spiders living near at hand when heavy morning dews accentuate their gossamer creations. Their conspicuous web-work can be striking when highlighted by early morning sunlight along roadways.
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Joe Boggs