Antlions Roar Again!

The last time I saw a sizable collection of pit-trapping antlions (Myrmeleon immaculatus, family Myrmeleontidae) in southwest Ohio was in 2017. The conical pits created by one of my favorite insects have been a rarity since then. That’s why I was thrilled to come across large numbers of pits today in Sharon Woods which is part of Great Parks of Hamilton County in the southwest part of the state.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Act Now to Prevent Fall Invaders!

It won't be long before fall home-invading insects start appearing on our doorsteps in search of winter quarters. The unwelcomed guests may include Boxelder Bugs; Western Conifer Seed Bugs; and Magnolia Seed Bugs. Of course, the two most notorious fall marauders are the Multicolored Asian Lady Beetles and Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs. These non-natives have a deserved reputation for invading homes in huge numbers.
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Authors
Joe Boggs
Goldenrain Tree Bug boggs.47@osu.edu Thu, 09/24/2020 - 15:53
I came across a small population of Goldenrain Tree Bugs (Jadera haematoloma) this week cavorting beneath their namesake host in a southwest Ohio landscape. The bugs do not have a common name that's been approved by the Entomological Society of America.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

A Million Maximilian Sunflower Display

A beautiful floral display is underway in the Voice of America (VOA) Butler County MetroPark just off I-75 north of Cincinnati. The draw for me and apparently many others is a sea of gorgeous yellow flowers running for about 1/2 mile between the park's lake and Liberty Way; a road that borders the northern edge of the park. The display is a show-stopper!
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Stinging Cats

Most hairy caterpillars do not represent a threat, but some caterpillars have hairs or bristles that are modified for defense. They can produce itchy rashes or deliver a painful venomous sting. There are good reasons to look but not touch.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Spot the Spot – Efforts Continue to Look For Spotted Lanternfly (SLF) in Ohio

Recently, an Ohioan returned from a road trip to Pennsylvania. In addition to all the memories made, this traveler unintentionally brought back a hitch-hiker – a spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) (SLF). The individual quickly captured and ended the insect’s life before reaching out to his local Extension Educator. The suspect sample was submitted to the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) for confirmation based on the USDA protocol established to confirm non-native pests not currently established, or with limited presence in the case of Asian Longhorned beetle, in the state.
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Authors
Amy Stone
Thomas deHaas