“Pine Cones” Rise on Willows

Willow Pinecone Galls, with their faux seed scales, bear a striking resemblance to pine cones, particularly when the galls darken during the winter. Of course, pine cones don’t occur on angiosperms, only on gymnosperms. And, a close examination will expose the pine cone ruse with the galls covered in fine hairs; pine cones aren’t hairy.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Coneflower Rosette Mite: Tufted Seed Heads are on the Rise

Tufted flower parts that rise rosette-like from coneflower cones are symptoms of an eriophyid mite (family Eriophyidae) that has yet to be taxonomically categorized, so it has no scientific name or approved common name. However, the mite is generally referred to as the Coneflower Rosette Mite based on the damage that it causes to coneflowers.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

A Kissing Bug in Ohio: Don’t Panic!

This past week, the Kissing Bug Triatoma sanguisuga was identified from images sent to OSU Entomology from a resident in Warren County and to OSU Extension, Butler County, from a resident in that county. This kissing bug was given the approved common name of Bloodsucking Conenose by the Entomological Society of America (ESA).
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Why Are My Apples Falling Off?

This is the time of year that is both disappointing and exhilarating for any fruit grower because of the phenomenon called “June drop”.  It is disappointing because of what you thought would be your best apple crop and your dreams of apple crisps and pies galore… suddenly begins to drop off the tree.  But it’s okay because as a fruit grower, you know that most fruit trees will produce many more blooms than are actually needed by the tree to produce a full fruit load.

 

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Authors
Erik Draper

Ash “Broccoli” Galls

The bizarre-looking Ash Inflorescence (flower) Galls produced by the eriophyid mite, Aceria fraxiniflora (Syn. Eriophyes fraxiniflora) (family Eriophyidae) are gracing ash trees in Ohio. The growths consist of variably sized clusters of distorted flower parts.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Wild Parsnip: Too Late to Control, Not Too Late To Identify

Wild Parsnip (Pastinaca sativa L., family Apiaceae (previously Umbelliferae)) is in full bloom in Ohio with recent hot temperatures accelerating seed development, particularly in the southern part of the state. This means it’s too late to reduce the seed bank of this highly dangerous non-native invasive weed by targeting flowering plants with herbicides.
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Authors
Joe Boggs