Lesser Celandine is on the Rise

Lesser Celandine plants are starting to rise in southern Ohio. This non-native is known as a "spring ephemeral" owing to the time of year when the short-lived plants and flowers are present. The majority of this weed's hide-and-seek life-cycle is spent hidden from view as underground tubers.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

National Invasive Species Awareness Week, February 25 - March 3, 2019

Today, February 25, 2019 kicks-off National Invasive Species Awareness Week! While meetings, programs, and events are scheduled in Washington DC, we can use the week as a way to raise awareness right here in the buckeye state. Please share this alert with your colleagues, clients, friends and family to help spread the word about invasive species. 
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Authors
Amy Stone

Cold Temperatures Blow Into The Buckeye State

I think it is safe to say everyone is watching the weather forecast, specifically the bone-chilling temperatures that are making their way towards Ohio. Temperatures are predicted to be below zero and falling into the double digits beginning this evening (01.29.2019) through Thursday (01.31.2019). Wind chills are expected to be in the negative twenties, and could reach the negative forties depending upon location.
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Authors
Amy Stone

Open Comment Period Following New Additions to the OIPC Invasive Plant List

The Ohio Invasive Plant Council (OIPC) recently released information on the assessment of 9 new plant species for inclusion on their list of invasive plants. With this announcement also begins a 6-month public comment period for the new additions to the list.  Comments, suggestions or questions during this period should be directed to Theresa Culley (theresa.culley@uc.edu).  
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Authors
Amy Stone
Joe Boggs

ODA Announces 2019 Gypsy Moth Open Houses

The gypsy moth is a non-native pest that feeds on leaves and needles of over 300 different trees in the buckeye state. The feeding injury occurs in the spring and early summer when populations are present. The early season feeding, when heavy, causes the plants to push new leaves that ultimately are the food-factories for the rest of the year. Healthy deciduous trees can usually recover as long as there isn't repeat defoliation year after year. Evergreens can die in a single season. 
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Authors
Amy Stone

Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire...

 

 

A diagnostic sample this week had me thinking about this yuletide carol.  A visitor brought a bowl of chestnuts to the Extension Office this week.  This tree has been producing for many years, but the nuts within never fill out into the round tasty treats associated with the holidays.  What is going on?

 

 

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Authors
Ashley Kulhanek