Twisted Leaves Rock American Elms

The odd-looking leaf-twisting handiwork of Woolly Apple Aphids (Eriosoma lanigerum) is becoming evident on newly emerging leaves of American elms (Ulmus americana, ‘Princeton’) in southwest Ohio. ‘Princeton’ is an old cultivar first propagated by Princeton Nursery in New Jersey in 1922. The cultivar was later found to be resistant to the fungal pathogens behind Dutch Elm Disease (DED).
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Authors
Joe Boggs
New FactSheet - Native Trees: Creating Living Landscapes for Birds, Butterflies, Bees and Other Beneficials stone.91@osu.edu Thu, 05/04/2023 - 16:46
Be sure to check out a new Ohio State University Extension's FactSheet entitled, Native Trees: Creating Living Landscape for Birds, Butterflies, Bees and Other Beneficials. This FactSheet can be found online on the Ohioline website at: https://ohioline.osu.edu/ Or, the direct link to the FactSheet is: https://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/hyg-5815
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Amy Stone

Roly-Poly Galls are Rolling Along

The ball-like Roly-Poly galls, produced under the direction of the gall wasp, Dryocosmus quercuspalustris (family Cynipidae), are one of the most unusual galls found on oaks in Ohio. The hollow galls are around 1/2" in diameter and reflect the colors of newly expanding leaves. Indeed, the gall-wasps hijack leaf tissue to form their galls.
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Joe Boggs
Sticky, Dripping Maples boggs.47@osu.edu Tue, 05/02/2023 - 15:49
Late last week, I came across plantings of red maples (Acer rubrum) in a commercial landscape in southwest Ohio that were dripping sticky, sugary, honeydew; the calling card of phloem-sucking insects. A close look revealed the trees were festooned with Calico Scale (Eulecanium cerasorum) and European Fruit Lecanium (Parthenolecanium corni).
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Joe Boggs

Miner Bees are Major Pollinators. So, Bee Nice.

The majority of bee species nest below ground with around 70% excavating their own nests. Indeed, nesting in the ground is considered the ancestral nesting behavior of all bees. Although there may be some “ground rules” regarding how we refer to these solitary bees, I’m never certain if we should call them, “ground-nesting,” “soil mining,” or something else.
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Joe Boggs