The Great Grub Switcheroo boggs.47@osu.edu Thu, 06/23/2016 - 22:13

Northern Masked Chafer (Cyclocephala borealis) and Southern Masked Chafer (C. lurida) adults are appearing around porchlights at night in southern Ohio.  It is common for people to assume that white grubs found beneath turfgrass in Ohio are Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica) grubs.  This is no longer a safe bet.  Japanese beetles have largely been replaced by these two chafers as the dominant "white grub producing" beetles in many areas of Ohio including the southern part of the state.  Indeed, I asked an experienced lawn care company last season to collect...

Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Oak Lace Bug Stippling Damage Whitens White Oak Leaves boggs.47@osu.edu Thu, 06/23/2016 - 22:06

I received several images of white oak leaves from a homeowner who wanted to know why the leaves appeared bleached.  The culprit was Oak Lace Bug (Corythucha arcuata).  This lace bug lives on the undersides of oak leaves where they use their piercing/sucking mouth parts to suck juices from the leaves.  As with all lace bugs, their feeding produces tiny yellow or whitish leaf spots (stippling) that may coalesce to produce large, white patches on the upper leaf surface.  Eventually, the damage becomes yellow-to-copper colored and the overall damage can produce early leaf drop....

Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
White Pine Weevil Damage is Becoming Evident boggs.47@osu.edu Thu, 06/23/2016 - 21:59

White pine weevil (Pissodes strobi) larval feeding damage is now becoming very evident in southern Ohio.  This means that localized weevil populations may be reduced by removing and destroying infested conifer terminals.  Overwintered females deposit eggs in early spring in the terminals of a wide range of conifers including Douglas-fir, all spruces, as well as Scotch, jack, red, pitch, and eastern white pines.  After the eggs hatch, the resulting white, legless, slightly curved, grub-like larvae tunnel downward just beneath the bark feeding on phloem tissue until pupation.  The...

Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Translucent Oak Galls boggs.47@osu.edu Thu, 06/23/2016 - 21:54

One of my all-time favorite plant galls is the appropriately named Translucent Oak Gall.  The galls are produced by the gall-wasp, Amphibolips nubilipennis (family Cynipidae).  They arise from a leaf vein on the lower leaf surface and measure around 1/2 - 3/4" in diameter.  Their shape and color causes them to strongly resemble tiny, pink balloons or pink grapes hanging beneath the leaves of red, scarlet, and black oaks. 

...

Published on
Authors
Joe Boggs
Orange Rust on Thornless Blackberries draper.15@osu.edu Wed, 06/22/2016 - 22:20

Recently in Northeast Ohio, the fungal disease known as Orange Rust is beginning to rear its unique, but strange symptoms on brambles, which are also known as cane berries.  Specifically, this fungus most often infects black and purple raspberries and sometimes is found on thornless blackberries, but is not known to infect red raspberries.

For me personally, this is the first time in my 24 years as an Extension Educator, that I have seen this disease on thornless blackberries.  Most often, this fungus is evident on either thorned blackberries or purple raspberries.  It is...

Published on
Authors
Erik Draper

Maple: Not Anthracnose

On June 18 I sent a byglalert about maple anthracnose diagnosed earlier this spring. The plant disease symptoms (see below) for that byglalert item included discolored blotches on the foliage which coalesced along leaf veins. The sample above for this alert today, sent from OSU Extension in Morrow County, show symptoms of leaf discoloration between the veins. This is the classic difference between physiological leaf scorch (this case) and anthracnose fungal disease (the previous case). The difference is all in the details. Physiological leaf scorch can be caused by many...

Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
All In chatfield.1@osu.edu Wed, 06/22/2016 - 12:36
This past Sunday: Before and After The Game. Note there are more trees!
Published on
Authors
Jim Chatfield
SAVE THE DATE - 89th Annual Green Industry Short Course stone.91@osu.edu Tue, 06/21/2016 - 15:49

Save these Dates - December 5, 6, 7 and 8, 2016!

 

The 89th Annual OSU Green Industry Short Course is partnering the Ohio Turfgrass Foundation (OTF) to present cutting-edge education on a wide range of horticultural topics at the Greater Columbus Convention Center.  Four days of amazing programming  includes a  pre-conference session called  Trees on Tap on December 5th.  Don't miss this opportunity for networking, up-to-date information and continuing education credits.  Mark your calendars and  save December 5, 6, 7 and 8th now and we will send you updates on the...

Published on
Authors
Denise Johnson
Gypsy Moth Caterpillars Continue to Munch in NW Ohio stone.91@osu.edu Tue, 06/21/2016 - 15:07

See-through-trees?  What could it be? 

 

Upon closer inspection of this building's foundation planting in Toledo, Ohio, the crabapple and beech trees were being fed upon by gypsy moth catepillars.  It appears they began their feeding frenzy on the crabapple, and once those leaves were eaten, they quickly moved out and began feeding on the beech trees on either side.  What you don't see in the photo are several spruce trees that are also a caterpillar favorite.  The tree that was missing at this location and is the caterpillar's favorite, is the oak.  But even without its...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone
Even in Scarlet and Gray country, these Maize and Blue planes are welcome stone.91@osu.edu Tue, 06/21/2016 - 14:31

This is a Media Release from the Ohio Department of Agriculture, Brett Gates, Deputy Communication Director . 

 

As Columbus commuters and residents go about their routines on Tuesday, June 21, they are likely to notice these yellow airplanes gracing the skies of the capital city:

 

The Ohio Department of Agriculture wants to make folks aware that these airplanes are fighting back against the gypsy moth, a pest that can wreak havoc on over 300 different types of our trees and shrubs while feeding on their foliage. The gypsy moth has been such a pest...

Published on
Authors
Amy Stone