Fall Webworm Nests

Overwintered fall webworm (Hyphantria cunea) eggs have hatched in southwest Ohio and first-generation nests are becoming noticeable. Look for these hairy caterpillars inside small silk nests enveloping just a few leaves. The nests will rapidly expand over the next few weeks to include more leaves and become far more evident.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Olethreutes has Left the Building

The Hydrangea Leaftier Moth (Olethreutes ferriferana, family Tortricidae) is so-named because the caterpillars tie together developing leaves on wild and cultivated hydrangeas to produce oddball “leaf-purse” structures. The caterpillars have completed their development in southwest Ohio but their handiwork remains.
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Joe Boggs

Yucca (Yucky?) Bugs and Beetles

I've long admired yucca (Yucca spp., family Asparagaceae) but realize many do not share my enthusiasm for these agave cousins. Indeed, searching the web using "yucca" as the keyword yields almost as many websites offering advice on how to kill it as how to grow it. Perhaps the developing interest in landscape plants that require little watering will influence the point of view.
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Joe Boggs

Gyspy Moth Update, Part 2

A recent BYGL Alert (June 17, 2021 - https://bygl.osu.edu/node/1802) has prompted some emails coming from the following counties: Wayne, Medina, Lorain, Erie, Williams, Lucas  and Wood.

 

Caterpillars are gaining in size, their appetite is increasing, and their frass is falling. Last evening, I went to check out a site in Lucas County, in Toledo's Ottawa Park. The park includes many oaks, in the turf areas, and in the wooded area between the open areas and the adjoining golf course. There is plenty of food for these hungry...

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Amy Stone

What is Going on with the Birds??

Recently, there have been reports of ill or dying birds found around Ohio and in nearby states. These birds often have swollen eyes, discharge from their eyes that may appear crusted, or a lack of clarity to the eyes. Affected birds may also exhibit neurological signs, for example their head may hang to one side then flop to the other side. What is causing it and what can you do to help?
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Authors
Marne Titchenell

Look Up for Cottony Maple Leaf

Cottony Maple Leaf Scale (Pulvinaria acericola) was once a relatively common pest of maples in Ohio. However, this native “soft scale” virtually dropped off our radar until last year when noticeable populations were reported in the central and southwest parts of the state.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Elms with Holey Leaves

The holy handiwork of the Elm Flea Weevil (Orchestes steppensis) is evident on native, non-native, and hybrid elms in southwest Ohio. Holes in elm leaves result from the adult “snout beetles” feeding on the leaves as well as the larvae tunneling between the upper and lower leaf surfaces as leafminers.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

There’s Corn in My Lawn!

I received a phone call yesterday from a homeowner proclaiming, “there’s corn coming up in my lawn!” I asked if the lawn was newly seeded and the caller said it was not; the lawn had been established several years ago. It’s a useful question because wheat is notorious for springing up from errant seed in straw used to cover turf seed.
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Authors
Joe Boggs