Chadwick Arboretum's Virtual Winter Solstice Program

Grab your hot cocoa, roast some chestnuts, and join us in Chadwick Arboretum for this virtual presentation.  Since Covid 19 has forced us to virtual programming, and the solstice will be soon, and the Solstice Walk is a popular evening event, we are changing it up a little to allow more people the opportunity to learn about the solstice, stars, and the labyrinth at Chadwick Arboretum. 
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Authors
Pam Bennett

Street Trees Part 5 – Gymnocladus, Kentucky Coffee Tree, Gleditsia, Honeylocust, and Koelreuteria, Goldenrain Tree

This week we look at what some very durable choices for street trees. These include Kentucky Coffee Tree, Honeylocust and Golden Rain Tree. The latter two may have been overused for this application in the past several decades but are still good trees when used in combination with other Genus and species to increase diversity.
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Authors
Thomas deHaas
Erik Draper
Ann Chanon

Waking Up To Mother Nature's Beauty

Earlier today, I woke up and looked out a window to see a foggy start to the day. At first glance, I however overlooked the frost that was also present. As it became lighter and the morning continued, the frost lessened and by noon the beauty disappeared, although the fog is still hanging around.   
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Authors
Amy Stone

Street Trees Part 4 – Eucommia (Hardy Rubber Tree), Ginkgo (Ginkgo), Maclura (Osage Orange)

Eucommia (Hardy Rubber Tree), Ginkgo (Ginkgo), Maclura (Osage Orange) This week we look at what some would deem ‘Odd’ for street trees but can be good choices for harsh conditions. The key is to pick the right plant cultivar, or you may be headed for trouble.
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Authors
Thomas deHaas

Invasive of the Week - Phragmites (Phragmites australis)

Phragmites is a non-native perennial grass this is commonly referred to as common reed. The wetland grass thrives in its name sake - wetlands or low areas - but can also establish itself in other areas. It is commonly found along roadsides in ditches, in retention ponds and bioswales, along the edges of ponds, rivers and lakes, and will completely infiltrate a wetland, quickly becoming a monoculture - single species. It is considered invasive as it outcompetes all other plants and displaces wildlife as it becomes the top-plant, at least in numbers, in a given area.
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Authors
Amy Stone

Seasonal Scouting for Viburnum Leaf Beetle Eggs

While the leaves of viburnum (Viburnum spp.) shrubs have fallen, if the viburnum leaf beetle (Pyrrhalta viburni) was present earlier this year, the eggs laid on the shrubs newest growth will be evident. This non-native invasive species feeds a larvae and adult, skeletonizing viburnum leaves. When population level of the insect increase, defoliation of the shrub becomes more obvious. The insect will feed on naturally growing viburnums, as well as those planted in landscapes, in commercial plantings and at gardens and arboretums. 
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Authors
Amy Stone

Virtual Session on Invasive Jumping Worms - Thursday, November 19, 2020

Emerald Ash Borer University (EABU) will be presenting a virtual session on Thursday, November 19 at 11 am EST - Invasive Jumping Worms: The Impact of a New Soil Invader. This session, like all EABU sessions, will be recorded and the link will be posted on the regional Emerald Ash Borer website at http://www.emeraldashborer.info/  
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Authors
Amy Stone