TURF TIPS

A couple of BYGL’ers received calls about their client’s horses producing large amounts of slobber. While we are not horse experts we became interested in the fact that in most cases this excessive salivation is caused by the horse ingesting large amounts of legumes that are infected with a fungus called Rhizoctonia leguminicola.

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Todd Hicks and Joe Rimelspach discuss the effect of constant moisture on turf including leaf spot, red thread and slime mold.

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BYGLers discussed the distinct possibility that this could be a very "good year" for white grubs in many areas of Ohio. First, localized JAPANESE BEETLE (Popillia japonica) populations are very heavy in some areas of the state and adults are no doubt still appearing on the scene.

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Some don't notice the mushrooms, others consider them to be a nuisance that distracts from the appearance of their lawns, and others are concerned that they may be poisonous and are a threat to their children and pets.

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We have been experiencing high levels of rain in Ohio this summer causing many of our plants to suffer. This includes our turf grass.

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This rainy weather is for the ducks! It may also be favorable weather for the establishment of white grubs in turfgrass. Several BYGLers have reported observing adult activity of JAPANESE BEETLES (Popillia japonica), NORTHERN MASKED CHAFER BEETLES (Cyclocephala borealis), and EUROPEAN CHAFER BEETLES (Rhizotrogus majalis).

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Joe Rimelspach reported on this week's BYGL call that the heat, rain, and humidity have created the perfect storm for turf diseases, particularly BROWN PATCH (Rhizoctonia solani) on tall fescue in home lawns. Samples have come into the lab from Northeast and Central Ohio.

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Interested in wanting to learn more about what it takes to manage a baseball field?

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Check out the latest turf videos posted on the Ohio Turfgrass Foundation website with three of the OSU Turf Team.

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Birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) is a perennial, spreading, herbaceous legume native to Europe and Asia. It was introduced into North America for use as a forage crop harvested for hay or used in pastures.

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