TURF TIPS

Joe Rimelspach reported that yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus) is flourishing in many Ohio lawns. Nutsedges do best during the warm months of summer. Most grasses used in Ohio lawns are cool-season plants meaning that high temperatures stunt their growth; they are at a disadvantage when competing head-to-head with warm-season plants.

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It just depends on where you live. This phrase was evident in hearing everyone's reports on BYGL this week regarding the quality of the turfgrass, especially in non-irrigated sites throughout the buckeye state. Joe Rimelspach began his report by saying that he has never seen lawns in certain central Ohio areas look so good in July.

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Joe Rimelspach, Turfgrass Pathology Ohio State University Extension Specialist, dropped a "red thread bombshell" on the assembled BYGL group stating RED THREAD, pathogen Laetisaria fuciformis, is not just related to a lack of nitrogen; although, that is most often what we assume is lacking in the turfgrass.

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Small, round, colored pustules are popping up in turf and we call these prolific, protruding pustules SLIME MOLDS. Slime molds become much more visible during periods of warm, wet weather, because the slime molds migrate onto the surfaces of turfgrass leaves.

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Joe Rimelspach, Turfgrass Pathology Ohio State University Extension Specialist, mentioned to the assembled group of BYGLers that RED THREAD, pathogen Laetisaria fuciformis, has not slackened its assault on lawns. Joe held forth on his favorite soapbox of turf diseaseology to try and help the assembled masses understand why this fungal disease continues to hang on!

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Joe Rimelspach from the Department of Plant Pathology at Ohio State provides a detailed review of anthracnose, which has been popping up at courses throughout the region.

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WHITE CLOVER (Trifolium repens) (a.k.a. 'Dutch' clover, 'Ladino' clover or 'New Zealand' white clover) is a cool-season perennial that grows in patches that can take over low-maintenance lawns (i.e. lawns that receive little to no fertilizer, little to no irrigation water, and/or are mowed to a height shorter than 2.5").

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If your lawn is not as green as you would like, it may be in need of nitrogen. It is time to fertilize. Nitrogen is one of the nutrients that can be depleted as plants grow and reproduce; it needs to be replenished. The amount of nitrogen your lawn needs will depend on the type of grass and its environmental conditions.

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Joe Rimelspach with the OSU Buckeye Turf team reported that there are three important lawn care maintenance tips for this time of the year; mow at the proper height, use a sharp blade, and mow frequently. As fast as the grass is growing at this time of the season it can be difficult to keep up with these recommendations however following these tips are important steps to establishing a healthier and thicker lawn.

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Joe Rimelspach, Turfgrass Pathology Ohio State University Extension Specialist, mentioned to the assembled group of BYGLers that RED THREAD, pathogen Laetisaria fuciformis, has begun its assault on lawns. Joe held forth on his favorite soapbox of lawn diseases and helped everyone to understand why suddenly this fungal disease seems to appear out of nowhere.

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