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Control Poison Hemlock Now! boggs.47 Thu, 04/28/2016 - 12:04

This non-native invasive weed is among the most deadly plants in North America.  This biennial weed spends its first year as a basal rosette and the second year as an erect, towering flowering plant that can measure 6-10' tall.  Despite its common name, poison hemlock is not a tree; it is a member of the carrot family, Apiaceae (formerly Umbelliferae).

 

Poison Hemlock Plants in the Spring

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Joe Boggs
Eastern Tent Cats to Arrive Soon boggs.47 Mon, 03/14/2016 - 16:13

The accumulated Growing Degree Days (GDD) that predicts eastern tent caterpillar (ETC) (Malacosoma americanum) egg hatch is 92.  Cincinnati has reached 89 GDD meaning that ETC eggs are poised to begin hatching in southwest Ohio.  ETC spends the winter in shiny, blackish-brown egg masses wrapped around twigs on their host plants.  A close examination will reveal that the eggs are encased in a structure that resembles bubble-wrap.

 

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Joe Boggs

Fall Clean Up for a Healthier Spring Landscape!

Fall is an important time in landscape maintenance.  Many pest problems and diseases encountered this season may survive until next season on or in plant debris.  Cultural practices completed prior to the beginning of winter will ensure a healthier landscape for next spring. 

Some of the fall crops can still be left in the garden for a while, however warm season vegetables are about done for the season.  Remove all annual vegetable plants from garden beds in order to prevent overwintering insect and diseases.  Diseased plants should not be composted unless the compost pile reaches...

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Julie Crook

Overwintered Calico Scale Females are Puffing Up and Dripping Honeydew

Overwintered calico scale (Eulecanium cerasorum) females are now "puffing-up" and pumping out impressive quantities of clear, sugary honeydew in southwest Ohio.  This is a non-native "soft scale" meaning that mature scales are protected by a soft shell.  The scale's common name comes from the starkly contrasting calico pattern of black-and-white markings on the hemispherical-shaped shells of mature females.  The mature females measure about 1/4" in diameter and their distinct markings make them easy to recognize, particularly on bark and branches that are blackened by sooty mold...

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Joe Boggs

Tree of the Week: Sweetgum

  You are all waiting for BYGLQuest 3 results, I know you are...Soon. For now, though" 

  There are variegated sweetgums. There are upright sweetgums. There are those who are driven to distraction by sweetgum fruits, cool though they are.  There are the multitudinous fall colors of sweetgum, There are the winged stems of many sweetgums. There are the truly wonderful monoecious flowers of sweetgum. There are sweetgums in the snow. There are sweetgums that range from Florida to states north of Ohio. Liquidambar styraciflua, you of the twice-named gum, we barely know ye!...

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Jim Chatfield