Recent content

Spring Cankerworms Appreciate Warm Weather!

As I was walking into one of the offices on The Ohio State University Campus this morning, a small grey-colored moth caught my eye.  Upon closer inspection it was a male of the spring cankerworm, Paleacrita vernata (Lepidoptera, Geometridae)!  After my meeting I walked around the building and quickly spotted one of the females, also on a wall. The females are unusual in that they have no wings.  They look like little fuzzballs!  The females release a pheromone which attracts males for mating.  Soon after mating, the females attach eggs, usually onto potential host trees, mainly...

Published on
Authors
Dave Shetlar

Painted Hickory Borers Show Up in Homes

At this time of the year, we often get reports of folks seeing the locust borer, Megacyllene robiniae, in their homes!  In fact, they are finding the painted hickory borer, Megacyllene caryae.  Both beetles are in the same genus and they look nearly identical unless you hold them side-by-side.  The adult beetles are just over an inch in length and generally black with yellow bands and chevrons across their backs.  The locust borer has larvae that can attack black locust trees and the adults are commonly seen on goldenrod in September until the first killing frost hits. ...

Published on
Authors
Dave Shetlar

Heavenly Hellebores

Now that winter seems to have finally arrived, we will soon be seeing some harbingers of spring; the nodding flowers of hellebores.  There are approximately 15 species within the Helleborus genus.  The most commonly found are Helleborus niger (Christmas rose) and Helleborus orientalis (Lenten rose), most cultivars found in stores are hybrids of Helleborus orientalis and are listed as Helleborus x hybridus.  Despite its common name it is not closely related to the rose family.

 

In spite of its beauty and other attractive...

Published on
Authors
Jacqueline Kowalski
Silver Maple Flower Fascination draper.15 Mon, 03/14/2016 - 16:17

Ever wonder why when passing a Silver Maple (Acer saccharinum) in flower, one week the blooms appear to be a green-yellowish cast and then suddenly, a little while later, the blooms appear to have turned red?  Then the questions begin like, did I misidentify the tree or did I really see light yellow blooms on the branches?  First and foremost, you are not going crazy, and in the case of the silver maple, it is perfectly normal to see both colors of blooms!  According to Micheal A. Dirr's Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, silver maple blooms are described as follows: "...

Published on
Authors
Erik Draper
Invasive Species and Smartphone Technology smith.81 Mon, 03/14/2016 - 16:20

Non-native Invasive species issues are commanding a lot of natural resource professional's attention these days. Whether it concerns insects, diseases, plants, mammals or aquatic species there is something out there for everyone! One thing that is true across the board is that early detection is key to dealing more effectively with all of these.

 

As a group of Extension professionals were discussing our new Asian longhorned beetle infestation in 2011 we kept coming back to how do we get these things reported early when they are still on a relatively small scale. We were...

Published on
Authors
Kathy Smith

Skunk Love is in the Air!

The skunk mating season is underway (mid-February – April), and homeowners may see an increase of skunks this time of year, or rather smell an increase in skunks! Male skunks are polygamous and right now are traveling far and wide in search of females, which accounts for the increase in sightings and smellings this time of year. During these travels and times of increased activity, skunks are more likely to encounter threats, and therefore spray. Skunks spray for the primary reason of defense from a perceived threat. That threat could be a human, pet, or another wild animal....

Published on
Authors
Marne Titchenell