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Must See Website - Mary Gardiner, Department of Entomology stone.91 Sun, 05/15/2016 - 19:43

We have a website that you will want to be sure is included in your list of favorites!  Dr. Mary Gardiner is an Associate Professor and State Extension Specialist in the Department of Entomology and doing some amazing work in Ohio.  Dr. Gardiner received her PhD from Michigan State University in 2008 and established the Agricultural Landscape Ecology Laboratory (ALE Lab) in 2009.  The ALE Lab is interested in understanding how the design and management of an urban greenspace or agroecosystem influences food web structure and function. 

 

Some of the ALE website highlights...

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Amy Stone
New Look to Growing Degree Website stone.91 Sun, 05/15/2016 - 22:34

Have you visited the Ohio State University's Growing Degree Day (GDD) website this spring?  If you haven't, you are in for a treat!  The website has a new look, is very easy to navigate, and has an added feature that everyone will be using. 

Once on the home-page, you have an option of inputting any Ohio zipcode.  The date will always be the current date, although you can manipulate and use past dates in your search.  Once the zipcode has been added, website users click on "show me the calendar" and are taken to a short sequence of what is occuring with plant blooms (first bloom or...

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Amy Stone

Horned Oak Gall Leaf Galls

When most people think of horned oak galls, they visualize the gnarled, woody stem galls that form on the twigs and small branches of pin oaks.  This is understandable since the gall-making wasp, Callirhytis cornigera (Family Cynipidae) that's responsible for directing the growth of the stem galls spends 33 months developing inside individual chambers within these very obvious galls.

The galls grow larger in size with each season.  In early spring, as the immature wasps near the completion of their development, the whitish-tan, cone-shaped “horns” that give this gall its...

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Joe Boggs

Oak Marginal Leaf Fold Gall

So-called marginal leaf fold galls are appearing on oaks in the "red oak group" in southwest Ohio.  The galls appear as rolled or folded leaf margins and are produced by a gall-making midge fly, Macrodiplosis erubescens (Family Cecidomyiidae).  As with the vast majority of oak galls, the leaf fold galls cause no appreciable harm to the overall health of affected oaks.  However, the gall has become notorious in recent years for its connection to a non-native predaceous mite (Pyemotes herfsi) that may feed on the gall-making midge fly larvae (maggots).  The mite...

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Joe Boggs

Erineum Patches on American Beech Leaves

The felt-like erineum patches produced by the eriophyid mite, Acalitus fagerinea, on the upper leaf surfaces of American beech are now appearing in southwest Ohio.  Currently, the patches are light-yellow.  However, they progress through several color stages throughout the season from light green in the spring to brilliant yellow to yellowish-gold then rusty red to reddish-brown and finally dark brown.

Although the patches are located on the upper leaf surface, they cause a dimpling of the lower leaf surface beneath the patch. 

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Joe Boggs

More Anthracnose

Last week, we reported that leaf and stem symptoms of the fungal disease known as sycamore anthracnose were becoming evident on the namesake host in many areas of Ohio.  This week, we're adding ash, oak, and beech to the list of foliar anthracnose diseases appearing in the southwest part of the state.  It's important to keep in mind that the anthracnose diseases affecting sycamore, ash, oak, and beech are each produced by a different host-specific fungus.  The fungus that produces anthracnose on sycamore does not infect ash, oak, or beech and vice versa; the fungus responsible for ash...

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Joe Boggs