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Badaling, Badaling: The Great Wall of China

A trip to China often includes a visit to The Great Wall of China, to some part of the 5500 to 13,000 mile collection of fortifications (depending on whether various branches are included).   So, I set out for the Great Wall with my guide Nina during my trip to the Beijing Botanic Gardens for their Crabapple Conference. Nina gassed up a Hyundai and we headed 50 miles northwest and over a half mile in elevation to Badaling (八达岭), the most visited section of the Wall and the first opened to tourists in 1957. From Nixon to Obama, to Nina and me.  

 

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Jim Chatfield

Is it Time to Plant Tomatoes? Check the Soil Temperature!

This time of year everyone is anxious to get out and begin planting their vegetable garden. You may have spent the last few months browsing the seed catalogs and dreaming about fresh tomatoes from your garden. Also you may have recently noticed vegetable transplants at your local retailers however this does not necessarily mean it is time to start planting.
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Julie Crook

Glenwood Gardens: A "Volcano" Mulch-Free Zone

Most of my images are of bad things in landscapes. I use these teaching images to illustrate plant threats; sometimes those threats are from people. So-called "volcano mulch" or "mulch mounds" is a good example. That's why I was so thrilled yesterday when I found example after example of absolutely perfect tree mulching at Glenwood Gardens!
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Joe Boggs

Slugged Rose Leaves

Roseslug sawflies were once generally considered only nuisance pests of roses in Ohio. The Common Roseslug Sawfly was most often encountered followed occasionally by the Curled Roseslug. The common roseslug has only one generation and the curled roseslug two generations. These sawflies would come and go so quickly they seldom caused appreciable damage.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Corrugated River Birch Leaves

The unusual leaf distortion damage caused by the spiny witchhazel gall aphid (Hamamelistes spinosus) is now appearing on river birch in southwest Ohio. The aphid produces raised ribs or "corrugations" on the upper leaf surface that match deep furrows between the veins on the lower leaf surface where the aphids live.
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Joe Boggs
Springtime in Ohio chatfield.1 Thu, 04/27/2017 - 08:56

  Woke up, got out of bed, dragged a comb across my head…Well, no, that is truly Fake News. Yet, upon returning from China to Springtime busting out all over in Ohio, I was mesmerized by the buzzing bees and budding birches; the blending of sweet birch catkins and flowering dogwood bracts above. Welcome to the Show! And right here in the Wayne County ChatScape.

 

  Up first, with a nod to China, is a golden-leaved ‘Ogon’ cultivar of dawnredwood, Metasequoia glyptostroboides.

 

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Jim Chatfield

Crabapples in China

  One of the more pleasant e-mails I have received in recent memory was from my friend and colleague Dr. Ling Guo of the Beijing Botanic Gardens. It read: “Jim, would you please come to Beijing for Crabapple Conference in April 14-19 for one hour talk. All expenses paid.  Hmm, let’s see. Yes!  Fortunately, for my talkative nature it turned out to be a bit more than that one hour talk, not including the translations, but what a deal. 

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Jim Chatfield
Erik Draper

First Generation Pine Needle Scale Crawlers are Afoot.

First generation Pine Needle Scale (Chionaspis pinifoliae) crawlers (1st instar nymphs) are now appearing on conifers in southwest Ohio. This is a type of "armored" scale so-named because of the hard, waxy cover (test) that protects the females. The egg-shaped pine needle scale tests are snow white with a small yellowish-tan spot at the small end.
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Joe Boggs

Boxwood Leafminer Major

I first raised the alarm on boxwood leafminers (Monarthropalpus flavus) in a BYGL Alert posted in late March (see "Blistered Boxwoods and Hissing Hedges", March 30, 2017). That report focused on alerting landscape managers that high localized populations were producing heavy leafmining symptoms that could be mistaken for winter injury.
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Joe Boggs

Crabapples In Crablandia Are A Dazzling Display!

The crabapple plot, called Crablandia in Secrest Arboretum, is located in Wooster, Ohio and will be in full bloom and full splendor, in the next couple of days.  With the onset of multiple periods of unseasonably warm weather, the typical bloom emergence time is about 2 weeks ahead of schedule.  The incredible display of crabapple flowers has traditionally been one of the most popular times to stroll through the Arboretum and experience the amazing fragrance, accompanied by marvelous views of flower petals.

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Erik Draper

Rusty Junipers

Junipers in southwest Ohio are being garnished with tangerine tentacles and orange goo; the calling cards of rust fungi. The three fungi producing the colorful displays belong to the genus Gymnosporangium and each must alternate between a member of the plant genus Juniperus and members of the rose family (Rosaceae) in order to complete their life cycle.
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Joe Boggs

Wilting Buckeyes

Wilting buckeyes may sound like an Ann Arbor dream, but I'm not talking about our beloved Silver Bullets. I'm referring to the symptoms caused by the Buckeye Petiole Borer (Proteoteras aesculana) on its namesake host.
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Joe Boggs

Calico Scale is Puffing-Up and Pumping Honeydew

Overwintered calico scale (Eulecanium cerasorum) females are now "puffing-up" and pumping out impressive quantities of clear, sugary honeydew in southwest Ohio. The appearance of the globular, helmet-shaped females coupled with complaints of trees oozing sticky goo makes this life-stage important for detecting new infestations. All other life-stages are much less obvious.
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Joe Boggs

Sneaky Common Chickweed is Going to Seed

Common Chickweed (Stellaria media) is a European winter annual that is now found world-wide. Winter annuals are sneaky weeds. They produce seeds in the spring then plants fade away prior to the summer season; out of sight, out of mind. The seeds dodge spring applied preemergent herbicide bullets because they do not germinate until the fall. The resulting plants grow below our radar throughout the fall, winter, and early spring when we pay little attention to what's going on in our lawns and landscapes.
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Joe Boggs

Focus on Poison Hemlock Control

Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum) is one of the deadliest plants in North America. This non-native invasive was imported as an ornamental in the late 1800s from Europe, West Asia, and North Africa. The plant contains highly toxic piperidine alkaloid compounds, including coniine and gamma-coniceine, which cause respiratory failure and death in mammals.
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Joe Boggs

Tigers are Prowling Ohio Woodlands

My good friend Brad Bonham told me about a conversation she had with a landscaper over the weekend who declared they were seeing Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis) (EAB) beetles mating in a woodland in southwest Ohio. Of course, as she noted, it's way too early for EAB adults to be on the wing; full bloom of black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) is a good phenological indicator for EAB adult emergence.
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Joe Boggs

Not Too Early For Ticks: Dog Tick

It's never too early for tick awareness.

Today, at the Extension Office, a tick sample was brought in for identification.  It was an adult male dog tick, Dermacentor variabilis.  Ticks are blood-feeding parasites.  Three species are medically important in Ohio as a vector of several diseases affecting humans and pets to varying degrees.  The American Dog Tick, along with the deer tick (or black-legged tick) and the lone star tick.  Tick populations have been an increasing problem in Ohio.

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Ashley Kulhanek

Eastern Tent Caterpillar Update

Eastern Tent Caterpillars (ETC) (Malacosoma americanum) caterpillars are accomplished and prolific tent-makers producing highly visible silk nests in the forks of branches. The nests are now large enough to be easily seen in Greater Cincinnati. However, at this point in the season, it appears that populations are highly localized and not widespread.
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Joe Boggs
NW Ohio Anticipating Egg Hatch of Gypsy Moth stone.91 Thu, 04/13/2017 - 15:41

Conversations among family and friends this week could include dying, hiding and finding "eggs." It is Easter you know. 

 

The eggs that we are talking about in this BYGL Alert are those of the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar).  After spending about nine months in the egg mass stage, warmer temperatures are triggering the hatch of the caterpillars in Ohio.  These tan almost felt-like in appearance masses that can be laid anywhere will soon be bursting with 1st instar caterpillars. 

While we are eagerly awaiting the first hatch in NW Ohio,...

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Amy Stone

Spring Lawn Seeding

 

This Turf-Tip was provided Joe Rimelspach and Todd Hicks with OSU – Plant Pathology and Turfgrass Program.

 

Of the four seasons, this is the “third best time” to seed a lawn. The best is autumn, then winter, followed by spring and the least desirable time is summer. The main challenge with the spring seeding is the large number of weeds (both grassy weeds and broadleaf weeds) that can come up with the grass seed. Seed as early as possible in the spring so new plant can develop a root system before summer heat and dry conditions...

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Amy Stone

Product or Active Ingredient - Could There Be Confusion?

 

Earlier this week, Pamela Sherratt, Turfgrass Specialist in the Department of Horticulture and Crop Science at The Ohio State University alerted Extension to the potential of some questions coming into the Extension offices about a product, Roundup for Lawns from clientele across the state.    

 

A walk through the aisles of the pest management area of a garden center this spring may cause some consumers to take a second look. While Roundup has been around for a long time, Roundup for Lawns is a new product that has recently hit the shelves. The same name and...

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Amy Stone

Sawfly Leafminers Fly

I found Elm Leafminer Sawfly (Fenusa ulmi) adults flying around their namesake host yesterday in southwest Ohio. The emergence of this leafmining sawfly was predicted in my part of the state by accumulated GDD (219) and phenological indicators such as the full bloom of common chokecherry. This also means there is little doubt that Birch Leafminer Sawfly (F. pusilla) and Hawthorn Leafminer Sawfly (Profenusa canadensis) adults are on the wing.
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Joe Boggs

Juniper Scale Examined

I came across an infestation of Juniper Scale (Carulaspis juniperi, Family Diaspididae) Sunday while doing some unconditional pruning (e.g. whacking back!) of junipers in the Boggscape. The discovery provided great samples to share, examine, and discuss with participants in the first 2017 Southwest Ohio BYGLive! Diagnostic Walk-About held yesterday at Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum.
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Joe Boggs

Form and Function

In architecture,  a term often used is form (ever) follows function.  This was coined and practiced by the 20th century U.S. architect Louis Sullivan and inspired, for example, Frank Lloyd Wright.

 

  A loose form of this emerged during a recent class trip for the Horticulture and Crop Science 3410 class (Sustainable Landscape Maintenance). We had just visited the wonderful “Building Ohio State: From Forest to the Renovation of Thompson Library” exhibit on the first floor of the magnificent OSU Thompson Library (exhibit until May 14) on the Main Campus in Columbus...

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Jim Chatfield

Updated EAB Detection Map

Each month, the United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Animal Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) updates and distributes an Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) Detection Map. While EAB is "old news" to many in the buckeye state, it is interesting to continue to watch the progression of this invasive species in North America. In February 2003, EAB was confirmed for the first time in Ohio in Lucas County in NW Ohio, approximately seven months after the initial detection and identification in Michigan the summer before. Fast forward 14+ years later...

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Amy Stone

Outstanding Resource for Testing Ticks

Nancy Taylor recently found a great resource regarding ticks called the Laboratory of Medical Zoology (LMZ).  LMZ is an academic research lab at the University of Massachusetts with a focus on infectious diseases or more specific "zoonosis".  Their website describes zoonosis as "diseases with transmission cycles that involve other animal species."  One of the great things about this resource is that they test ticks for diseases.  The standard test of deer ticks is $50.00 and includes testing for Lyme disease, Anaplasmosis and Babesiosis.  In addition you can search their database and find...

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Pam Bennett
Emerald Ash Borer University - Spring 2017 stone.91 Mon, 02/20/2017 - 20:51

Are you looking to get your emerald ash borer (EAB) updates?  Pesticides?  Parasitoids?  Why not learn more about EAB and other invasives from the comfortable of your own office or home?  Tomorrow, February 21 is the official kick-off to the "2017 spring semester." 

 

On Tuesday, February 21, 2017 at 11:00 am EST, Dr. Cliff Sadof with Purdue University will be providing an update on Chemical Control of EAB:  What Works, What Doesn't Work, and Why.  This session is the first of a series of presentations that include information on hemlock woolly...

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Amy Stone

Building Ohio State - A Must See Library Exhibit

 

 

If you are on the Ohio State University campus anytime now until May 14, 2017,  Building Ohio State it is a must see.  In fact, it is worth a trip to Columbus to specifically see this library exhibit. You won't be disappointed as the amount of planning and preparation by the team that pulled everything together is truly amazing! You will learn about how trees play such an important role - both while they are alive and after they are harvested. One of my favorite areas of the exhibit included a "did you know case" that included a wide variety of...

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Amy Stone
Kathy Smith

Never Too Early To Begin Tracking Growing Degree Days (GDD)

A recorded breaking warm-up in January is just a memory. While temperatures are feeling a bit more winter-like, it is not too earlier to begin following the Growing Degree Day Calendar online at  https://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/gdd/

 

A quick check earlier today showed that Toledo had accumulated 16 GDD units in 2017.  Do you know what is happening in your part of the state? Check it out today! 

 

Once at the website, all you will need is an Ohio zipcode! 

 

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Amy Stone

ODA Announces 2017 Gypsy Moth Treatment Project Open Houses

The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) has announced the 2017 Gypsy Moth Treatment Project Open Houses that will be held this winter prior to treatment applications that will be made later in the spring and summer. 

 

 

The gypsy moth is currently in the egg mass stage where it has been since late last summer.  This spring, caterpillars will hatch and the feeding frenzy will begin. 

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Amy Stone

Ohio Woodlands, Water and Wildlife Newsletter Available Online

Have you heard of the Ohio State University Woodland Stewards Program?  If you haven't, I will let you in on a little secret.  The Ohio Woodland Stewards Program is an excellent educational resource that includes publications, workshops, classes, tree scale sticks, and links to other resources for anyone who cares for or manages trees, has an interest in aquatics and enjoys wildlife!

 

Ohio Woodlands, Water and Wildlife, is a newsletter that is produced three times a year. It provides subcribers with updates on the latest issues related to woodland management,...

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Amy Stone
Commercial Applicator Pesticide Recertification Conferences Scheduled stone.91 Wed, 12/28/2016 - 09:42
The Ohio State University's Pesticide Safety Education Program will be offering four Commercial Pesticide Applicator Recertification Conferences across Ohio during the winter of 2017.
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Amy Stone
Revised Worker Protection Standard Workshops Offered in 2017 stone.91 Wed, 12/21/2016 - 12:13

 

Is your business compliant with revised worker protection standards?  The Federal Worker Protection Standards (WPS) protects agricultural workers and pesticide handlers by reducing their risk from pesticide exposure.  WPS was revised in 2015, and phased-in compliance begins January 2, 2017. 

 

These FREE workshop will provide employers and managers what they need to bring their WPS Program in compliance with the new requirements, including changes in training, restrictions during applications, personal protective equipment, decontamination...

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Authors
Amy Stone

Tree of the Week: Sweetgum

  You are all waiting for BYGLQuest 3 results, I know you are...Soon. For now, though" 

  There are variegated sweetgums. There are upright sweetgums. There are those who are driven to distraction by sweetgum fruits, cool though they are.  There are the multitudinous fall colors of sweetgum, There are the winged stems of many sweetgums. There are the truly wonderful monoecious flowers of sweetgum. There are sweetgums in the snow. There are sweetgums that range from Florida to states north of Ohio. Liquidambar styraciflua, you of the twice-named gum, we barely know ye!...

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Jim Chatfield

2016 Ohio State University Green Industry Short Course A Success

A shout out to all the attendees, presenters, moderators and monitors who participated in the 2016 OSU Green Industry Short Course.  The Short Course was held last week in collaboration with the Ohio Turfgrass Foundation's Conference and Tradeshow at the Greater Columbus Convention Center. 
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Amy Stone

Last Vestiges of Fall, Part Deux

  As each day goes by, the season for fall color continues to fade, but one last time (oh maybe another to come), here are a few features from last week, starting with the lead photo of the European larch at OSU’s Wooster Campus showing its final glories before winter quiescence.

 

  Next, check out the roses in German Village, still blooming during the OSU Nursery Short Course and Ohio Turfgrass Foundation Show last week. Now they are surely blasted. But those leaves with the black spot will fall to the base of the plant and lurk into next season, developing spores for...

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Jim Chatfield

Last Vestiges of Fall, Part 1

  Last week was the Ohio Turfgrass Foundation Show and the OSU Green Industry Short Course and I took a few pastry-seeking walks down to German Village from the Columbus Convention Center. With this weekend’s cold and snow, let us remember some of the – last vestiges of fall, starting above with florist's geraniums, sure to no longer be with us.

 

  Barberry (Berberis) fall foliage is quite colorful, and while fact-checking a bit, I was surprised to learn that the Berberidaceae family also includes two of my favorite wildflowers, Podophyllum...

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Jim Chatfield

BYGLQuest 2016-3: The Name Game

And now…for BYGLQuest 2016-3...I hope you are adorned in your togas, using your fingers to eat olives and figs.  Or how about nocello poured over gelato?  At any rate, here is your weekend challenge – and timing is everything. The best answer to these four plant name and classification questions by 11:59 Sunday night, December 4, 2016 will receive a publication from my archives. 
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Jim Chatfield

Knowing About Trees... Will Definitely Please!

Have you always wanted to know more about trees and why they grow like they do, why they need the resources that they utilize and just what exactly do they need to grow and thrive… And have many other question like these?  Well the perfect learning opportunity has arrived with some outstanding speakers and researchers willing to share their current tree knowledge with you!

 

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Erik Draper

Shrub of the Week: Winterberry Holly

{Text and photos for this bygl-alert are provided by Paul Snyder, horticulturist for OSU’s Secrest Arboretum at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster, with a little help from Jim Chatfield}. Deck the halls with boughs of holly, winterberry (Ilex verticillata) that is. While this member of the genus Ilex is not what Thomas Oliphant had in mind when he transliterated the lyrics of this ancient welsh carol into English, it is what we think of at Secrest. Ilex verticillata is perhaps the most visually stunning member of the genus Ilex. Ilex, which comes from the...
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Jim Chatfield

BYGLQuest 2016-2 Revealed: Its The Blueberries

 

  You may recall that the challenge for BYGLQuest 2016-2 (http://bygl.osu.edu/node/649) was to identify all plants in the images accompanying the text. There were numerous fine responses, but the discriminator was the one and only person to identify the lead image (see above).  It is a blueberry (Vaccinium sp.) in my backyard.

 

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Jim Chatfield
ALB eNewsletter from USDA stone.91 Tue, 11/29/2016 - 13:57

Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) has been in the news recently, including a BYGL Alert written by Joe Boggs on November 18, 2016 - "New ALB Infestation Found in Clermont County, OH."  That BYGL Alert can be found by clicking on this link:  http://bygl.osu.edu/node/641

 

While there is an interest in regular ALB Updates in Ohio since eradication efforts are underway to eliminate this exotic invader in the buckeye state.  People may occasionally want a national update with reports from Massachusetts and New York...

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Amy Stone

BYGL Mail - November 25, 2016: Ginkgoes and All Trees Remembered

  First things first: Remember that the Ohio Turfgrass Conference and the OSU Green Industry Short Course are coming soon (December 6-8), and are preceded by the OSU Trees on Tap program on December 5. Check it out:

  The program schedule is at:  http://www.otfshow.org/education/

  Register at:  http://www.otfshow.org/registration/

  And now to ginkgoes – and trees – for our Thanksgivings.  From Kent Honl, arborologist (a term from the great John Lloyd lexicon) of...

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Jim Chatfield

BYGL Mailbag - November 24, 2016: Nude VIburnums

  I was talking to the Ohio Hosta Society the other night about Vibunum nudum (go figure) and it reminds me now during this Thanksgiving holiday time that it is time to catch up with the BYGL Mailbag and comments from bygl-alert readers. Note: If you correspond, we will not use your name and direct quotes for these Mailbag items without your permission.

  So, Viburnum nudum…if you have read http://bygl.osu.edu/node/627 and http://bygl.osu.edu/node/635 you know...

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Jim Chatfield
Trees on Tap Program: December 5 chatfield.1 Wed, 11/23/2016 - 15:12
  Ohio is certainly the place for trees (more later), and you will certainly learn a great deal more about trees at OSU’s 2nd Annual Trees on Tap program on December 5 at the Ohio Convention Center, immediately preceding the 89th Ohio State University Green Industry Short Course and 50th Ohio Turfgrass Conference from December 6-8. 
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Jim Chatfield

Perennials for Shade

While some areas of the state have received their first snowfall of the season, others haven't had that joy - at least not yet.  This time of the year is a great time to expand your knowledge and learn the latest and the greatest; all in preparation for the 2017 season. 

 

If someone asks for a perennial recommendation for shade, do you answer with those perennial staples and long-time favorites?  Do you want learning more about perennials for shade beyond the basics?  Which plants can you tuck in the shade and it is there that they make a statement in the landscape?  Which...

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Authors
Amy Stone

Don't Be A Turkey And Miss The Green Industry Short Course and OTF Conference and Tradeshow Early Registration Deadline - November 25

As everyone is busily preparing for Thanksgiving, don't forget that the early registration for the 2016 Green Industry Short Course and the Ohio Turfgrass Foundation Conference and Tradeshow is Friday, November 25- it is like getting two educational programs for the price of one and the early bird registration discount is just another added bonus! 

 

There is also a group discount for the same business or organization who will be sending 5 or more employees. 

 

The event will be held at the Great Columbus Convention Center.  Pre-conference workshops are...

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Authors
Amy Stone
Shrubs of the Week: Rosa rugosa Plus chatfield.1 Tue, 11/22/2016 - 14:51

{The images and writing for this bygl-alert is from Joe Cochran, the Curator of OSU’s Secrest Arboretum at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster, Ohio}

  What a difference a day makes!  I awoke Saturday morning, November 19, to cold, blowing flurries along Granny Creek in Knox County. It was a mere 14 hours prior that I was strolling through the arboretum in short sleeves marveling at the autumn splendors. On trying to decide on a Shrub of the Week, it was soon evident that it would need to be Shrubs of the Week. It was the middle of November and the...

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Authors
Jim Chatfield
New ALB Infestation Found in Clermont County, OH boggs.47 Fri, 11/18/2016 - 17:10
A news release has been issued regarding a new Asian longhorned beetle infestation found in Clermont Count, OH.
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Joe Boggs
Tree of the Week: Ginkgo biloba chatfield.1 Fri, 11/18/2016 - 16:17

  Ginkgo leaves this past week or weekend or this very day are falling, or have fallen, or are still dangling golden earrings on the tree, or yet have a touch of green, or fall with the first snow: All at once, almost quantum-esque, depending upon location, within Ohio, or on one side of the street, or dependent upon the condition of the tree. Don’t believe me: check it out.  It is certainly one thing though: The Tree of the Week. Or is it merely one, or is it two, or both one and/or two?. Read on.

 

...

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Authors
Jim Chatfield

Learn The Latest on Invasives at the OSU Green Industry Short Course

While invasive species are on everyone's radar, do you know the latest? A great way to hear about the latest updates when it comes to invasive plants, insects and diseases is to attend the Ohio State University Green Industry Short Course and the Ohio Turfgrass Foundation Conference and Tradeshow in December at the Greater Columbus Convention Center. 

 

Joe Boggs and Amy Stone will be updating participants on invasive species in Ohio with updates from the field and what you can do to help with these battles on Wednesday, December 7. 

 

Kathy Smith will be...

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Authors
Amy Stone

OSU Green Industry Short Course and OTF Conference and Tradeshow - December 5 - 8

Tis' the season to register for the upcoming Ohio State University Green Industry Short Course and the Ohio Turfgrass Foundation Conference and Tradeshow!  While we haven't seen any snow yet, predictions are in the weekend forecast for at least the northeastern region of Ohio. 

 

Three preconference workshops will be offered Monday, December 5 and the program runs fromTuesday, December 6 through Thursday, December 8. There is still time to register at the early bird price but don't delay. Register before November 25 for the discounted price. More than five people attending...

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Amy Stone

First Freeze of Year in NW Ohio

Well we knew we could not avoid it forever.  The fall temperatures have been enjoyable.  Last night in NW Ohio, temperatures dipped to 25F.  Our average first freeze of the fall season occurs about three weeks earlier, and our first average measurable snowfall is just 2 weeks away.  Last night's low temperatures should have finally taken out those annuals and tender perennials that we have gotten to enjoy for an extended time this year.

 

While there were a couple frosts prior to last night's freeze, many herbaceous plants where still going strong.  It has been wonderful to...

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Amy Stone

Viburnum nudum, Part Deux

  Note: As you await tonight’s Election results, situated in front of your TV or at watch parties, here is something horticultural for you to vote upon: should you plant Viburnum nudum?  Read on.  

  On October 28, 2016 we did a bygl-alert for the Shrub of the Week as Viburnum nudum (http://bygl.osu.edu/node/627). Quickly we had some responses noting that, for example “…it might be helpful to include V. nudum's susceptibility to infestation by the Viburnum Leaf Beetle. ...

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Authors
Jim Chatfield
Curtis E. Young
Fall Foliage III chatfield.1 Mon, 11/07/2016 - 14:23

  Never-to-be-forgotten fall color continued this past Saturday in Wayne County in northeast Ohio – and I suspect, elsewhere. The red maple (Acer rubrum) above and the other images were all from Saturday morning, November 5, in my yard and the nearby Johnson Woods Nature Preserve near Orrville five miles away.

  Maples held sway in their many iterations, from the luminosity of sugar maples (Acer saccharum) at Johnson Woods, to the unusually foliated hornbeam maple (Acer carpinifolium) in the ChatScape.

 

...

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Jim Chatfield
Shrub of the Week: Common Witchhazel chatfield.1 Sat, 11/05/2016 - 16:38

  {This bygl-alert was written by Paul Snyder, horticulturist with OSU’s Secrest Arboretum at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster. Two pictures were added by Jim Chatfield.  

 

  Members of the genus Hamamelis open and close the season for woody flowering plants. Flowering begins with Hamamelis vernalis and Hamamelis x intermedia hybrids in the spring and end with the flowering of Hamamelis virginiana in the fall and Hamamelis mollis in early winter. One Hamamelis mollis selection, ‘...

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Jim Chatfield
Tree of the Week: Name That Plant chatfield.1 Fri, 11/04/2016 - 10:05

  This tree resides in my front yard, and was a gift from Rich Larson of Dawes Arboretum almost three decades ago after I gave a talk on pests and diseases of trees. Fortunately, this tree in general has few insects or infectious diseases and my gift tree and its multi-stemmed trunks has now grown about 40 feet tall in those 29 years. It is a native tree, but fairly unusual in Ohio woodlands. This tree has intensely lemon-yellow changing to burnt gold fall foliage which was spectacular from late October and now into the first few days of November this year. ...

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Authors
Jim Chatfield
Signs of the Times: From Trees to Turtles chatfield.1 Mon, 10/31/2016 - 17:16

  A recent bygl-mail correspondent, Beth Deimling from Lakeland Nursery in Indiana, recently wrote “As wonderfully entertaining authors of BYGL, I thought you might be appreciative of this sign that my husband and I saw while on vacation last month in Wisconsin. Of course, as world travelers, you may have already seen it, or something similar. Thanks for all of your stories, photos, and attempts at educating us!”

  It is a telling sign, as other locales deal with Emerald Ash Borer encroachments. The sign stirs up some memories of other signs of the times:  here are a few...

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Jim Chatfield

Trees on Tap - OSU Green Industry Short Course Pre-Conference Workshop - December 5, 2016

You won't want to miss this year's Trees on Tap preconference workshop as part of this year's OSU Green Industry Short Course (GISC), formally the OSU Nursery Short Course. 

 

The preconference workshop will be held on Monday, December 5, 2016 at the Columbus Convention Center.  Registration will be begin at 9:00 am, with the program starting at 9:30 am.  The workshop ends at 4:45 pm, with a workshop reception to follow. 

 

The workshop's agenda include the following topics:  Why Trees Matter; Treesources Must-Haves...

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Amy Stone
Tree of the Week: Korean Maple chatfield.1 Sun, 10/30/2016 - 16:57

  Ever since Kenny Cochran of Secrest Arboretum introduced me to Korean or purple-bloom maple, Acer pseudosieboldianum, and I planted one in my backyard, I have been in wonder of its features. Fall foliage color, of course (more on that later), but years ago after the first years in our laissez-faire landscape, and with it almost making it look like I knew what I was doing, with its elegant form and overarching branches, I brought this up to horticulturist extraordinaire Ethan Johnson of Holden Arboretum. 

  Ethan agreed on the fall color, but noted that in his experience...

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Jim Chatfield
Shrub of the Week: VIburnum nudum chatfield.1 Fri, 10/28/2016 - 13:36

   The text and images for this bygl-alert are by Paul Snyder, horticulturist with OSU’s Secreest Arboretum at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster}

 

  It is typical this time of year to have many tour groups visit Secrest. Planted along some of the paths is a plant that makes everyone stop and say, ‘Wow, what is it?” If you are thinking it is a selection of Malus you are mistaken.

 

...

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Jim Chatfield

Fall Clean Up for a Healthier Spring Landscape!

Fall is an important time in landscape maintenance.  Many pest problems and diseases encountered this season may survive until next season on or in plant debris.  Cultural practices completed prior to the beginning of winter will ensure a healthier landscape for next spring. 

Some of the fall crops can still be left in the garden for a while, however warm season vegetables are about done for the season.  Remove all annual vegetable plants from garden beds in order to prevent overwintering insect and diseases.  Diseased plants should not be composted unless the compost pile reaches...

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Julie Crook

Did You Know? It's Bat Week!

What IS Bat week, you ask? Bat Week is an annual, international celebration of the role of bats in nature. This year, Bat Week is right now! It started October 24th and runs through October 31st. Bat Week is organized by a team of conservation organizations and government agencies from across the United States and Canada with the goal of raising awareness and promoting conservation of bat species around the world.

 

...
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Marne Titchenell

Help Needed in Gray Fox Study

Calling all trappers! Trappers who catch gray fox this season are asked to contact the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Wildlife if gray foxes are caught. The Division of Wildlife is pursuing a gray fox study and requests the help of trappers in capturing study animals. Foxes caught that are deemed suitable for collaring and release will receive $40.00. NOTE: Only gray fox caught in the following counties are eligible: Athens, Belmont, Coshocton, Gallia, Fairfield, Guernsey, Hocking, Jackson, Lawrence, Meigs, Monroe, Morgan, Muskingum, Noble, Perry, Pike, Ross,...

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Marne Titchenell

Fall Color, Part Deux

  We have visited fall color themes with several recent bygl-alerts (http://bygl.osu.edu/node/612; http://bygl.osu.edu/node/603; http://bygl.osu.edu/node/602), and as the season progresses it just keeps getting richer. Following are some additional Season of 2016 features. And the lead picture above, though it looks like it comes from the Smokies or from Almost Heaven, is just from my backyard, with fall foliage rising from the strawberry fields forever of the...

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Jim Chatfield

Oaks, and Fall, and Propagation: Oh My!

  {This bygl-alert is from Paul Snyder, horticulturist at OSU’s Secrest Arboretum at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster, with a small assist from Jim Chatfield.}

  Note: The image above is of Chestnut Oak (Quercus prinus) acorns.  Members of the white oak group, like chestnut oak, should be planted immediately after collecting. The radicle (the first part of the plant embryo to emerge from the seed) comes out in the fall.

  Fall is here and that means trees are releasing their fruits produced over the summer. For squirrels and other...

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Jim Chatfield

Shrub of the Week: Buttonbush

  Native plants are all the rage in the plant world (apart from new hydrangea cultivars), and rightfully so―they are well adapted to our climate and zone, and serve as a host for a variety of insects, birds, and other wildlife. Indeed, when we plant a landscape we aren’t just making an area look nice. Rather, we are creating an ecosystem.

  A native plant that shines this time of year is Cephalanthus occidentalis, Buttonbush. This plant is commonly thought of only for its globular white flowers in summer. Yet this member of the Rubiaceae is attractive all season. Glossy...

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Jim Chatfield

Signs and Symptoms: A Tale of Two Tar Spots

  As noted earlier (http://bygl.osu.edu/node/525) there are two common tar spots of maple seen in Ohio.  One, that occurs commonly on silver and red maple results in dense, tarry spots caused by the fungus, Rhytisma acerinum. A second tar spot disease is typically found on Norway maple, with multiple tiny tarry spots that eventually coalesce into a larger spot, not quite as “tarry” but nonetheless black in color, caused by the fungus  Rhytisma punctatum.

 

...

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Jim Chatfield

Fall Home Invaders: spiders, stink bugs, and more!

The calls have begun.  Insects and spiders are being found inside homes around Medina, and I suspect many other counties in Ohio.  Fall brings an annual immigration of all sorts of arthropods but this is not meant to be a halloween horror, but a normal part of the life cycle and survival of many creepy (or cute!) crawlies.

 

Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs

...

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Ashley Kulhanek

Spotted Wing Drosophila in Raspberries

I received a report of "white worms" in fall-bearing raspberries associated with the activity of the non-native invasive pest, Spotted Wing Drosophila (Drosophila suzukii).  Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) is a tiny fly, nearly indistinguishable from our native common vinegar flies (also called fruit flies) without a magnifying device. (Photo courtesy of Jim Jasinski, OSU Integrated Pest Management Coordinator)
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Ashley Kulhanek
Read All About It! chatfield.1 Mon, 10/17/2016 - 09:01

  The love of books. As promised, here are the first five books to know about, read, teach your co-horts and fellow naturalists about, and to treat yourself and others to for the upcoming holidays. 

 

  1. A Sand County Almanac – Aldo Leopold. A naturalist’s classic.
  2. Seeing Trees – Nancy R. Hugo and Richard Llewellyn. Photographic and written essays of the annual life of trees.
  3. Manual of Woody Landscape Plants – Michael Dirr.  Must have for reference and priceless observations and perspectives.
  4. The Invention of...
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Jim Chatfield

Banded Garden Spider

The banded garden spider (Argiope trifasciata) is found throughout Ohio; however, it may be easily overlooked in favor of its slightly larger and more stunningly colored cousin; the yellow garden spider (A. aurantia).
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Joe Boggs
Curtis E. Young
Seasonal Needle Coloration chatfield.1 Fri, 10/14/2016 - 13:57

  Many of us are aware that pines and other narrow-leaved trees and shrubs that we term “evergreen”, do lose inner needles in the fall and sometimes in the spring, most noticeably on white pine. Others of us, though having seen it all our lives, may not have noticed (“The true voyage of discovery lies not in finding new landscapes, but in having new eyes” – Proust).  

  For those who are aware, “Remember what it was like not to know”, and teach others well.  Speaking of teaching this, no-one said it better than Aldo Leopold in his “A Sand County Almanac” (1949), a...

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Jim Chatfield
Perennial of the Week: New England Aster crook.46 Fri, 10/14/2016 - 13:42

New England aster (Symphyotrichumnovae-angliae) is an excellent plant for the fall garden.  In addition to providing color in the landscape, it also is a late-season source of pollen for bees and other pollinators.  New England aster is native to much of the Eastern US and its purple daisy-like flowers can be seen in fields in bloom now.  It blooms from late summer through October. This plant prefers moist, rich soils but will tolerate clay soils, and some drought once established.  New England aster grows well in a sunny location but can also succeed in partial shade.  This plant...

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Julie Crook
New Worker Protection Compliance Manual Now Available mrose Wed, 10/12/2016 - 12:17
The must-read manual for growers on the 2015 revised Worker Protection Standard (WPS) is now available. Horticultural growers such as greenhouses and nurseries will be most affected by these changes because of the numbers of workers they employ.  Retailers are also affected if pesticides are applied to holding areas. 
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Mary Ann Rose
White-tailed Deer Road Watch titchenell.4 Wed, 10/12/2016 - 09:11

White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) provide abundant recreation opportunities for hunters and wildlife watchers. Unfortunately, they can also cost us millions of dollars every year. How? Imagine you are driving down a poorly lit road at night when all of the sudden a deer appears on the road in front of you. Despite your honking and screeching breaks, the animal remains frozen in its tracks, exhibiting to perfection 'a deer in headlights'. Deer vehicle collisions are incredibly dangerous and often costly. So listen up motorists, now is the time when deer are on the move and...

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Marne Titchenell
Alarum Alarum Erratum Erratum: Nettles and Azaleas and My Red Face, Oh My chatfield.1 Tue, 10/11/2016 - 17:14

  To err is human, so I must most certainly be massively, essentially human. To the point, two such bygl-alert errors of mine due for acknowledgment come from two of my favorite plantspersons: Charles Tubesing of Holden Arboretum and Ron Wilson of Natorp’s Nursery

  First, to an egregious error most nettlesome. In http://bygl.osu.edu/node/596 I wrote of fruits of what I called “stinging nettle”.  As Charles pointed out these may be nettles that sting, but the plant I saw and the pictures of fruits and the wedge-shaped leaves I showed were...

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Jim Chatfield

Autumn Light

Autumn light is different from summer light: more golden, as light rays lengthen, with longer shadows.  While there is time, and while the blue skies we have enjoyed all growing season fade to gray as winter beckons, go forth and catch some slanted sun-rays of autumn.  Enjoy the full life of fall.  

  The past few days have brought out the colors of flowering dogwood (Cornus florida), often neglected when the best fall foliage plants are listed. As the lead picture shows it is wonderful now, and its fat flower buds promise springtime reprisals.

  Next, enjoy the...

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Jim Chatfield
Shrub of the Week: Purple Beauty Berry chatfield.1 Mon, 10/10/2016 - 14:16

{Photos and text for this bgyl-alert are provided by Joe Cochran, the Curator of OSU’s Secrest Arboretum at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster.}

 

  The fruits of purple beauty berry  (Callicarpa dichotoma) are among the most splendid of the fall-fruiting shrubs.  On arching branches, small delicate fruits appear to be glossy pearls that have been dipped in a lilac-violet varnish.  Against the light-green foliage their beauty cannot go unnoticed.  Growing 4-5 ft. with a slightly larger spread, the tips often reach to the ground. A...

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Jim Chatfield
Fruits of Fall chatfield.1 Sun, 10/09/2016 - 23:12

  Fall is for foliage, but also for – fruits.  We sometimes miss this for landscape plants, blinded by apples and apple cider and the final harvests from summer gardens. Yet there is much to enjoy.  So here is a short view of a few of The Fruits of Orrville, Ohio (Wayne County) with a finale the finale from Otterbein University in Franklin County.

 

  We started above with the bubble-gum colored fruits of Symphoricarpos. I am not sure of the species or cultivar of this particular street-planted beauty, though possibly it is Amethyst™ Symphoricarpos x...

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Jim Chatfield
Fall Foliage I chatfield.1 Sat, 10/08/2016 - 14:06

  We are entering that world-class time of the year for Ohio and the Eastern United States – the time of fall foliage color. Nevertheless, we are receiving numerous calls about what is wrong with their trees, especially honeylocusts; yellowing leaves and all.

  Nothing out of the ordinary – it is simply fall foliage time. Despite our warm temperatures and with it seeming like it is still summer - for trees - fall is proceeding as usual. There are factors of temperature and moisture that affect fall coloration intensity, but the key ingredient for fall color starts in the summer at...

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Jim Chatfield
Tree of the Week: Dawnredwood chatfield.1 Fri, 10/07/2016 - 10:25

  I once wrote a poem of the seasons of dawnredwood, Metasequoia glyptostroboides.  Let us deconstruct, starting with the name of this majestic tree, for as the Chinese philosopher Krishtalka noted: “The beginning of wisdom is calling things by their right name.”

  The Latin binomial itself is telling: “meta-sequoia” means “like-sequoia”, and dawnredwoods are related, in the Cupressaceae family, to the true redwoods, Sequoia and Sequoiadendron. The “glyptostrob-oides” refers to another sister genus in the Cupressaceae, Glyptostrobus....

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Jim Chatfield
Weekly Weed: Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense) boggs.47 Thu, 10/06/2016 - 13:51
Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense, family Poaceae) is a non-native perennial grassy weed that is becoming a serious problem in Ohio landscapes and nurseries.
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Joe Boggs
Edible Crabapple of the Week: Maypole chatfield.1 Mon, 10/03/2016 - 17:29
  Springtime comes to Autumn in the Eugene and Judy Pouly Domaine and Chatfield tables this evening: we shall be dancing around our Maypoles. No, we have not fast-forwarded the seasons. Instead we are enjoying the fruits of springtime flowers. To the point, ‘Maypole’ crabapple fruits turned into sauce so sweet and yet so sour.
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Jim Chatfield
Weed of the Week: Stinging Nettle chatfield.1 Sun, 10/02/2016 - 13:41

  At Johnson Woods Nature Preserve near Orrville in Wayne County, there are many wonderful plants including towering oaks and beeches and sourgums.  There are birds including barred owls that are a hoot to hear in matched pairs from across the preserve.  This past weekend the fungi were having a real coming out party following recent rains.  Squirrels, including black squirrels, were clucking away. And stinging nettles were fruiting; something I had never noticed before.  

 

...

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Jim Chatfield
Umbrellaland chatfield.1 Thu, 09/29/2016 - 11:31
  The Umbrella Magnolia Grove (Magnolia tripetala) at OSU’s Secrest Arboretum in Wooster, for almost a century was a revered place: a protected place from non-lightning rainstorms, a place for rituals of many a kind, a wow place for children, a favorite of now-retired Secrest curator, Ken Cochran.
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Jim Chatfield

Pythium and Phytophthora Pummel Pumpkins in NE Ohio

In the past few weeks, I have received multiple questions from farmers growing pumpkins, asking what is going on with the pumpkins!  When pressed about what they were seeing, the response is always a “come out and see for yourself” and so I usually do!  For me, plant problem diagnostics are ALWAYS more accurate and effective when done hands-on, using my own senses and asking those pertinent or impertinent questions to get at the answers!  In these cases of the great pumpkin patch puzzle, they would pick perfectly healthy looking pumpkins, wash the dirt off of rinds and put them into bins...

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Erik Draper

Ratty Redbuds

Although the growing season is winding down, Extension offices in Ohio are continuing to receive questions regarding redbud leaves turning brown after being folded over or "glued" together.  The culprit is the Redbud Leaffolder (Fascista cercerisella; order Lepidoptera; family Gelechiidae).
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Joe Boggs
A Tale of Two Visitors chatfield.1 Tue, 09/27/2016 - 12:19
  English ivy (Hedera helix) and wintercreeper euonymus (Euonymus fortunei) are two non-native climbers we are all accustomed to seeing in Ohio landscapes.  Horticulturists and natural area managers often have very different perspectives on these species here in Ohio and in areas, wanted and unwanted, where they grow. What is your “nature and nurture” perspective?
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Jim Chatfield

Planting/Transplanting Perennials in Early Fall Requires a Little Extra TLC

The recommended time for planting or transplanting perennials is late August or early September.  This gives adequate time for roots to establish before winter comes.  However, like most gardeners, I don't usually think about it in late August and besides, this year was too hot to take on this task anyways.

 

I finally got around to it this past weekend and the weather was glorious to work outside.  I needed to transplant a few perennials as well as plant some that I bought at a plant sale in the spring.  Yes, I am a little behind but I really didn't want to plant them...

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Pam Bennett

Mushroom is Magnificent!

A local arborist called me one day and asked if it was possible that I could identify a mushroom.  Sure, I said I could do that and reminded him that identification is always much easier if a sample was dropped off for me to examine.  Later, as I rehearsed our conversation, I remember hearing him chuckle and then saying, “Well, you’re going to love this one”.   I was thinking through a couple of types and shapes of typical mushrooms when I walked into my office the next morning.  You can imagine my surprise when I spied on my desk, the huge fruiting body of Bondarzewia berkeleyi ...

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Erik Draper
Woolly Bears on the Move boggs.47 Mon, 09/26/2016 - 14:38
Bristly "woolly bear" caterpillars have started their annual crawl-about in search of sheltered locations where they will spend the winter.  They may be found on sidewalks and walking trails or on the walls of homes and buildings.  Some may be slowly making their way to Vermillion, Ohio, to attend an annual festival held in their honor.
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Joe Boggs

From Webworms to "We All Scream": Walks in Wooster

  Over the past five weeks, Wooster Ohio, home of two great institutions of higher education, a liberal arts institution - the College of Wooster, and a land grant institution, Ohio State University’s Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, and the City of Wooster have provided ample photographic opportunities for horticulturalisms and botanizing. Here are a few, from my light and dark perspectives: 
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Jim Chatfield
Lazarus Lizards Rise in Cincinnati boggs.47 Mon, 09/26/2016 - 11:26
If you're hiking around Cincinnati on a warm sunny day and spot a lizard scurrying over rock walls or rocky slopes, it's likely to be the non-native European wall lizard (Podarcis muralis).  However, if you ask a Cincinnatian to identify the lizard, they will most likely call it the "Lazarus lizard."
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Joe Boggs
Beetles on Goldenrod boggs.47 Mon, 09/26/2016 - 09:55
Goldenrod (Solidago spp.) is in full bloom throughout the state.  Soldier beetles (Chauliognathus pennsylvanicus, family Cantharidae) and locust borer adults (Megacyllene robiniae, family Cerambycidae) are commonly found on the flowers of this beautiful native plant adding to the plant's interest to entomophiles.
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Joe Boggs
Orange Dogs and Family Matters boggs.47 Sun, 09/25/2016 - 18:36

I recently came across a bizarre looking caterpillar - it looked like bird poo - while looking on a wafer ash (Ptelea trifoliate) for the white, frothy "egg plugs" of the two-marked treehopper (Enchenopa binotata) and admiring some heavy potato leafhopper (Empoasca fabae) damage.  I learned the bizarre looking caterpillar has an appropriately bizarre sounding common name:  the orange dog.

 

The orange dog (sometimes called orange puppy) caterpillar is the larval stage of the eastern giant swallowtail butterfly (Papilio cresphontes).  As...

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Joe Boggs
Wafer Ash Leaves Fading to White boggs.47 Sun, 09/25/2016 - 18:29
Wafer ash (Ptelea trifoliate) which is also known as common hoptree or stinking ash has garnered considerable landscape interest in recent years owing to its native status in Ohio. However, wafer ash is also a potato leafhopper (Empoasca fabae) magnate.
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Joe Boggs
Shrub of the Week: Rhus chatfield.1 Sat, 09/24/2016 - 09:26
    When considering adding a touch of fall color to your landscape, don’t forget the sumacs.  Belonging to the family Anacardiaceae, some of their notable relatives include cashew, pistachio, mango, smokebush, and even poison ivy and poison sumac.  The genus Rhus, consists of around 35 species and grows in subtropical and temperate regions throughout the world, especially in East Asia, Africa, and North America.
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Jim Chatfield
Weed of the Week: Maximilian Sunflower (Helianthus maximiliani) boggs.47 Fri, 09/23/2016 - 17:06
I've received some helpful educational feedback in response to my BYGL Alert posted earlier today extolling the virtues of Maximilian Sunflower  (Helianthus maximiliani) [See Hort Shorts; Perennial of the Week:  Maximilian Sunflower  (Helianthus maximiliani)].
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Joe Boggs
Perennial of the Week: Maximilian Sunflower (Helianthus maximiliani) boggs.47 Fri, 09/23/2016 - 11:49
This native member of the Aster family (Asteraceae) has become one of my top favorite plants for naturalized areas.  Of course, there are no perfect plants; Maximilian Sunflowers mix a multitude of virtues with a few imperfections.
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Joe Boggs
Goldenrod is Glorious in Geauga! draper.15 Wed, 09/21/2016 - 19:40
It is a weed of waste places, which turns wherever it grows into a yellow-gold slice of sunshine on the ground, is Solidago spp. or more commonly known to many as the annoying weed, Goldenrod.  While it is known as a weed, it also provides a vibrant splash of color to the edges of fields, in ditches and other abandoned or disturbed sites.
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Erik Draper
Root of the Matter chatfield.1 Wed, 09/21/2016 - 14:48
  Tonight I am doing a program at Secrest Arboretum in the Ohio Chapter of the International Society of Arboriculture series for arborist certification. We will be learning together about “Tree Biology”, so let’s remind ourselves – and teach others – about “the root of the matter.”  Here are four maxims about the critical, but often overlooked by many, key to plant health: roots.
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Jim Chatfield
Joe Boggs
Erik Draper
Flowerosophy chatfield.1 Wed, 09/21/2016 - 10:07
  Flowers are, of course, wondrous, the birds and the bees and all that, the pollen grain germinating on the receptive stigma with the pollen tube then delivering sperm nuclei to the ovules below, with the thus fertilized eggs becoming seeds surrounded by the ovary ripening into the fruit. Flowers may be inconspicuous, but they may also may be beauteous; here are a few captured by camera this past week
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Jim Chatfield
Perennial of the Week: Ironweed kulhanek.5 Tue, 09/20/2016 - 12:28

Here at the Medina Extension Office, we have Ironweed (Vernonia spp.) planted among other native and annual flowers outside.  And every year people visit our office just to ask, "What is that giant purple flower!?"  Its purple flowers are quite an eye catcher and, despite having "weed" in its name, ironweed's late blooms in summer to fall and brilliant color make it an attractive native wildflower for many gardeners.

...

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Ashley Kulhanek
A Very Unusual Leaf Gall boggs.47 Mon, 09/19/2016 - 16:52
A number of interesting plant galls look so much like fungal structures that for years they were misidentified as a fungal plant disease.  Such is the case with the goldenrod leaf galls associated with the midge fly, Asteromyia carbonifera.
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Joe Boggs
Tactile Paving and Truncated Domes chatfield.1 Mon, 09/19/2016 - 13:14
  One of the joys of horticulture is the variety of people all of us meet and all of our different experiences and knowledge. With that in mind, earlier this year I learned about the world of truncated domes and tactile paving. 
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Jim Chatfield
Diagnostics: Who Knows Most About the Plants? chatfield.1 Sun, 09/18/2016 - 23:57
  On Vesey Street in downtown Manhattan, between the 9/11 memorials and the Irish Hunger Memorial along the Hudson River, is a row of Chinese elms in a streetscape. Recently, as I was walking there I noticed two of the elms with thinning foliage, and for that matter they were set apart by big-time protective railings and stakings and alone among the row, Treegators, extra factors that turned out to be mostly non-sequiturs, but did initially catch my eye.
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Jim Chatfield
Fall Forecast II chatfield.1 Sun, 09/18/2016 - 17:38
  Earlier this week Extensioneer Erik Draper featured poison ivy foliar coloration as a Harbinger of Autumn (http://bygl.osu.edu/node/567). As we approach September 22 and the Autumnal Equinox, here are a few more visuals of the changing of the guard.
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Jim Chatfield
Basswood Leafminer Found in Southwest Ohio boggs.47 Sat, 09/17/2016 - 09:35
BYGL readers should be familiar with the Basswood Leafminer (Baliosus nervosus; previously Baliosus ruber).  We've reported on the skeletonizing and leafmining activities of this native beetle for years.  High populations cause entire trees to become reddish-brown, usually in mid-to-late August.
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Joe Boggs
Curtis E. Young
Tree of the Week: Swamp White Oak chatfield.1 Fri, 09/16/2016 - 11:18

I was recently in New York City, 15 years after the 9/11 tragedy, and was reminded of that day. We were on our BYGL call back here in Ohio and Dave Dyke of OSUE, Hamilton County broke into a plant report with news that a plane, possibly a small plane had flown into the World Trade Center. We took it in and continued our reports.

 

  Minutes later he burst in that another plane had hit the other tower and that these were large passenger planes. Now we knew something was terribly wrong and yet, like many people, we tried to continue with our scheduled activities for a while....

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Jim Chatfield
Shrub of the Week: Comptonia (Sweetfern) chatfield.1 Fri, 09/16/2016 - 09:35
 This plant is not a fern. Rather, Sweetfern is a native woody shrub. According to E. Lucy Braun (The Woody Plants of Ohio), it is only found in a few counties in Ohio where it inhabits open oak forests, pastures, and roadsides. This plant fits into the category of small shrubs that many homeowners are looking for, maturing at a height of 2-4’.
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Jim Chatfield
There We Go...The Harbinger of Autumn Appears! draper.15 Thu, 09/15/2016 - 21:32

As I was driving along the roadways of Geauga County, I suddenly noticed the upright pillars of changing color wrapped around tree trunks.  Yes, I believe that it is most likely, that autumnal color is the ONLY redeeming quality of Toxicodendron radicans, commonly known as Poison Ivy!  At this time of year, the fall colors of this rash inducing woody vine, are unparalleled for their stunning reds, oranges, yellows and every color mixture in-between.  It almost makes one want to go up to collect some leaves to put in a fall color collage between pieces of waxed paper to hang on the...

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Erik Draper
Small White Masses on Red Bud Stems boggs.47 Sun, 09/11/2016 - 18:20
Small white masses appearing in late summer on redbud stems have become a common occurrence in recent years.  The masses look like a soft scale, mealybug, or perhaps an insect egg mass.  In fact, they are the sticky, frothy "egg plugs" of a treehopper and they may also be found on black walnut, wafer ash, and viburnum.
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Joe Boggs
Tree of the Week: Kentucky Coffeetree chatfield.1 Sun, 09/11/2016 - 16:47
  Kentucky coffeetree is a native tree that is planted as a tough urban survivor in streetscapes, and is tolerant of limey soils and tree pits (Chicago urban foresters list it as one of their five toughest street trees). It has a starkly coarse yet beautiful appearance in the winter landscape, and its fairly early fall defoliation and late spring foliation make it perfect if long seasons of sun penetration are desired.
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Jim Chatfield
Trees and Lightning stone.91 Sun, 09/11/2016 - 11:47

Recent storms that have moved through northwest Ohio have brought some much needed rain.  Some of that rain has been accompanied by lightning, high winds and even tornados.  The large oak pictured with this article was strike by lightning resulting in the outward symptom a "lightning scar." 

 

As I was searching for additional information when writing this article, I came across a FactSheet from Purdue University, Trees and Lightning.   It is an excellent resource and describes the range of damage to the tree that can occur during and after a lightning strike.  The...

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Amy Stone
Rare Caterpillar Attends 83rd Ohio Plant Diagnostic Workshop boggs.47 Sat, 09/10/2016 - 12:12
Thanks to the sharp eyes of Erik 'The Caterpillar Hunter' Draper (OSU Extension, Geauga County), this very rare caterpillar made an appearance at yesterday's 83rd Ohio Plant Diagnostic Workshop.  The Paddle Caterpillar is the larval form of the Funerary Dagger Moth (Acronicta funeralis, family Noctuidae).
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Joe Boggs
Mushrooms in the Yard: To Eat or Not to Eat has been a Common Question young.2 Thu, 09/08/2016 - 13:26

With the return of more regular rains in some areas of Ohio, mushroom production in lawns seems to be going gang busters.  Some view these mushrooms as a mere nuisance, some are freaked out by their presence, and some want to make a meal out of them.  STOP!  One must have an absolute, positive identification before dining on these "free" mushrooms.

 

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Curtis E. Young
Annual of the Week: Common Sunflower (Helianthus annuus). boggs.47 Thu, 09/08/2016 - 11:04
Common Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) is one of the most striking annual flowers in our landscapes, flower gardens, and agricultural fields.  The scientific name for the genus comes from the Greek helios which means "sun" and anthos which means "flower."
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Joe Boggs
Boogie-Woogie Aphid Takes Center Stage boggs.47 Thu, 09/08/2016 - 10:55
Over the years, the late-season Beech Blight Aphid (Grylloprociphilus imbricator) has waltzed through the pages of the BYGL on an annual basis.  The aphids have a single venue; they are only found on the twigs and branches of American beech (Fagus grandifolia). 
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Joe Boggs
Ode to Joy: A Walk in the Park and German VIllage chatfield.1 Wed, 09/07/2016 - 09:14

  The first image of a caladium and coleus window box above is from a walk I took a few weeks ago with the Ohio Nursery Landscape Association’s Executive Director Frits Risor through German Village and Schiller Park there, and then later in the day checking out the crape myrtles planted in landscapes a little further north near ONLA’s World Headquarters in Westerville. A few other items we saw include:

 

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Jim Chatfield

Cedar Rust Fungi Aecial Tubes Now Evident

  For the last month the fungal tubes of the “aecial” stage of several cedar rust fungi, namely cedar-apple rust (Gymonsporangium juniper-virginianae) and cedar-hawthorn rust (G. globosum) have been evident on leaf undersides of hawthorns, as seen in the accompanying picture.

  These rust fungi spend about a year and half on certain junipers (in the Cupressaceae family) before microscopic spores of the fungus oozing from galls on the juniper blow in the spring to certain genera in the Rosaceae family such as hawthorns and apples and crabapples.

 

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Jim Chatfield
Jack-o'-Lantern Mushrooms chatfield.1 Tue, 09/06/2016 - 12:17

  I was driving home the other day, and on a bank, under an oak tree, there were some electrifyingly-orange mushrooms cascading down a small slope. BYGL-alert screamed out at me, so let’s take a look. Delightful as they looked to the eye, these would seem to be jack-o’-lantern mushrooms, probably Omphalotus olearius. This mushroom may cause serious gastric distress to those who partake. It is a reminder that you really need to get a positive identification before taking a chance on nature gone wild.

 

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Jim Chatfield
Curtis E. Young
Mantids are Lurking boggs.47 Mon, 09/05/2016 - 14:37
This is the time of the year when it seems that praying mantids are everywhere.  I collected this mantid today from our window screen.  However, the perception that there are more mantids at this time of the season is based on the size of the mantids, not total numbers.
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Joe Boggs
Bounding Grasshoppers and Katydids boggs.47 Sat, 09/03/2016 - 10:14
While checking on the status of goldenrod bloom in a park in southwest Ohio yesterday, I kept finding myself surrounded by hordes of hop happy grasshoppers and katydids.  Each step that I took launched hundreds.
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Joe Boggs
Shrub of the Week: Northern Bayberry chatfield.1 Sat, 09/03/2016 - 00:15
  Northern bayberry (Myrica pensylvanica):  Very aromatic foliage, a great winter food source for birds, tolerates salt spray and poor soils, along with being a native, this certainly makes northern bayberry a consideration for many landscapes. 
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Jim Chatfield
Big Wheel Bugs are Rolling Along: Mea Culpa boggs.47 Fri, 09/02/2016 - 12:16
“Sometimes I lie awake at night, and ask, 'Where have I gone wrong?' Then a voice says to me, 'This is going to take more than one night.'”  (Charlie Brown).
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Joe Boggs
Tree of the Week: Seven-Son Flower chatfield.1 Fri, 09/02/2016 - 10:51

 The months-long florescent reign of seven-son flower, Heptacodium miconoides, is about to begin. The common name of this small tree (will grow to 15-20 feet or more) comes from the candelabra-like seven-pronged flower stalks.

  In northern Ohio the fragrant white flower petals are just now emerging from flower buds. After several weeks to a month the white petals, together called the corollas, will give way to a month or more of ripening ornamental salmon-pink sepals, the floral envelope behind the petal collectively called the calyces. It is a great sight against a blue...

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Jim Chatfield
Big Wheel Bugs are Rolling Along boggs.47 Fri, 09/02/2016 - 09:14
Wheel bugs (Arilus cristatus) have completed their development and adults of these large, unusual looking bugs are now lurking among the leaves of trees and shrubs in Ohio in search of prey.  Although caterpillars and sawfly larvae are favored table fare of this impressively large predator, they will not turn their beaks up at other arthropod meat morsels.
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Joe Boggs

Diagnostics: Canker on Heptacodium

  Today I met with OSU horticultural great Kenny Cochran at his garden in Wooster and we enjoyed checking out everything from his sweet cherry tomatoes to the two-toned leaves of his silver linden tree. One plant which gave us concern was a seven-son flower tree (Heptacodium miconoides). More on the tree later in an upcoming Tree of the Week post, but some stem dieback amidst the just-coming-into-flower panicles is what got our attention. Shoots with brown leaves amidst perfectly healthy-looking shoots with green leaves. 

 

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Jim Chatfield
A Spider Encounter boggs.47 Thu, 09/01/2016 - 19:01
I ran into this spider today; literally.  Not the very same spider.  I last saw that one scurrying away on the ground after dropping from the front of my shirt accompanied by some high-pitched sounds I didn't know I could make.  No doubt the mad spider would have also made noises - if it could - after I blundered through its beautifully constructed orb web.
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Joe Boggs
Woodland Plants of this Week: The Other Impatiens chatfield.1 Thu, 09/01/2016 - 10:41

   Two species of impatiens have carried on in eastern woodlands despite the roar of impatiens downy mildew on bedding impatiens in our landscapes.

There are some reports of their susceptibility to the downy mildew pathogen Plasmopara obducens, but it has not been reported on these species in Ohio. Woodland walkers are sure to recognize these other impatiens, though you may know them by other names, such as jewelweed or touch-me-nots. Their given Latin names are: Impatiens capensis, with orange flowers and Impatiens pallida, with pale yellow flowers....

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Jim Chatfield
Bagworms Tie One On. young.2 Thu, 09/01/2016 - 10:40
As summer draws to an end, many insects and mites approach the end of their seasonal activities as well. Curtis Young reports that the majority of common bagworms (Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis) have finished their destructive feeding as caterpillars in their individual bags, have tied their bags to their host plant, and are pupating (pupa=3rd stage of their life cycle).
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Curtis E. Young
Turf Tips - August 31, 2016 taylor.8 Thu, 09/01/2016 - 08:18
The heat and humidity have persisted in Ohio and the surrounding region, causing continued issues and concern for turfgrass managers. Don't panic...cooler temps are just around the corner!
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Joseph W. Rimelpsach
Leaf-Footed Bugs boggs.47 Wed, 08/31/2016 - 19:28
Leaf-footed bugs (family Coreidae) are rife with discrepancies.  They are collectively so-named because of the leaf-like expansions of their hind tibia, not their "feet" which are called tarsi (tarsus singular) and are the leg segments they actually walk on. 
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Joe Boggs
Milkweed Bugs are Rampant boggs.47 Wed, 08/31/2016 - 19:13
As common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) produces its signature spiny, oblong seed pods, milkweed bugs may show-up en mass to take advantage of the seed bounty. There are two species of bugs that feed on milkweed seed: the large milkweed bug (Oncopeltus fasciatus) and the small milkweed bug (Lygaeus kalmii).
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Joe Boggs
Annual of the Week - Coleus crook.46 Wed, 08/31/2016 - 14:16
Coleus (Solenostemon scutellaroides) is a versatile foliage plant that is prized for it's brightly colored, boldly patterned leaves in shades of red, orange, yellow, green, pink, purple, and white.  Adding coleus to your landscape makes an excellent color accent in garden beds and borders. It can also be planted in containers, window boxes, and hanging baskets.
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Julie Crook
PERRENIAL OF THE WEEK: Purple passionflower (Passiflora incarnata) boggs.47 Wed, 08/31/2016 - 13:12

Purple passionflower goes by several common names including true passionflower, wild passionflower, and wild passion vine as well as maypop and wild apricot which refer to the fruit.  This fast growing native perennial climbing/trailing vine sports two key features that should entice Ohio gardeners and landscape designers:  it produces beautifully complex eye-catching flowers that are 2 - 3" wide and it produces edible fruit.

 

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Joe Boggs
The Heart of Trees: Jaume Plensa at Toledo Museum of Art stone.91 Mon, 08/29/2016 - 23:17
If you find yourself in Toledo, Ohio before November 6, 2016, I recommend a visit to the Toledo Museum of Art to enjoy the Jaume Plensa: Human Landscape Exhibit.  Seven large outdoor sculptures, plus an indoor installation that includes a stainless steel curtain through which visitors can walk, will be on view through early November. 
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Amy Stone
Oak Wilt in NW Ohio stone.91 Mon, 08/29/2016 - 21:43

 

This summer, there have been several phone calls to the Extension office in Lucas County from concerned residents describing red oak trees declining quickly.  Many described their tree(s) exhibiting symptoms that one could suspect that oak wilt (Ceratocystis fagacearum) might be the cause.  The symptoms described included:  flagging of branches in the tree's canopy; withering of leaves that turn brown and ultimately drop before normal seasonal leaf drop; and rapid decline of the overall canopy - some describe it as happening "overnight".  Additionally,...

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Amy Stone
Nancy J. Taylor
NEW WOODLAND STEWARDS NEWSLETTER AVAILABLE ONLINE stone.91 Mon, 08/29/2016 - 21:13

The Ohio Woodland Stewards newsletter, Ohio Woodlands, Water and Wildlife, is produced three times a year.  It provides subcribers with updates on the latest issues related to woodland management, including insect and disease or invasive plant issues.  Articles are also geared towards expanding a readers knowledge base on a wide variety of topics related to our Ohio woodlands and the management and care of them.  Subscribers can access the newsletter online at any time.  When new issues are released it is available in either hard copy or electronic - just let us know which version...

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Amy Stone
Oak Itch Mites Attack! shetlar.1 Mon, 08/29/2016 - 13:13

Folks in Northeastern Ohio complain of itchy welts on their heads, neck and upper torso. The oak itch mite, Pyemotes herfsi, has been identified as the culprit.

The last time Ohio suffered an outbreak was in 2008 in the Cincinnati area. At that time, walkers, joggers and cyclists were complaining that when they followed trails that were overhung by oak trees, they would end up with itchy welts the following day. At that time, the oak itch mite had been recorded as being a periodic pest from Nebraska to Texas and eastward to Tennessee. The bites were most common in July and...

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Dave Shetlar
Clean Up Lace Bug Infestations now! shetlar.1 Mon, 08/29/2016 - 12:39

Lace bugs are persisting on many trees and shrubs! Consider controlling them to keep the adults from overwintering and repeating the damage next year!

I noticed several hawthorns this week that have been turned yellow by continual lace bug attack this summer. In fact, some trees are beginning to drop leaves. Upon looking closely, there were numerous adult lace bug still on the leaves. The undersurface of each leaf was coated with tar spots (the fecal spots produced by lace bugs), old egg shells and cast skins. Remember that the lace bug species that infest deciduous trees (i.e.,...

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Dave Shetlar
THE WEEKLY WEED: Canadian Horseweed (Conyza canadensis) boggs.47 Sun, 08/28/2016 - 19:15

Canadian horseweed (Conyza canadensis, family Asteraceae) has become notorious in recent years for failing to respond to glyphosate (e.g. Roundup) in agricultural fields and landscapes.  This annual weed, which is also known as just horseweed, Canadian fleabane, coltstail, and marestail, has moved in recent years from being a plague in field crops to become a scourge in landscapes and nurseries.  Indeed, this native North America plant has become such a problem in Ohio it has been added to the state's noxious weeds list.

 

Challenges with managing this weed centers...

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Joe Boggs
Cryptomeria Scale (Fried-Egg Scale) Found in Southwest Ohio boggs.47 Sun, 08/28/2016 - 17:59

Last week, Cindy Meyer (OSU Extension, Butler County) and I found Cryptomeria Scale (Aspidiotus cryptomeriae) on Canaan fir in a Christmas tree farm in southwest Ohio. The literature indicates this non-native armored scale may be found on the underside of needles on a wide range of conifers including true firs (Abies spp.), Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziensii), hemlocks (Tsuga spp.), spruces (Picea spp.), and perhaps other conifers as well as Taxus (Taxus spp.).  However, it appears that cryptomeria scale has a distinct preference for...

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Joe Boggs
Cindy Meyer
Shrub of the Week: Chinese Leptodermis chatfield.1 Sun, 08/28/2016 - 16:48

{This Shrub of the Week article and its photos are from Paul Snyder of OSU's Secrest Arboretum at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster.}

  Have you ever had someone come to you looking for a particular plant, and then begin listing all the characteristics they are looking for? “It needs to be dwarf, have lots of flowers all summer, not be messy, and it can’t have thorns…” We have all been there, and we have all thought “With all those requirements you can’t really grow anything but perhaps poison ivy.”

  We often receive questions like this at...

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Jim Chatfield
Tree of the Week: Three-Flowered Maple chatfield.1 Sun, 08/28/2016 - 10:30

  The three-flowered maple continues to grow and thrive in my backyard and the more I see it planted at the Secrest Arboretum in Wooster, at the High Line Park in New York City, and elsewhere, the more I enjoy this tree. This Asian maple will become a small to medium-sized  tree (20-25 feet). Like its cousin paperbark maple, it has exfoliating bark but the bark is not as papery or with the cinnamon color of Acer griseum.

 

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Jim Chatfield

Pear Rust Revisited

  While walking in German Village in Columbus with ONLA’s Frits Risor last week we revisited the Callery pears with rust disease noted earlier this season (http://bygl.osu.edu/node/342). I wanted to see if the rust was isolated to the two trees heavily affected in June. As earlier, the two trees in question were speckled with bright orange lesions on the upper leaf surfaces, but I suspected that by now the rust fungus would have undergone sexual reproduction in the leaves with aecial spore pustules developing  on the lower leaf surfaces as would be seen with the cedar-apple rust fungus (...

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Jim Chatfield
Smorgas-gourd chatfield.1 Sat, 08/27/2016 - 15:21

  “I am ignorant of almost everything” is a favorite saying of mine, and truth be told it is an obvious truth for us all. It is what makes us so lucky to be plant lovers, since we are reminded with the new personal and universal discoveries of Nature every single day.  Know-it-alls need not apply for attendance at Nature’s banquets – though they might learn the most.  One of my recent revelations of a horticultural bent was about – gourds.  I have seen them, and have a vague sense that they are cucurbits, that is that they are in the Cucurbitaceae, the family that also includes...

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Jim Chatfield
Red-Spotted Purple boggs.47 Fri, 08/26/2016 - 09:20
Look closely at woodland edges and you may see a flicker of iridescent blues accented with splashes of red; the calling card of a red-spotted purple butterfly (Limenitis arthemis astyanax).  The red-spotted purple is so named because of its overall purple hue and for the red to orangish-red spots on the underside of the wings.
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Joe Boggs
Wee Beasties chatfield.1 Wed, 08/24/2016 - 15:52
  During the course of this summer a number of beasts of various sizes have passed by my lens. These often turn into bygl-alerts, for example 17-year cicadas and monarch butterflies. A few have not qualified – until now. Here are just a few beauties of the summer bestiary.
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Jim Chatfield
Come To Secrest on September 9: Third Notice chatfield.1 Wed, 08/24/2016 - 12:18
The 83rd Ohio Plant Diagnostics Workshop: September 9!  New diseases. Old insects. Plant ID challenges. Becoming more alert to BYGL. And ODA, ONLA and ISA credits, including Core pesticide credits with ODA for the added talk of “Why Pesticide Labels Matter…for Plant Diagnostics.”
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Jim Chatfield

Tar Spots of Maple

  Tar spots of maple, caused by species of the Rhytisma fungus, are prominent now, although mostly not as severe as in wetter summers. There are two different tar spot diseases of maple, one affecting silver and red maples, caused by Rhytisma acerinum, resulting in dense, tarry spots that truly reflect the “tar” spot name (first picture below).
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Jim Chatfield
Yes, We Have The Bananas chatfield.1 Mon, 08/22/2016 - 12:10

  I have marveled this summer about the impact of modern petunias in hanging baskets, planters, and planting beds in communities in Ohio and elsewhere. When I talk to landscapers such as Gene Pouly in Orrville about these petunias, they agree that petunias are indeed a boon to these sites, but they almost always add that there can be so much more to urban plantings. So, here is one of Gene’s planters, with the range of additional plants he uses outside Smith Dairy in Orrville, Ohio.  

 

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Jim Chatfield
Slime Mold Sighting chatfield.1 Sat, 08/20/2016 - 00:58

  While walking about the other day I came upon a scene of serial sliming. A slime mold, probably a species of Mucilaga, was colonizing mulch under a maple tree. It was also colonizing a fallen maple leaf. It was also colonizing turfgrass plants next to the mulched area. This cohort of the colonized should tell us something: this slime mold is not very particular. It is not a parasite of this maple leaf or the turfgrass, but is just feeding on microbes in the decayed organic matter.  So no harm, no foul, relative to the need for controls. Just rake it or wash it off if it offends...

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Jim Chatfield
Curtis E. Young
Lace Bug Damage Very Evident Throughout Ohio boggs.47 Fri, 08/19/2016 - 13:12

Extensioneers throughout Ohio have reported high lace bug populations this season.  It is speculated these small sucking insects may have benefited from hot, dry conditions that may be coming to an end; for now.  The most obvious lace bugs include:  basswood lace bug (Gargaphia tiliae), hawthorn lace bug (Corythucha cydoniae), oak lace bug (C. arcuata), and sycamore lace bug (C. incurvata).

 

These lace bug species live on the undersides of leaves where they use their piercing/sucking mouth parts to suck juices from their host plants.  As...

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Joe Boggs
A Tomato A Day - Live Smart Ohio Blog stone.91 Fri, 08/19/2016 - 08:44

Extension is an educational resource like no other.  If you are a BYGL reader, you already are familiar with the horticulture related information that Ohioans, and beyond, have access to via the timely BYGL alerts,  the weekly BYGL summaries, and of course the BYGL website.  Sometimes there are topics that clearly overlap in our program areas and provide an opportunity for cross programmatic planning and promotion of the four Extension program areas:  Agriculture and Natural Resources (which includes horticulture); Community Development; 4-H Youth Development; and Family Consumer Sciences...

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Amy Stone
Tree Of The Week: Let Us Take A Look chatfield.1 Thu, 08/18/2016 - 16:29

  This week let us do some sleuthing. I came upon this tree yesterday in Orrville, Ohio in the Smucker’s Fitness Walk path. The leaf told me something, but first, let us look at the tell-tale terminal buds: clustered. 

  This is typical of oaks, the genus Quercus.  

  And the leaves obviously suggest oak-hood, in this case with rounded lobes without a bristle tip, thus the…

  White oak group

  Oaks in the white oak group tend to hybridize freely, unlike with the black or red oak group (pin oaks, black oaks, scarlet...

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Jim Chatfield
Shrub of the Week: David's Mountainlaurel chatfield.1 Thu, 08/18/2016 - 15:18

{This post was written and images provided by Joe Cochran, curator of OSU’s Secrest Arboretum at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center at Wooster; end note from Jim Chatfield}

  Sophora davidii, David’s mountainlaurel or David’s pagoda tree, formerly known as  S. viciifolia, is a multi-stemmed deciduous shrub from the Sichuan region of China. It was discovered by the Jesuit missionary, Jean Pierre Armand David (1826-1900). Among his many plant discoveries, Père David is also known for introducing to the West, the giant panda. It was in this same...

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Jim Chatfield
What is the Threat from Stinging Caterpillars? boggs.47 Wed, 08/17/2016 - 16:20

The vast majority of lepidopteron (moths and butterflies) caterpillars, even many with hairs, do not present a threat.  However, there are some with hairs that are modified for defense.  These are collectively called urticating hairs from the Latin urtica meaning "nettle."  Indeed, the hairs on stinging nettle (Urtica dioica), which are called trichomes; provide a good model for the venom injecting mechanism used by some of the more serious urticating hairs found on caterpillars.

 

...

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Joe Boggs
Beneficial of the Week: THe Dull Roar Effect chatfield.1 Wed, 08/17/2016 - 14:27

  The importance of beneficial insects and mites is often missed.  Until they are missed. We learned this years ago when “cover sprays” that included multiple pesticides in a “cocktail” were used repeatedly in hopes of controlling a range of pests, but had the unintended consequence of reducing or eliminating beneficial insect, mite, and spider species. 

Without these beneficials, we created monsters such as spider mite infestations on burningbush euonymus, that were much worse when cover sprays reduced beneficials.  We lost the “dull roar” effect of these beneficials that, while...

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Jim Chatfield
Joe Boggs

The Reddened Rose of Texas

“Rose rosette is an epidemic, and North Texas is the epicenter,” said David Forehand of the Dallas Arboretum: “This is a game changer for roses, I’m sad to say.” This was in a July article in the Fort Worth Star-Telegram by Sara Bahari, reflecting the anguish felt by Texans regarding the demise of so many of their beloved rose gardens.
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Jim Chatfield
Beneficial Insects: Wool Carder Bees kulhanek.5 Mon, 08/15/2016 - 16:21

Wool carder bees in the genus Anthidium are a beneficial pollinator that may be less familiar to pollinator-promoters than honeybees or bumblebees, but they are well-worth knowing!

 

This little bee is full of determination.  Female wool carder bees collect wooly material to line their nests.  To do this, she uses her mandibles to scrape fuzzy trichomes from pubescent leaves, especially lambs ear.  This scraping motion is reminiscent of a time when wool would be combed or "carded" to straighten the fibers.  While she toils away collecting soft, fuzzy things for her...

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Ashley Kulhanek
Perennial of the Week: Rattlesnake Master kulhanek.5 Mon, 08/15/2016 - 13:33

No snake charmers here, just a native perennial that is worth a try in a garden as a tall statement piece for pollinators!

 

Rattlesnake Master is full of surprises.  It looks like it belongs in a desert, but it is actually a native prairie plant that grows well in the midwest.  While its basal foliage resembles that of a yucca (lily family), it is actually a member of the carrot family, Apiaceae.  It's flowers are a pollinator dream and its height adds something unique to the garden.  

 

The plant begins with prickly, stiff basal foliage.  The bluish-green...

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Ashley Kulhanek
Great Golden Digger Wasp: The Other Soil Burrower boggs.47 Mon, 08/15/2016 - 13:18

Great Golden Digger Wasps (Sphex ichneumoneus) rival Cicada Killer Wasps (Sphecius speciosus) in size, soil excavating capacity, and heavy lifting.  In fact, research on the foraging capacity of the Golden Digger showed this wasp's heavy lifting capacity exceeded that of the Cicada Killer; it was significantly higher than 15 other hymenopteran heavy lifters.*  Yet, when most people think of big wasp bombers, they think of the Cicada Killer.  That's because Cicada Killers occur in larger numbers and their nesting habits often place them in conflict with people.  Golden...

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Joe Boggs
Ailanthus Webworm Nests boggs.47 Mon, 08/15/2016 - 11:08

Ailanthus Webworms (Atteva aurea) feed exclusively on the non-native, highly invasive, misleadingly named Tree of Heaven (Ailanthus altissima).  They are the larval (caterpillar) stage of a beautiful ermine moth (Family Yponomeutidae).  In my opinion, this is one of the most beautiful moths found in Ohio.  Multiple overlapping generations occur each season so it is common to find both moths and caterpillars active at the same time.  Indeed, I took pictures posted with this report of the moth on stiff goldenrod (Solidago rigida) the same day that I took shots of...

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Joe Boggs
Robbers are on the Wing! boggs.47 Sat, 08/13/2016 - 14:15

One of my favorite insects is the Red-Footed Cannibalfly (Promachus rufipes) which is a type of robber fly (family Asilidae).  Few carnivorous insects can match the amazing acrobatics and predatory proficiency of robber flies in their pursuit of prey.  Adults of all species are predators and they will attack a variety of insects; even "armed" prey and insects much larger than their own body size.  One of the appropriately named Hanging Thief Robber Flies (Diogmites spp.) pictured below is chowing down on a yellowjacket.  There are over a thousand species of robber flies...

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Joe Boggs
New OSU FactSheet Online - Viburnum Leaf Beetle (VLB) stone.91 Thu, 08/11/2016 - 06:52

There is a new Ohio State University Extension FactSheet that you must check out.  The FactSheet covers the Viburnum Leaf Beetle, an invasive species from Europe and Asia.  Curtis Young, Extension Educator in VanWert County, authored this FactSheet that can be found online at http://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/anr-39

 

The FactSheet includes information on:  Host Plants; VLB Identification; VLB Life Cycle and Plant Injury; Management Strategies; and VLB Spread. 

 

While this insect was first discovered in...

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Amy Stone
Caladiscopic Majesty chatfield.1 Wed, 08/10/2016 - 22:45

  Years ago, OSU Agriculture College Dean Bobby Moser wanted the Ag Quad next to Howlett and Kottman Halls to be planted so that football fans would not park cars there on fall Saturdays. The solution, led by Professor Claudio Pasian may be seen in all its colors and textures now with the OSU Extension Horticulture Trial Gardens. One of the many standouts of those trials that I noted last week were a range of cultivars of Caladium. Hearts and arrows of patterned and freckled leaves of intense colors, about 18 inches tall and wide. Wow: ‘Fiesta’ and “Burning Heart’. ‘Pearl’ and ‘...

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Jim Chatfield
Annual of the Week: Euphorbia 'Diamond Frost' boggs.47 Wed, 08/10/2016 - 20:53

Euphorbia is a genus in the family Euphorbiaceae; however, not all Euphorbia are equal.  Sometimes, the genes that support a plants demotion to weed status such as the ability to thrive in high heat and drought may be coaxed through hybridization to produce well-behaved, highly prized landscape plants.  Such is the case with Euphorbia 'Diamond Frost'.  This is a very tough plant that not only survives the dog-days of summer; but thrives!  All the while, the naturally mounded plants continue to be topped with clouds of delicate white flowers.

 

...

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Joe Boggs
Weekly Weed: Spurge boggs.47 Wed, 08/10/2016 - 20:47

Two types of spurge belonging to the genus, Euphorbia (family Euphorbiaceae), may become a problem at this time of the year in landscapes and turfgrass.  These are prostrate spurge (E. prostrata) and spotted spurge (E. maculata).  Both are summer annuals meaning that they develop throughout the growing season and produce seeds in late summer to early fall.  Both may flourish by lack of competition presented by poorly maintained or drought stressed turfgrass, or by the lack of weed suppression through poor mulching practices in landscapes.

 

...

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Joe Boggs
Woody of the Week - Rising Sun Redbud stone.91 Wed, 08/10/2016 - 18:46

Cercis canadensis Rising Sun™ is a brilliantly colored selection of the eastern redbud.  Its newly emerging foliage in the spring is shades of apricot-orange, maturing to yellow, turning to speckled lime-green in summer, and then changing to rich golden tones for autumn.  Its foliage lights up a garden and is a real eye catcher. 

 

Prior to leafing out in the spring, lavender pea-like flowers open along the trunk and branches lasting for several weeks. The heart shaped leaves follow the not only beautiful, but edible flowers too.  If you have not tried redbud...

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Amy Stone
Perennial of the Week: Mountain Mint crook.46 Wed, 08/10/2016 - 15:31

Mountain mint (Pycnanthemum muticum) is blooming now and is covered with a spectacular variety of butterflies, bees, and wasps.  This plant is also called short-toothed mountain mint or clustered mountain mint.  It is a clump-forming perennial that typically grows 2 - 3’ tall. It is native to Ohio where it typically grows in grassy open places, meadows, fields, and woodland areas.

This plant was used by Native Americans for the treatment of fevers, colds, stomach aches, and other minor physical ailments. Mountain Mint is easily grown in full sun to part shade with moist to...

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Julie Crook
Diagnosis: The Fire Not This Time chatfield.1 Wed, 08/10/2016 - 00:52

  While driving through Mahoning County in northeast Ohio this weekend I stopped to take some pictures of what looked to be fireblight on crabapple (Malus). About a foot of the new growth on the crabapple had died back, with browned leaves attached. As noted in previous bygl-alerts, bacterial fireblight caused by Erwinia amylovora is a common problem on crabapples and apples and other genera in the Rosaceae, such as Sorbus (mountainash), Cotoneaster, Pyracantha, and Pyrus (Callery and fruiting pears). As I looked a little closer, though, I...

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Jim Chatfield
September 9: 83rd Ohio Plant Diagnostic Workshop chatfield.1 Tue, 08/09/2016 - 16:17

  Hey, where have I been? What happened to the 82nd Workshop, scheduled in Wooster on September 9? Well, we are so enmeshed in “all diagnostics – all the  time” that we have already migrated to #83. Just last Friday there were 70+ Woodland Stewards in Mansfield, Joe Boggs continues his BYGLive! Diagnostic Workshops in southwest Ohio each month (coming as well to central Ohio next year), bygl-alerts are constantly talking diagnostics, and on and on. But you can never get enough diagnostic training and perspectives, as we realize every time we go outside or check out another new website....

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Jim Chatfield
Shrub of the Week: 'Phantom' Hydrangea chatfield.1 Mon, 08/08/2016 - 21:13

{This bygl-alert is from Joe Cochran, Director of OSU’s Secrest Arboretum. We will soon get his name in the alert author listings.}

  Introduced by Pieter Zwinenburg, Boskoop, Netherlands in 1990, Hydrangea paniculata ‘Phantom’, in my opinion, is one of the best panicle hydrangeas on the market.  The name ‘Phantom’ comes from the pristine, white blossoms that adorn this plant. In June, the inflorescences begin as lime-green, transitioning to a creamy-white and by July have developed into massive, pure white flower clusters. These panicles, up to 15 inches long, are quite...

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Jim Chatfield
Turnabout is Fair Prey boggs.47 Mon, 08/08/2016 - 19:26

Some of my best photographs were totally unplanned; a nod to the adage, "it's better to be lucky than good."  During today's S.W. Ohio Diagnostic Walk-About, I was photographing paper wasps and mud dauber nests under the walkway leading to the Tree House when I saw a dark blue wasp saunter into a spider web.  It seemed odd; was the wasp committing insecticide?  The drama was unfolding 6 - 7 ft. from my camera lens, so I couldn't see details.

 

The true story emerged when I processed the image on my computer.  The wasp wasn't becoming the spider's prey; it was the other way...

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Joe Boggs
Important Gypsy Moth Info! stone.91 Mon, 08/08/2016 - 06:41

While the feeding damage of gypsy moth caterpillars has been done for some time, the egg masses that are present now can predict what the future holds and what populations are expected to do in 2017.  Egg masses laid this year are tan and felt-like in appearance (upper egg mass in the photo).  Older egg masses are faded and much lighter in color and appear weathered (lower egg mass in the photo). 

 

If you are interested in learning more about the Ohio Department of Agriculture's (ODA) Gypsy Moth Suppression Program check out their website at...

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Amy Stone
Annual of the Week: Portulaca (Moss Rose) boggs.47 Sun, 08/07/2016 - 18:02

Portulaca has become my re-discovered, new favorite annual flowering plant.  My wife sowed seed six years ago in our Portulaca-planter shown in this photo; it hasn't been re-seeded or re-planted since.  The planter is setting on our driveway with a southern exposure and gets watered when I think of it which isn't very often.  Over the past four weeks, we've had inconsistent rainfall at our home and day after day of 85 F. or better; many days in the 90s.  The plants are thriving and have never looked better!

 

...

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Joe Boggs
2016 Ohio Local Foods Week stone.91 Sun, 08/07/2016 - 18:00

Information for this post was provided by OSU Extension Educators Patrice Powers-Barker and Heather Neikirk, Co-Leaders of the OSU Extension Local Foods Signature Program. 

 

Join Ohioans from across the state in a celebration of local foods August 7-13, 2016. OSU Extension educators are working with communities to showcase their local food producers through special events and educational programs.

 

Why Ohio Local Foods Week?

  • Agriculture is Ohio’s number one industry contributing jobs for one in seven Ohioans, and more...
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Amy Stone
Sneak A Zucchini On A Neighbor's Porch stone.91 Sun, 08/07/2016 - 17:29

If you have ever grown zucchini, you know that it can be pretty prolific.  There are usually summer days that you could eat it at every meal - and there would still be extras.  So what to do with all the excess?  Why not share it with neighbors, friends, family, or others in your community in need. 

 

Here is a fun way to start the sharing.  August 8 is National Sneak A Zucchini On Your Neighbor's Porch.  Have you ever celebrated?  Don't let another year go by without participating.  Although the day says "porch," but why not try desk or office?  Extra produce can also be...

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Amy Stone
Redheads in Southwest Ohio boggs.47 Sun, 08/07/2016 - 15:04
Southern and central Ohio do not appear to be experiencing an "outbreak" of our native fall webworm (Hyphantria cunea) this season.  However, I'm seeing some relatively high localized populations and this lead to a surprising discovery of red-headed webworms in southwest Ohio.
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Joe Boggs
Tree of the Week: RIver BIrch chatfield.1 Sat, 08/06/2016 - 17:44

  In choosing river birch (Betula nigra), it is perhaps wishful thinking or imagining a more moderate summer, since as this tree’s name suggests droughty conditions are not preferred. River birch will survive our dry summer throughout much of Ohio this year, but leaf drop and poor color now in some cases reminds us to plant it in sites that provide moist, well-drained, acid soils with plenty of organic matter.   

 

...

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Jim Chatfield
Spittlebug on Walnut and Frothy Thinking boggs.47 Sat, 08/06/2016 - 12:38

I posted a BYGL Alert! about spittlebugs on hackberry ("Odd Spittlebug on Hackberry") yesterday.  I could have added another odd spittlebug to the post - and solved an old misconception - had I waited until later in the day to write the report.  Yesterday afternoon I came across the tell-tale frothy masses of a spittlebug on black walnut (Juglans nigra) while hiking around Miami Whitewater Forest - Great Parks of Hamilton County.  The spittle-masses were located on the twigs and in the leaf axils.  Oddly, the consistency of the froth was much like the spittle-masses...

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Joe Boggs
Diagnosis: Broad Mites on Hydrangea chatfield.1 Sat, 08/06/2016 - 10:36

  I visited a nursery this past Thursday morning. Problem: Unidentified damage on hydrangea liners - severe leaf distortion and plant stunting, resembling herbicide injury, but this hypothesis made no sense given grower expertise and practices and the spatial relationship of affected plants. The picture above illustrates the difference between normal and affected hydrangeas. One mistake I made: I did not take out my hand lens.  Left samples at OSU-Plant Pathology by Thursday afternoon.

Diagnosis: Received e-mailed results from...

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Jim Chatfield
Odd Spittlebug on Hackberry boggs.47 Fri, 08/05/2016 - 09:51
During Wednesday's diagnostic walk-about in Shawnee Lookout - Great Parks of Hamilton County, Kathy Smith (OSU Extension Program Director - Forestry), spotted an unusual spittlebug on common hackberry (Celtis occidentalis).  The spittlebug nymphs were confined to the stems of the fruit (drupe); we could find none feeding anywhere else on two heavily infested trees.
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Joe Boggs
Kathy Smith
Yellownecked Caterpillars Rear Their Heads and Other End boggs.47 Thu, 08/04/2016 - 20:58

Thanks to the sharp eyes of Lenny Farlee (Extension Forester, Purdue University), the congregated yellownecked caterpillar (Datana ministra) colony shown in this picture was discovered yesterday during a diagnostic walk-about he, Kathy Smith (OSU Extension Program Director - Forestry), and I lead in Shawnee Lookout Park in southwest Ohio.  You may recognize the genus, Datana, because we've had a bumper crop of walnut caterpillars (D. integerrima) this season (see Alert on July 15, 2016, "Walnut Caterpillars on the Prowl").

 

...

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Joe Boggs
NEW OSU Extension Soil Testing Fact Sheet boggs.47 Thu, 08/04/2016 - 15:26
What is causing the odd leaf chlorosis on this red maple?  Regardless of what you think is causing the symptom, it's only a guess unless you soil test.  Soil tests provide you with information that serves the same purposes as the information that blood tests provide to physicians:  soil tests are like a blood test for the soil.
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Joe Boggs
Jim Chatfield
Cindy Meyer

Elm Yellows: The Re-Emergence of an Old Killer

Jim Chatfield and I visited the USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station, in Delaware, OH, on Monday where they are waging a battle to eliminate Elm Yellows (EY) from their American Elm Restoration Project research plots.  I last saw the disease in southwest Ohio in 2013. 

The problem is that American elms (Ulmus americana) that are resistant to Dutch Elm Disease (DED) have no known resistance to Elm Yellows (EY).  DED is caused by a fungal infection; EY is caused by a phytoplasma which is a type of bacterium.  DED fungi plug the xylem.  The EY phytoplasma...

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Joe Boggs
Jim Chatfield
One Month Early! Gray Leaf Spot on Perennial Ryegrass Alert taylor.8 Thu, 08/04/2016 - 10:47
Gray Leaf Spot has been confirmed on perennial ryegrass in Ohio! On Friday July 29, 2016 two cases of the disease were confirmed in the Clinic. This is at least a month earlier than normally detected in Ohio. Both cases were in central Ohio and at sites that have had a history of the disease. This can be a very destructive disease to ryegrass, both annual and perennial. To date this is only a serious disease on ryegrasses in the Midwest.
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Nancy J. Taylor
A Mitey Big Disaster draper.15 Thu, 08/04/2016 - 08:49

Often, one of the typical options offered when attempting to control an identified pest, is to simply do nothing!  In this year of extremely hot, dry conditions in NE Ohio, deciding to not do anything about a pest, turned into a disaster.  The pest involved was the two-spotted spider mite, which was happily feeding on tomatoes growing in a high tunnel.

 

...
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Erik Draper
Summer Days of Wineberries and Rosaceae chatfield.1 Wed, 08/03/2016 - 22:21
  As my wife and I walked through the Virginia woods in Shenandoah National Park last week I realized once again, that I knew less than I thought about a familiar genus – Rubus, a member of the Rosaceae family of related genera. My favorite is Rubus occidentalis,
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Jim Chatfield
Joe-Pye Weed crook.46 Wed, 08/03/2016 - 13:52
Many people think Joe-Pye weed (Eutrochium purpureum)is nothing more than a roadside weed and have never taken in to consideration its outstanding ornamental characteristics.  It is a large plant which needs space, but when planted in mass it can provide exceptional flowering and provide height when needed in the landscape.
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Julie Crook
Lily Has Everyone Seeing Stars draper.15 Tue, 08/02/2016 - 18:40

Every year in NE Ohio at the Drapescape, my wife and I anticipate being able to sit out on our deck and gaze upon the stars in the middle of the day.  How is this possible you ask?  Easily answered.  Because we are both enjoying the emergence of our favorite oriental hybrid lily, which is in bloom right now, called Lilium orientalis ‘Stargazer’ or commonly known as the Stargazer lily.

 

...
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Erik Draper
Emerald Ash Borer Update stone.91 Tue, 08/02/2016 - 11:14

 

While on our BYGL Conference Call earlier today, I received the monthly Emerald Ash Borer email update which includes a map that includes the latest changes of EAB detections in North America.  A shout out to Douglas Bopp, GIS Support Northeast Area with USDA APHIS PPQ who regularly sends this information out to communicate the latest information. 

 

Changes and/or additions included in this map since the July 1, 2016 map are as follows: The addition of initial county detections in: Vanderburgh County, IN; Harrison, Van Buren and Washington Counties,...

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Amy Stone
Hibiscus Hyperventilation! draper.15 Mon, 08/01/2016 - 14:44

As I was driving through a local neighborhood this morning, I stopped at a stop sign and as I started to pull through the intersection, I saw massive, pink blooms that had me hyperventilating!  The sun was just at the right angle that the Hibiscus moscheutos (a.k.a. Hardy Hibiscus, Rose or Swamp Mallow), just popped out of a drab seeming lifeless, dry landscape!  I couldn’t resist that vibrant splash of color so I had to drive around the block, park, walk nonchalantly along the sidewalk and then casually slip into the yard to get a picture, without getting bitten by a dog!

...
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Erik Draper

Spider Mite Problems Just Keep Coming!

While finally getting around to mulching my perennial beds this weekend, I noticed more spider mite damage on one of my species of Hosta. I am not sure which cultivar it is as it's one that was handed down from generation to generation. i love it because it has beautiful fragrant flowers, but this weekend the foliage was looking a little rough and spotted.
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Pam Bennett
Milkweeds: Asclepias and Asclepius chatfield.1 Sun, 07/31/2016 - 20:21

  I was moved by my friend Joe Boggs post about oleander aphids on milkweeds (Asclepias spp.) to add a little to the mix, mainly because I wrote earlier about butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa) and because I took a number of pictures of milkweeds in the past few weeks and in previous years. They are quite beautiful with their reflexed corolla (group of petals) and elaborate horn and hood structures, their silky fibers (coma) used for life preserver flotation in World War II and pillows and comforters today, and for their relationship with Monarch butterflies.

 ...

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Jim Chatfield
The Right Thing To The Root chatfield.1 Sun, 07/31/2016 - 13:41

A tree's leaves may be ever so good,

So may its bark, so may its wood;

 

  I picture right now my colleague Joe Boggs trying to relax on this Sunday afternoon as I add this bygl-alert, casually opening the post, and as he reads through it, realizes that I am baiting him to elaborate upon this short teaser. He is the lead author and chief champion of the newly updated “Soil Testing for Ohio Lawns, Landscapes, Fruit Crops, and Vegetable Gardens” Fact Sheet that is now available online from OSU Extension at:

http://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/...

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Jim Chatfield
Joe Boggs
Diagnostic Double-Take: Scorch or Scab chatfield.1 Sat, 07/30/2016 - 16:34
  Last Friday, outside our bank in Orrville, Ohio, I espied a crabapple tree with a carpet of brown leaves underneath the tree. On first glance, I imagined this to be due to leaf scorch and then leaf drop due to recent dry weather. After all, we are almost eight inches below normal over the past three months in many northeast Ohio areas. Made sense. I was simply following Question #4 of the 20 Questions of Plant Diagnostics: What Do You See That Looks Abnormal?
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Jim Chatfield
Yellowjackets are Buzzing boggs.47 Sat, 07/30/2016 - 09:48

Yellowjackets (Vespula spp. and Dolichovespula spp.) are beneficial insects.  Just keep repeating that to yourself when you're chased or stung by these yellow and black marauders!  Yellowjackets have actually been with us since the beginning of the season.  Each nest was started by a single overwintered queen.  However, this is the time of the season when the ever-expanding nests contain enough individuals for yellowjackets to start making their presence known … sometimes painfully.

 

All species of yellowjackets in Ohio build circular to oblong...

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Joe Boggs
Aphids Spoiling Monarch Milkweeds boggs.47 Fri, 07/29/2016 - 19:12

During yesterday's OSU Master Gardener Volunteer Diagnostic Workshop in Licking County, OH, one of the participants asked about the hordes of yellow aphids sucking juices from common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) reserved for monarch butterfly caterpillars.  These are oleander aphids (Aphis nerii) and their appearance reminds us that nature makes no food reservations.

 

...

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Joe Boggs
Tree of the Week: Sassafras chatfield.1 Fri, 07/29/2016 - 10:51

  Sassafras (Sassafras albidum) is a lovely native woodland tree which is used more and more in landscaping. It is typically a medium-sized tree up to 30-50 feet in height but the national champion in Kentucky exceeds 100 feet. Leaves are variable, some entire, some mitten-liked and two-lobed, some three-lobed. Fall color can range from attractive yellows to yellow-orange, especially effective as a grove of sassafras trees.

...

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Jim Chatfield
Ghostly Ericoid chatfield.1 Fri, 07/29/2016 - 09:33
John Muir wrote: “When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe.” This is certainly true of so much of what we see as horticulturists and plant lovers, from insects that induce plants to turn genes on and off and thus produce galls, to the cedar apple rust fungus that traverses its two-year life cycle in obligatory cycling between junipers and rosaceous plants.
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Jim Chatfield
What Is In My Bluebird House?? titchenell.4 Thu, 07/28/2016 - 10:33
Despite the name 'bluebird house', eastern bluebirds are not the only species that call those little wooden boxes home. Bluebird houses (hereafter called bluebird nest boxes) are also used by tree swallows, chickadees, house wrens, and house sparrows. All of the aforementioned species are cavity nesters, meaning they build their nests in cavities, whether naturally occurring (in trees) or man-made (in nest boxes).
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Marne Titchenell
Cedar Quince Rust Rages chatfield.1 Wed, 07/27/2016 - 23:38

  Christmas In July: Some hawthorns these past two weeks are sporting little orange sherbet-colored aecial spore masses of the cedar quince rust fungus (Gymnosporangium clavipes), pushing out from the haws. I am receiving many calls about this and, Frits Rizor, the Executive Director of the Ohio Nursery and Landscape Association, even sent me a text and image the other day – we are all plant pathologists!

...

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Jim Chatfield
Insects Need Water Too! kulhanek.5 Wed, 07/27/2016 - 20:21

A homeowner called the Extension office after noticing bees or yellow jackets were repeatedly visiting a small koi pond in the yard.  What was going on?  Well, insects, like all of us, need water too!  

Many insects receive water from nectar or via their prey, but honeybees, bumblebees, wasps, and many other insects visit dewy leaves, mud puddles, bird baths, pools, pet water bowls, or even decorative koi ponds to refuel their H2O needs, especially in hot, dry weather.  Bees can use water to regulate humidity in the hive and for evaporative cooling. Butterflies are often seen...

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Ashley Kulhanek
Beetles on the Potatoes in the Garden stone.91 Wed, 07/27/2016 - 19:33

While out looking at an oak tree earlier today in Lucas County, the property owner asked if I wanted to see his vegetable gardens - YES gardens!  Corn, tomatoes, green beans, zucchini, potatoes and more! 

 

The potatoes where being hit pretty hard by the feeding of the Colorado potato beetles (Leptinotarsa decemlineata) - both the adult and the larvae were present.  

 

The homeowner had been hand picking but losing the battle so I joined in for a bit.  There were many more eating to their hearts content in his several rows as he continued to "take...

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Amy Stone
Flatlining Linden chatfield.1 Wed, 07/27/2016 - 19:20

  I was walking down the street in Warrenton, Virginia, it was such a fine sight to see,,,Well, not so much for a linden street tree. It was in fact a fine blue-sky day, but backlit against that sky, the leaves of this linden displayed serious leaf scorch along the outer portions of what should have been deep green leaves. The tree itself was not thriving, annual growth was poor, and the leaves looked as parched as the 95 degree southern day. The culprit? The trunk had a completely flat trunk where it entered the soil. This is suggestive of a stem-girdling root that is restricting...

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Jim Chatfield
Leaves of Three - Just Let it Be! stone.91 Wed, 07/27/2016 - 18:19

 

While people vary in their sensitivity to poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans), repeat exposure to the oily resin called urushiol that is found in all parts of the plant, can sometimes increase a person's sensitivity over time.  

 

Poison ivy is a very prolific plant and can be found almost anywhere.  It is common to see this plant along roadsides, along fence lines, in the woods, at forest edges, and even in the landscape.  A reason for this wide distribution is that fruit is eaten by wildlife like birds and deer.  It is documented that over 60 species of...

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Amy Stone
The Ins and Outs of Bagworms chatfield.1 Wed, 07/27/2016 - 17:49

  The title of this bygl-alert is actually a bit disingenuous, since Dave Shetlar, Joe Boggs, and Curtis Young, entomologists all, are better equipped on the ins and outs of Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis, the common bagworm, compared to me, a plant pathologist. The Latin binomial itself makes me a bit crazy, which I guess makes sense, since the family (group of related genera) for the common bagworm is – Psychidae. The actual ins and outs in this case actually refers to what my wife and I saw at a central Pennsylvania rest area this weekend.  There were numerous...

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Jim Chatfield
Keep a Lookout for Porcelain-Berry crook.46 Wed, 07/27/2016 - 15:15

Porcelain-berry (Ampelopsis brevipedunculata) is a deciduous, woody, perennial vine native to Northeast Asia. The leaves are alternate, simple 2 ½ to 5" long and wide with a heart-shaped base and 3 to 5 palmate lobes.  The inconspicuous flowers are green-white and appear in June through August.  The colorful grape-like fruits mature from September to October changing from pale lilac, to green to a bright blue.  

Porcelain-berry grows and spreads quickly in partial to full sunlight.  This vigorous invader grows well in moist soils and can often be found along ponds, stream banks and...

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Julie Crook
Mighty Mites Fell High Tunnel Tomatoes draper.15 Tue, 07/26/2016 - 20:13
This week I had calls from two high tunnel tomato growers asking what would cause tomato plants to turn yellow and then that affected foliage to dry up completely. Of course that intrigued me and I had to go see what was going on with the tomatoes.
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Erik Draper
Squiggly Lines on Magnolia Leaves boggs.47 Tue, 07/26/2016 - 16:37

The highly visible handiwork of the magnolia serpentine leafmining caterpillar (Phyllocnistis magnoliella) is becoming evident magnolias in nurseries and landscapes in southern Ohio.  The moth belongs to the leafmining family Gracillariidae.  The tiny caterpillars of this aptly named moth feed close to the upper leaf epidermis, producing long, thin, serpentine mines that appear as silvery tracks snaking across the leaf surface.

 

Hosts for this leafminer include bigleaf, cucumber, southern, star, sweet bay, and umbrella magnolias.  Large numbers of mines on a...

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Joe Boggs
Big Friendly Giant Caterpillars boggs.47 Tue, 07/26/2016 - 16:31

Finding giant silkworm caterpillars (family Saturniidae) or observing the resulting giant moths was once a common occurrence.  Notable members of this moth family include Cecropia (Hyalophora Cecropia); Luna (Actias luna); Polyphemus (Antheraea polyphemus); Promethia (Callosamia promethean); and the impressively named Hickory Horned Devil (Citheronia regalis).

 

...

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Joe Boggs
Hidden Hornworms boggs.47 Mon, 07/25/2016 - 21:44
While watering the two tomato plants in my great expectations garden, I noticed a few missing leaves and some black, barrel-shaped frass (insect excrement) beneath the plants. Certain I'd quickly find the hornworm culprits, I looked, and looked, and … I'm always amazed at how well these large caterpillars can remain hidden from our probing eyes!
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Joe Boggs
Cockscomb Galls on Elm boggs.47 Sun, 07/24/2016 - 17:09

Look closely at the leaves of slippery elm (= red elm) (Ulmus rubra); you may be lucky enough to spot the unusual looking elm cockscomb galls produced by the so-called elm cockscomb aphid, Colopha ulmicola.  Although these galls are commonly mentioned in the literature, I've rarely seen them in southwest Ohio where elm sack galls produced by the aphid, Tetraneura ulmi, are the dominant aphid gall found on slippery elm.

 

...

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Joe Boggs
Wasp Pottery boggs.47 Sat, 07/23/2016 - 18:31

I didn't need to travel far today to discover an entomological wonder.  Attached to my porch railing was a tiny, clay pot; the handiwork of a Potter Wasp (Eumenes sp.).   As their common name describes, potter wasps fashion small rounded jug-like nests out of clay, and they attach the nests to leaves, twigs, or to structures such as window seals or in my case, a porch railing.

 

...

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Joe Boggs
Liriodendron Leaf Yellowing chatfield.1 Fri, 07/22/2016 - 15:42

During the hot, dry conditions of summer, numerous trees will shed some of their leaves. A good example is tuliptree (Liriodendron tulipifera). I (think) I remember flying in from the Pacific Northwest in August one dry year and as we got close to landing, was able to pick out the tuliptrees due to their earlier than fall color yellow leaves interspersed on the tree among the more prevalent green.  

Today, I was walking in Wooster in northeast Ohio, and the ground was littered with fallen leaves of tuliptree.  It even seemed like some of them were sweating in the 90+...

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Jim Chatfield
Hot, Dry Conditions Reveal Fairy Rings boggs.47 Fri, 07/22/2016 - 15:09
The National Weather Service (NWS) issued an Excessive Heat Warning today for Greater Cincinnati. This is the highest alert based on the NWS Heat Index. I believe anything higher would cause spontaneous human combustion. I made a quick BYGL Alert! photo trek and found that fairy rings are now being revealed by the current hot/dry conditions in southwest Ohio.
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Joe Boggs
82nd Ohio Plant Diagnostic Workshop chatfield.1 Fri, 07/22/2016 - 10:29

  From Dogwood diseases to doghouse damage, from beetlemania to bot rot, literally from Aster yellows to Zinnia powdery mildew, diagnostic workshops are where it’s at. Please come to Wooster in the late, late summer sun.  Samples galore and clinic catharsis, a few short talks, a diagnostic walkabout at Secrest Arboretum six years after the storm, the Secrest sound system blaring out Townes van Zandt, Johnny Cash, and Leadbelly. Yowser. Registration information is coming soon, but for now highlight with stars and multicolored magic markers, from the Ohio State University Extension...

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Jim Chatfield
Teasel Flower Heads are on the Rise boggs.47 Thu, 07/21/2016 - 13:58

Cutleaf Teasel (Dipsacus laciniatus) and Common Teasel (Dipsacus fullonum) are native to Eurasia and North Africa and were originally introduced into the U.S. in the 1700s for use in the textile industry; the prickly dried seed heads were used to raise the nap on fabrics.  Later introductions were for ornamental use with the persistent dried seed heads still used in flower arrangements. They are now found throughout the U.S. often creating havoc in naturalized areas.

 

...

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Joe Boggs
Curtis E. Young
Flower Longhorn Beetles boggs.47 Thu, 07/21/2016 - 13:47

True to their common name, Flower Longhorn Beetles (family Cerambycidae, subfamily Lepturinae) are found on flowers where they feed on pollen and nectar.  They have a particular affinity for the umbel flowers produced my members of the carrot/parsley/celery family (Apiaceae, formerly Umbelliferae).  I always look closely at Queen Anne's lace which is where I found the bachelor beetle shown at the beginning of this report and the cavorting couple shown below.  Flower longhorn beetles are considered plant pollinators although little is known of the extent of their impact.

 

...

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Joe Boggs
Pine Tube Moth boggs.47 Thu, 07/21/2016 - 13:43

Individual Pine Tube Moth (Argyrotaenia pinatubana) caterpillars use silk to form a hollow tube by binding together 10 - 20 needles.  They then move up and down their silk-lined tube to feed on the tips of the bound needles.  Once they've almost eaten themselves (literally) out of house and home, the caterpillars will move to another set of needles to repeat their tube-making needle-feeding behavior.  The caterpillars eventually pupate within their needle tubes.

 

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Joe Boggs

Dogwood Powdery Mildew: Signs and Symptoms

Like many powdery mildew diseases, high relative humidity but not high rainfall is a key to dogwood powdery mildew, caused by the fungus Erysiphe pulchra. There is a good bit of this disease this year in northeast Ohio, which is quite dry, and yesterday I took a look at some flowering dogwoods (Cornus florida) growing in pots in trials. There was a good bit of fungal mycelial growth and spores en masse evident on the foliage (what is called the “sign” of the pathogen), which is something everyone is familiar with for many powdery mildew diseases. Good examples are lilac...

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Jim Chatfield
Maackia Madness: Two For One chatfield.1 Wed, 07/20/2016 - 13:53

  The 4th Question of Plant Problem Diagnostics (http://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/floriculture/images/20_Questions_on_Plant_Diagnosis.pdf) is “What Do You See?” in terms of symptoms of plant damage. The 6th Question (after “What is the Overall Health?) is a return to the idea of symptoms with “What Exactly Do You See?” I was reminded of this the other day when looking at an Amur maackia tree in my backyard. The tree foliage is mostly above arms-length, but I could see that Japanese beetle flyers had no problem, munching with their chewing mouthparts, leaving sections of leaves partly...

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Jim Chatfield
Alert Reissued: Cicada Killers boggs.47 Wed, 07/20/2016 - 09:39

I posted a BYGL Alert on July 20 regarding Cicada Killer Wasps (Sphecius speciosus) cruising lawns and landscapes in southwest Ohio.  However, since that time, I've been slammed with reports and questions concerning these "giant wasps."  So, I'm reissuing my cicada killer report; it appears there are some very heavy localized populations.

 

These large wasps are the nemesis of Dog-Day Cicadas (Tibicen spp.), so it is no coincidence that they appear on the scene when dog-day cicadas emerge.  Cicada killers are the largest wasps found in Ohio, measuring 1 1/...

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Joe Boggs
I Speak for the Milkweed Tussock Moth! boggs.47 Tue, 07/19/2016 - 18:45

I came across early instar milkweed tussock moth caterpillars (Euchaetes egle) feeding on their namesake host yesterday and they reminded me of an e-mail message I received last year.  The message was from a well-meaning monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) enthusiast who asked how they could control tussock caterpillars so they wouldn't compete with monarchs.  I was aghast.  We celebrate the rejection of a monarchy each July 4! 

 

It can't be denied that milkweed tussock moth...

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Joe Boggs
Hen and Chicks ... Blooming? draper.15 Tue, 07/19/2016 - 16:16

Last week, as I was walking into the office one morning, I suddenly noticed what appeared to be a strange swelling coming up out of the center of one of the succulents, commonly called “hen and chicks” (Sempervivium spp.)  I decided to keep an eye on it as I passed daily since the plants were clustered at the sidewalk by the entrance. 

After a couple of days, it began to appear to me that it was going to be a stalk of some kind.  In rapt amazement, I watched as I saw flower buds form on that stalk, which was about 6” tall.  In all of my plant gawking years, I have never...

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Erik Draper
Birdsfoot Trefoil Foiling Landscapes and Naturalized Areas boggs.47 Mon, 07/18/2016 - 20:38

Traveling through southwest Ohio this weekend, I noticed ever-expanding patches of birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) along roadways, in landscapes, and in home and commercial lawns.  Yet another story of dueling plant cultivation interests.  This perennial, spreading, herbaceous legume is native to Europe and Asia.  It was introduced into North America for use as a forage crop harvested for hay or used in pastures.  Plants can survive and thrive in a wide range of soil and environmental conditions that would limit the use of other forage crops such as alfalfa.  Indeed, you...

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Joe Boggs
Strafing Horse Flies boggs.47 Mon, 07/18/2016 - 20:34

While taking photos today of willow pinecone galls for a BYGL Alert, I was constantly strafed by a maniacal horse fly (Tananus spp.).  These hefty flies belong to the family Tabanidae which is the largest family of bloodsucking insects with over 4,500 horsefly species known worldwide.  There are several species in Ohio ranging in size from 3/8 - 1 1/8" in length.  The crazed fly buzzing me was T. abdominalis.  It doesn't have a common name other than #@%%# fly!  At least, that's what I called it.

 

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Joe Boggs
Weird Willow Gall boggs.47 Mon, 07/18/2016 - 20:30

Arguably, one of the weirdest galls found in Ohio is produced on willow by the gall-midge, Rhabdophaga strobiloides (family Cecidomyiidae).  The gall's appearance isn't weird; it looks like a pine cone.  However, finding a "pine cone" on a willow is weird.  As the common name implies, the Willow Pinecone Gall, which is sometimes called the "pine cone willow gall," closely resembles a pine cone with closed seed scales.

 

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Joe Boggs
Foliage Foretells (F)all chatfield.1 Mon, 07/18/2016 - 15:13

  This spring I wrote of sour gum/black gum/tupelo/pepperidge (Nyssa sylvatica) when I noticed for the first time that I had a male tree (with stamens) and a female tree (with pistils) in my back field. Until then I thought of them as just two tupelos. Well, the bird-beloved result of their union have now resulted in greenish fruits which soon will be blue-purple. So, flowers, fruits, now a word about  – foliage. Tupelo leaves are wonderfully lustrous green in spring and summer before turning intense scarlets, oranges, and purples in fall. But, wait, the time has come, as every...

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Jim Chatfield
Cultivate Hydrangeas chatfield.1 Sun, 07/17/2016 - 21:48

  Hydrangea is a genus of great range and beauty. Panicle types such as PeeGee hydrangea. Mopheads. Climbing hydrangeas. Oakleaf hydrangeas of beautiful panicle flowers and wonderful fall foliage. Delicate pinks and blues, sometimes on the same plant. Electric colors to make a big splash. Hydrangeas were on display, revealing a high level of horticultural expertise at AmericanHort’s Cultivate’16 this past week as well as in the horticulturally laissez-faire world of the ChatScape, where my daughter Sara took a picture of the creams and pinks of an oakleaf hydrangea panicle today...

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Jim Chatfield
Japanese Beetle Centennial chatfield.1 Sun, 07/17/2016 - 16:45

  Japanese beetles on a linden leaf or on a rose leaf or flower - to this we are accustomed. On certain plants though, such as cut-leaf rhamnus or as shown here from Wooster, Ohio on dawnredwood (Metasequoia glyptostroboides); somehow it seems like they do not have enough of a perch or dining area.  Perhaps it is the small-plates phenomenon. At any rate, the chewing-mouthparts damage here is quite familiar and Popillia japonica damage to the turf and ornamental industry is huge. In fact, a 2002 paper by Dan Potter and David Held of the University of Kentucky (Annu. Rev....

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Jim Chatfield
Petunias, Part Deux chatfield.1 Sun, 07/17/2016 - 11:13

Two weeks ago, I wrote a paean to petunias and how they liven up the street scene in Wooster Ohio. This week, I got a second dose while traversing the trade show floor at Cultivate’16, the summer festival of flowers and floricultural and all horticultural education put on by American Hort at the Columbus Convention Center.  There were of course many more attractions as well as petunias. Yet, this among many, all my life I have waited for flowers such as these. Below are just a few to whet your petunia palette with what is here now and with what is to come of new varieties.  Get thee to...

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Jim Chatfield
Queendom of the Spiders boggs.47 Sat, 07/16/2016 - 09:41

The 1977 sci-fi movie, Kingdom of the Spiders, that stared William Shatner got it wrong.  Not with tapping Captain Kirk for the lead role, but with the movie's title:  with rare exceptions, only female spiders spin species-typical webs.  It's still a pretty good movie even with the 1970s era special effects.

 

Of course, the downside with such arachnophobic movies is what happens when movie viewers venture forth in the morning.  Ohioans may be surprised at the large number of spiders living near at hand when heavy morning dews accentuate their gossamer creations. ...

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Joe Boggs
Cypress Twig Galls Adorn Baldcypress boggs.47 Sat, 07/16/2016 - 09:07
I came across the galling handiwork of the cypress twig gall midge fly (Taxodiomyia cupressiananassa) on baldcypress while on a photo-trek in southwest Ohio on Thursday.  These spongy, white galls were something of an oddity when I started with Extension 25 years ago.  However, for some reason that has changed with these galls becoming a common adornment on baldcypress.
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Joe Boggs
Walnut Caterpillars on the Prowl boggs.47 Fri, 07/15/2016 - 16:14

Walnut caterpillars (Datana integerrima) are native insects meaning that year-to-year population densities are usually kept in check by predators, parasitoids, and pathogens (the 3-Ps).  However, we occasionally see "outbreak years" when caterpillar numbers surge ahead of the combined natural suppression provided by the 3-Ps.  I'm not suggesting we are experiencing an outbreak season, but walnut caterpillars are certainly not hard to find!  In fact, I've come across the characteristic patchy defoliation produced by colonies of these caterpillars on their namesake host in two...

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Joe Boggs
Elongate Hemlock Scale boggs.47 Fri, 07/15/2016 - 16:07

The non-native Elongate Hemlock Scale (Fiorinia externa), which is sometimes called "Fiornia scale," occurs on the underside of needles and on cones.  It may infest its namesake host as well as on other conifers including firs, Douglas-fir, spruces, cedars, pines, and yews.  The scale was accidently introduced to the U.S. from Japan and was first found in New York, NY, in 1908.  Currently, it's found in much of the native range for eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) and Carolina hemlock (T. caroliniana).  Where it overlaps with the non-native Hemlock Woolly...

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Joe Boggs
Yellowpoplar Weevil Damage on Magnolia chatfield.1 Wed, 07/13/2016 - 21:20

Yellowpoplar weevil adults  (Odontopus calceatus) causes feeding damage on tuliptree (yellow-poplar, tulip-poplar, tuliptree), magnolia and sassafras, resulting in holes in leaves, aptly described as resembling “curved rice grains” by many fact sheets, including an excellent one by the University of Kentucky. After adults mate in late spring, eggs hatch and larvae “mine” areas of the leaves, resulting in a scorched appearance of the new growth of the tree or shrub (certain magnolias). Although this damage is not considered important to plant health, it may significantly affect the...

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Jim Chatfield
Bloodsucking Conenose Found: Don't Panic! boggs.47 Wed, 07/13/2016 - 18:20

I met Cindy Meyer at her OSU Extension, Butler County, office yesterday to take pictures of a bloodsucking conenose (Triatoma sanguisuga) that had been collected by a concerned homeowner.  This is the second time I've taken pictures of this "kissing bug" species in Ohio.  The first time was in 2010 when I found a specimen crawling on the outside of my home in Butler County.  According to a paper published in the Ohio Journal of Science in 1960 titled, "Arthropods of Medical Importance in Ohio," the bloodsucking conenose is found in southern Ohio.  So, finding the...

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Joe Boggs
Cindy Meyer
Diagnostic Walk-About Highlight: Mystery Solved boggs.47 Wed, 07/13/2016 - 18:10

A mystery that has bedeviled me for several years was finally solved this past Monday thanks to participants in the Southwest Ohio BYGLive! Diagnostic Walk-About and my Walk-About partner, Julie Crook.  As I reported in my July 1, 2016, BYGL Alert! (Coneflower Calamities:  Round 1), Sunflower Head-Clipping Weevil (Haplorhynchites aeneus) females clip the flowers of coneflowers as well as members of the Silphium genus.  Indeed, the weevil is sometimes called the "Silphium weevil" owing to its strong association with plants in this genus.

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Joe Boggs
Dueling Insects on Oak Leaf chatfield.1 Wed, 07/13/2016 - 13:46

One of the challenges of plant problem diagnostics is that Nature is sometimes less tidy than we might wish. Pests do not confine their damage to plants one at a time, and also the different stages of an insect may cause different types of damage (symptoms).  Oak shothole leafminer (Agromyza viridula) adult flies damage oak leaf buds with their ovipositors. The holes from this damage expand as the leaf expands, causing the characteristically parallel holes on either side of the unfolding leaf.  Later larvae of this insect cause leaf-mining damage shown as browned areas in the...

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Jim Chatfield
Joe Boggs
The Table is Set and the Birds are Feasting! titchenell.4 Wed, 07/13/2016 - 12:19

While spending some time earlier this week at Sharon Woods Metro Park, one of the Columbus and Franklin County's Metro Parks, I had the opportunity to capture some shots of a downy woodpecker flittering about in an small alder tree. I was playing around with a new camera and was 'zoomed' in rather far when as I took the pictures. It wasn't until I returned to the office that I realized the downy woodpecker was doing much more than 'flittering about". It was actually feasting on woolly alder aphids!

 

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Marne Titchenell
Got Bats in the Belfry? Here's What to Do! titchenell.4 Wed, 07/13/2016 - 11:42

March through September is the active time for bats in Ohio.  Ohio’s 11 species spend their summer hours like every other species in Ohio – feeding and reproducing.  There is no question Ohioans benefit from the feeding of bats – a single bat can consume over 1000 mosquito-sized insects in one night. 

The reproduction side of things however, can sometimes cause an issue…especially if the result is a colony of bats in the home.  Two Ohio bat species will commonly share living space with humans; the little brown bat and the big brown bat.  The females of both of these species form...

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Marne Titchenell
Turkey Tales chatfield.1 Tue, 07/12/2016 - 21:35

My wife and I live in the country in Wayne County in northeast Ohio, and enjoy the sights and sounds of wild-life.  Coyotes provide their weird series of moans, whistles, yips, and howls – truly cool.  Equally cool we have a turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) hen and two poults that waltz through our yard periodically this summer. This is much to our delight, except for areas of the lawn (such as it is with our dry period this summer) that they ruffle up, presumably in their omnivorous belief that “We Have The Meat” (insects and millipedes) and vegetables (acorns, roots, almost...

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Jim Chatfield
Annual Dog-Day Cicada Emergence boggs.47 Mon, 07/11/2016 - 19:11

Annual dog-day cicadas (Tibicen spp.; family Cicadidae) are emerging in southwest Ohio.  Like periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.; family Cicadidae), these cicadas also develop underground with the nymphs sucking juices from tree roots.  However, periodical cicadas require 13 or 17 years to complete their development with adults emerging en masse in the spring, usually beginning around mid-to-late May and ending in June.  Indeed, eastern Ohio, parts of West Virginia, and the extreme southwest part of Pennsylvania experienced the emergence of Brood V 17-year periodical...

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Joe Boggs
Annual Flaming of Black Locust Trees boggs.47 Mon, 07/11/2016 - 19:04

This past Friday, I observed heavy damage on black locust caused by the locust leafminer beetle (Odontota dorsalis) along State Rt. 50 in Ross and Vinton Counties.  The captivating reddish-brown leaf coloration caused by this beetle is often a familiar sight to travelers motoring on Ohio's interstate highways.  Indeed, black locust may be identified at highway speeds because they are the "flamed" trees in the tree lines bordering the highway.

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Joe Boggs
Buzz-Bombing Beetles boggs.47 Mon, 07/11/2016 - 18:55

I received a report over the weekend of Green June Beetles (Cotinus nitida) (GJB) buzzing a wedding in a park in southwest Ohio.  These large, metallic green beetles tend to emerge en masse.  Their large size, coupled with an audible "buzzing" sound, and low level flight plan (cruising at about 2-3'), may induce panic with individuals unfamiliar with this insect.  Indeed, there have been reports of GJB causing picnickers to flee feasts, pool loungers to lunge, and golfers to fail to stay the course.  The beetles have great entertainment value!

 

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Joe Boggs
Periodical Cicada "Flagging:" Leaves at Tips of Branches are Turning Brown boggs.47 Sat, 07/09/2016 - 13:51

Round 1 of the Periodical Cicada:

The emergence of Brood V of the 17-year periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) lived up to all expectations within the "cicada zone" in eastern Ohio, parts of West Virginia, and a very small part of southwest Pennsylvania.  Adults emerged in huge numbers, they climbed trees or flew to new trees, males serenaded cicada females with cacophonous songs only appreciated by the females, and mated females inserted eggs into stems.  The cicada adults are now dead and gone.

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Joe Boggs

Holy Heck Batman! What Happened to My Asters!!!!

I haven't been in my perennial garden for a few days so when I went in last night to do some weeding, I was shocked by the damage to my asters caused by the chrysanthemum lacebug.  Holy heck is a toned-down version of what I really said.  These lacebugs had totally obliterated the three plants (two different cultivars) in my beds.  My only option at this time is to cut them to the ground and hope we get enough rain to push new growth so that they bloom this year sometime before Christmas!  

 

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Pam Bennett

Are You Checking Your Arborvitaes (and other Evergreens) for Bagworms?

Have you looked closely at your arborvitaes and other bagworm-susceptible evergreens such as Juniper?  Bagworms are a little easier to see now as the needle clad "bags" are beginning to turn brown.  These caterpillars can creep up on you and strip a plant before you know it so keep your eyes out and regularly inspect.  I have been watching a nearby arborvitae and noticed that the bags on this particular plant in Clark County are anywhere from 1/4" to 1" in size.  As they get bigger, they are much easier to spot.  When bagworms first hatch, it's even a challenge to the untrained eye to find...

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Pam Bennett
Poison Hemlock Going to Seed boggs.47 Thu, 07/07/2016 - 14:13

Poison hemlock (Conium maculatum) is among the most deadly plants in North America.  This non-native invasive weed contains highly toxic piperidine alkaloid compounds, including coniine and gamma-coniceine, which cause respiratory failure and death when ingested by mammals.

 

TOXICITY:

Poison hemlock is native to North Africa and Eurasia including Greece.  It's the plant behind Socrates' famous last words, "I drank what?"  Or, maybe it was, "don't try this at home."  Just kidding.  In fact, it was the plant used to poison...

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Joe Boggs
Ash Leaf Spot boggs.47 Thu, 07/07/2016 - 14:08

There is no doubt that treatments with systemic insecticides can protect ash trees from the ravages of emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) (EAB).  However, insecticide treatments against EAB will not produce super ash trees.  Treated trees are still susceptible to a range of pest and disease problems that were observed on ash trees long before EAB arrived on the scene.  This includes fungal leaf spots.

 

Fungal leaf spots on ash may be caused by two different fungi:  Mycosphaerella effigurata and M. fraxinicola.  The diseases associated with...

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Joe Boggs
Guignardia Leaf Blotch Red Alert boggs.47 Thu, 07/07/2016 - 14:04

Guignardia leaf blotch of Aescelus produced by the fungus, Guignardia aesculi, is becoming evident on buckeyes and horsechestnuts in many areas of Ohio.  The fungal spores require moisture to spread to new growth in the spring and to germinate to initiate foliar infections.  Infections and resulting symptoms then progress rapidly during warm summer months.

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Joe Boggs
Grasshoppers Abound boggs.47 Thu, 07/07/2016 - 13:59

During our BYGL Inservice call this past Tuesday; Pam Bennett (Clark County) and Amy Stone (Lucas County) reported observing high grasshopper populations in southwest and northwest Ohio, respectively.  This is the time of year when most grasshoppers are still nymphs which may make identification a challenge.  However, the four most common grasshopper species found in Ohio landscapes include the Differential Grasshopper (Melanoplus differentialis), Red-Legged Grasshopper (M. femurrubrum), Green-Legged Grasshopper (M. viridipes), and the Carolina Locust (Dissosteira...

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Joe Boggs

Assassin Bug Nymphs

Insects belonging to the Hemipteran family Reduviidae are collectively known as assassin bugs.  The family includes over 160 species in North America and all are meat eaters.  The common name for the family clearly describes how these stealthy hunters make a living.  The bugs are equipped with piercing-sucking mouthparts that are used to inject paralyzing and pre-digestive enzymes into their prey.  They then suck the essence-of-insect from their hapless victims.

 

Assassin bugs pass through three developmental stages:  eggs, nymphs, and adults.  This is known as "incomplete...

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Joe Boggs

Japanese Beetles Making a Comeback

I have received numerous reports and pictures from southern and central Ohio of heavy localized Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica) populations.  Infestations are not widespread; however, where they are occurring beetles are being found in high numbers feeding on a wide range of hosts from favorite foods such wild grape, linden trees, and roses to some unusual hosts such as oak.  Dan Potter (Department of Entomology, University of Kentucky) has also reported high populations in Lexington, KY.

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Joe Boggs

Bagworms on Deciduous Trees

Common bagworm (Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis) populations crashed a few years ago in Ohio with this general defoliator becoming a rare find.  This changed last season with significant localized populations observed in many areas of the state and the trend appears to be continuing this season.  I've recently found several heavy infestations in southern Ohio with significant damage now becoming very evident.

 

It is a common misconception that bagworms only eat evergreens; however, the caterpillars can feed on over 130 different species of plants including a wide...

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Joe Boggs

I Love Rust: Sometimes

Rust diseases of plants may of course be devastating, from black stem rust of wheat which contributed to famine after World War I to cedar apple rusts which must be controlled by orchardists and (sometimes) landscapers today. Yet, it must be admitted, they are fascinating. They can be autoecious (occurring on only one host plant) such as may-apple rust commonly seen in spring woodlands, but often they must complete their life cycles on wildly different hosts, such as wheat & barberry, juniper & apple.

 

About a month ago I came upon a rust disease I had not...

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Jim Chatfield

Imported Willow Leaf Beetle: Look for 2nd Generation Larvae

Second generation larvae of the imported willow leaf beetles (Plagiodera versicolora) are munching the leaves of wild and cultivated willows in southwest Ohio.  This native of northern Europe was first found in the U.S. in 1915.  Since that time, it has become well established throughout most of the eastern and Midwestern states.  This beetle has a history of periodically achieving population outbreak densities and causing significant defoliation of its namesake host in Ohio.

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Joe Boggs

O Rose Thou Art Sick!

With apologies to William Blake and his 1794 publication of the deep-meaning “The Sick Rose” poem, it occurred to me that I was indeed deliberately trying to weaken the pictured rose (multiflora) by mowing in my back lot and continually chopping off the terminal shoot of this rose. In my case, I see this mowing as a metaphor for typically improper topping that I will negatively highlight in my pruning talk at the Cultivate 2016 program a week hence. For trees, top not, you clod-loppers: it releases adjacent buds resulting in hormonal imbalance and tufted, weak growth.

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Jim Chatfield

Name This Tree

Probably a decade ago, I brought home a containerized tree, probably from a Secrest Arboretum Plant Discovery Day sale, perhaps as a gift from a friend. It was neglected in its container at the side of our house in northeast Ohio until my wife elbowed me into planting it on a day with little time and I stuck it a few feet away near some old spruce trees. I mostly forgot about it, maybe once a year wondering if this was a volunteer that had sprouted up or if I had planted it, until last year, at about 15 feet tall (yes, I am that unobservant and lazy), when I noticed this tree’s yellow...

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Jim Chatfield
Wanted: Butterfly Weed chatfield.1 Sun, 07/03/2016 - 18:11

This native 1- to 3-foot herbaceous perennial, Asclepias tuberosa (not to be confused with butterfly bush, Buddleia) provides that fairly uncommon sight along roadsides, in meadows and, increasingly in gardens – a bright orange flower. This caught my eye so dramatically decades ago that I had to pull over while driving an interstate highway in Iowa, against the increasingly urgent verbotens of the Herr Professor in the passenger seat. Just had to take a look.

 

It is sometimes called orange milkweed, and Asclepias is a genus with many species that...

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Jim Chatfield

The Beringian Land Bridge and the Sumac Gall Aphid

The bladder-like galls produced the Sumac Gall Aphid (Melaphis rhois) are just beginning to develop on the leaflet midveins of its namesake host in southwest Ohio.  The galls are currently light green and so small they may be difficult to detect.  However, as the season progresses, the galls will eventually become more evident growing to 1/2 - 1" in length and becoming variegated with areas that are greenish-white bounded by areas that are mottled reddish-pink.

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Joe Boggs

Grape Phylloxera

Every time I see the bristly, lumpy round galls produced by the grape phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae) on the lower leaf surfaces of wild grape (Vitis spp.), I'm reminded of the story of how an American saved the French (and European) wine industry.  Some may consider it a return on the favor for the French making it possible for us to have something to celebrate on the 4th of July.

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Joe Boggs

Chicory is in Bloom

Chicory is a weed that is in bloom in Ohio right now. It can be seen growing abundantly beside roads and highways. It can also be found in lawns, pastures, fields, and waste places. Originating in the Mediterranean chicory was distributed throughout much of the world where it was grown for centuries as a salad green. It escaped from cultivation in North America and has naturalized and spread throughout southern Canada and the U.S.

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Julie Crook

Regal Katsuratrees

Katsuratree (Cercidiphyllum japonicum) is one of my favorite trees, providing an array of foliar colors throughout the season and a sometimes elusive, but wondrous aroma of crème brulee on fallen Autumn leaves. I could go on and on, but it is better to hear from the master.

Michael Dirr in his “Manual of Woody Landscape Plants” writes of katsuratree: “New leaves emerge a beautiful reddish purple and gradually change to bluish green in summer; fall color varies from yellow to apricot...leaf is shaped like a redbud (Cercis) leaf...the senescing (fall-coloring)...

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Jim Chatfield

Coneflower Calamities: Round 3

Stunted and deformed coneflower plants are symptoms of Aster Yellows.  Of the three coneflower problems I'm presenting in this series, Aster Yellows is the most serious and its control requires the most extreme measures.  This is a serious, chronic disease that occurs throughout North America and may affect over 300 species of plants in 38 families including a number of vegetables such as carrots and potatoes.  However, as its common name implies, the disease most occurs on members of the aster family (Asteraceae (= Compositae); coneflowers appear to be particularly susceptible.

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Joe Boggs

Coneflower Calamities: Round 2

Tufted flower parts that rise rosette-like from coneflower cones are produced by the Coneflower Rosette Mite.   The mite is an eriophyid (family Eriophyidae) that has yet to be taxonomically categorized, so it has no scientific name or approved common name.  However, the mite is generally referred to as the Coneflower Rosette Mite based on the damage that it causes to coneflowers.

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Joe Boggs

Coneflower Calamities: Round 1

I share Pam Bennett's love for coneflowers; she highlighted the delightful range of cultivars in her BYGL Alert! posted on June 30.  Of course, as she also noted, mass plantings of this wonderful native may suffer from occasional problems.  I'm covering three of the more serious coneflower challenges that may threaten coneflowers in Ohio landscapes in a 3-part series under the banner, "Coneflower Calamities."  Fortunately, each of these problems can be effectively managed through accurate early identification and focused management options.

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Joe Boggs

Many Diagnostic Choices for Tomato Wilt

This was one of many tomato questions submitted to Ask an Expert and Ask a Master Gardener, OSU Extension's on-line service providing Ohioans answers to horticulture questions and other topics.  This started a discussion on how providing a definitive answer is not always possible. Even when more details are provided, one diagnostic solution is not always the answer; there can be several things all happening at the same time.  In this particular case, we reviewed the many possible causes for tomato wilt.  These include:

 

  • lack of water,
  • tomato spotted wilt...
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Denise Johnson

Petunias!

I walked through downtown Wooster, Ohio earlier today and was reminded once more of our debt to petunia breeders and petuniacal horticulturists of the past decade or two. Wow, planters and hanging baskets of incredible colors, shapes and sustained beauty throughout the summer. It’s bloomin’ crazy! The genus Petunia and its cousin the “mini-petunia” genus Calibrachoa rule. Both genera are native to South America and are in the Solanaceae (the nightshade family) with tell-tale funnel-like flowers: Some taxonomists even classify the two genera in the genus Petchoa...

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Jim Chatfield

Coneflowers Starting to Hit Peak Bloom

I love coneflowers and never seem to tire of all of the different cultivars on the market.  In central Ohio Echinacea cultivars are beginning to hit their peak bloom period and will continue to show off until late summer.  Some of the pests to watch for this season include Japanese beetles (of course) as well as one relatively new pest that has been wreaking havoc on coneflowers, the SUNFLOWER HEAD-CLIPPING WEEVIL.  This pest usually shows up in July, damaging the flower stems, just below...

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Pam Bennett

Cucumber Beetles Causing Damage

While inspecting my garden the other day, I discovered that my cucumber leaves had some tiny holes in them.  Upon further inspection I discovered a few striped cucumber beetles.  Populations seem to be moderate on my plants at this time in the Clark County area, but I am not taking any chances.  

 

Both striped and spotted cucumber beetles can cause serious damage on plants such as cucumbers and melons.  In addition, I have seen considerable damage to perennial flowers when beetle populations are high.   I tend to have more trouble with the stripped beetle as opposed to the...

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Pam Bennett
Squirrels Debarking Trees boggs.47 Thu, 06/30/2016 - 11:18

Earlier this week, Dr. Mike Klahr (Extension Agent, Horticulture, Boone County Cooperative Extension) shared photographs sent to him by a homeowner of bark stripping damage caused by squirrels on a honeylocust in a landscape in Boone County, KY.  Thanks to Mike, he and I were able to visit the site yesterday so I could take photos to illustrate this report.  We found that all of the debarking damage seemed to be focused on a single tree; we could not find damage on other trees on the property as well as on trees in neighboring properties including on a large oak that had a squirrel leaf-...

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Joe Boggs
Cicadas and Conifers chatfield.1 Thu, 06/30/2016 - 09:23

Last week, driving along I-71 in northeast Ohio with an entomologist friend Dan Herms, we noticed small areas of browning on trees, including honeylocusts, that we passed while I was driving the legal speed limit. Unthinkingly, on the fly, I mentioned that it looked like mimosa webworm damage was showing up. Politely, Dan pointed out that that the many species of trees, from oaks to honeylocusts, from hickories to maples and many more, were exhibiting flagging from – cicada damage. Duhh, having seen and heard cicadas in this Medina/Lorain County area, I should have known. Damage on these...

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Jim Chatfield
Red Milkweed Beetles boggs.47 Mon, 06/27/2016 - 19:08
Brightly colored Red Milkweed Beetles (Tetraopes tetrophthalmus) are easy to find as they mate and feast on milkweed in southern Ohio. These orangish-red, tubular-shaped 3/8 - 1/2" long beetles sport an odd feature that is clearly described by their scientific name.
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Joe Boggs
Beautiful Beetles on Dogbane boggs.47 Mon, 06/27/2016 - 19:02

Earlier today, I came across one of the most beautiful beetles found in Ohio.  The beetle lacks a common name, but is generally referred to as the "Dogbane Beetle" because it primarily feeds on dogbane.  The beetle's scientific name is Chrysochus auratus, which loosely translates to "made of gold."  Indeed, these beautiful iridescent beetles may look like gleaming spots of gold on the leaves of dogbane, or they may blaze with an array of other shimmering colors depending on your angle to the beetle.  A slight change in viewing angle will cause the beetles to glisten with multiple...

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Joe Boggs
Suction-Cups on the Bottom of Oak Leaves boggs.47 Mon, 06/27/2016 - 18:53

I'm always amazed at how the population densities of certain gall-making wasps on oak seem to synchronize over wide geographical areas so that large numbers of the same gall appears over a wide region.  I don't know how they do it.  These are very tiny insects and they have an intimate relationship with their host trees; it's best for them not to stray too far. 

 

Oak button galls on white oak are very common this season throughout southwest Ohio; I even spotted some on oaks in central Indiana.  The galls are produced by the gall wasp, Neuroterus umbilicatus (...

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Joe Boggs
Myrmecophiles on Display boggs.47 Mon, 06/27/2016 - 18:16
The term "myrmecophile" means "ant lover." It's derived from the Greek "myrmex" = ant, and "phlos" = loving. Myremecophile refers to aphids that have a special relationship with ants.
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Joe Boggs
Quercus Quest chatfield.1 Mon, 06/27/2016 - 13:38

A great value added travel joy to the nature and nurture plants-persons within us is trying to figure out the identity of unfamiliar plants. At a Vermont rest area this weekend there were some beautiful oaks (Quercus spp.) with long, maybe 10” long, leaves.  They were in the white oak group, which is a group of oaks with rounded leaf lobes and acorns that develop in one year. Oaks in this group do tend to hybridize readily with each other, but not hybridize with the red/black oak group that have bristle hairs on the tips of the leaf lobes, and which take two years to develop...

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Jim Chatfield
Kathy Smith
Marsonnina Leaf Spot Diagnostics chatfield.1 Sun, 06/26/2016 - 19:10

Marsonnina leaf spot of aspen is something I used to see out West when I lived and worked in Colorado, and maybe once or twice in Ohio, but the example I saw yesterday in Vermont was more about diagnostics. As you can see from this image the Marsonnina fungus causes considerable leaf blotch damage on aspen leaves. Note the pattern however.  The fungus overwinters on twigs and buds and then infects leaves during cool, wet conditions at first leaf emergence. Typically, and as seen here, damage is less or non-existent on subsequent leaf emergence. This pattern is common with many (...

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Jim Chatfield
Ailanthus Webworm Moths boggs.47 Sat, 06/25/2016 - 13:35

Ailanthus webworm moths (Atteva aurea) are flying to porch lights in southwest Ohio.  In my opinion, this is one of the most beautiful moths found in Ohio both because of their coloration and because of what their caterpillars eat.  Caterpillars of this ermine moth (Family Yponomeutidae) feed exclusively on the non-native, highly invasive Tree of Heaven (Ailanthus altissima).

...
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Joe Boggs
Sneaky Caterpillars boggs.47 Sat, 06/25/2016 - 13:30

There are over 1,400 species of moths in North America that belong to the family Geometridae; it's one of our largest families of moths and butterflies.  Yet, their caterpillars often remain undetected until missing parts of leaves draws attention to these sneaky general defoliators.  Look closely at the above image:  can you see the caterpillar?

 

I took this picture after first seeing the leaf damage then finding the caterpillar; however, I almost completely overlooked the culprit.  That's the M.O. of these caterpillars.  Their camouflaged coloration and sneaky behavior...

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Joe Boggs

Japanese Beetles are on the Wing

This past Thursday, I posted that Northern and Southern Masked Chafers (Cyclocephala borealis and C. lurida) were appearing around my porch lights at night in southwest Ohio.  I noted that owing to consistently low Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica) populations in recent years, the two masked chafers have largely supplanted Japanese beetles as the dominant "white grub producing" beetles in my part of the state.  However, that may change this season.

...
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Joe Boggs

Crabapple Scab in Ohio

Apple scab disease, caused by the fungus Venturia inaequalis, is a common problem resulting in major aesthetic damage to many crabapple types (taxa). However, there is a tremendous range of susceptibility of these crabapple taxa to scab, and this can make all the difference to a landscape designer, a nurseryman, a homeowner, a garden center professional or Master Gardener volunteer making recommendations for plant selection. Got leaves, got ugly leaves, got beautiful leaves – all are options.

 

This is why the International Ornamental Crabapple Society has...

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Jim Chatfield
Erik Draper
Curtis E. Young

Crazy Caterpillars Consuming Crabapples!

As Jim Chatfield and I wandered through the “Crablandia” plot evaluating and photographing crabapples today, we noticed multiple stages of the fall webworm munching on some of the foliage of the trees.  We first noticed the initial stages of the fall webworm caterpillars, which were small enough to have congregated on a single leaf.

...
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Erik Draper
Jim Chatfield

Light, Camera - Crabapple!

It is always a revelation when taking pictures, when evaluating plants from catalogue photos, or just in terms of enjoying the nuances of a plant – to realize the importance of light. Backlit photos, the upper and lower surfaces of leaves, outlining against the bright blue sky: come forth and see the light!  Seen here are three views of the same tree, ‘Royal Raindrops’ crabapple.

 

...
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Jim Chatfield
Erik Draper

Apple Scab, Rust and Frog-eye Leaf Spot- Which is What?

As Jim Chatfield and I were out in the “Crablandia” plot today, we noticed the onset of multiple foliar diseases.  Many tree lovers at this time of year start to panic as some of the crabapple leaves begin to turn yellow and drop.  They are often frustrated because they were told that the crabapple they chose was scab resistant, but it still gets spots, the leaves turn yellow and then they fall off.  That’s the Apple Scab fungus right… Well, maybe so and maybe not!

All of these fungal diseases cause spots as a result of their infections of leaf tissue and all of them result in the...

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Erik Draper
Jim Chatfield

Fireblight, Crabapple, Crablandia. One Strike...

We were out in our Crablandia plots at the Secrest Arboretum of OSU’s Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster today. One mission was to check for bacterial fireblight disease on the 76 crabapple taxa in our replicated, randomized plot. This spring we had heard of and seen some fireblight, on crabapples and other related rosaceous plants such as pears elsewhere, and we have susceptible crabapples in the trials so why not here? Yet, cultivar after cultivar, early blooming and late blooming types - no fireblight. Wait, wait, we see one shoot with the tell-tale shepherd’s...

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Jim Chatfield
Erik Draper

Cicada Damage Appearing in NE Ohio

Reports of branch die back in many trees are coming into the Medina Extension Office from around the county.  These brown patches are most likely the result of periodical cicadas laying eggs in the tender branches of trees.  Cicadas prefer laying their eggs in young twigs about 1/4 to 1/2 inch in diameter.  To lay their eggs, cicada stab a needle-like ovipositor into the branch that can cause these tender twigs to break, wither, and die.  The resulting symptom is browning leaves at branch tips known as "flags" or "flagging".  While larger trees have enough foliage to withstand tip dieback...

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Ashley Kulhanek

Fertilizer Injury on Dogwood

This digital image of dogwood arrived with the e-mailer asking if the problem was leaf scorch.   Damage seemed too great and too complete to be simple leaf scorch due to some transient heat stress. Further information indicated that someone had suggested that the plant needed potash and the e-mailer applied it and then asked if too much could be applied.  Well, yes. As with anything, even something as useful as fertilizer, “the dose makes the poison.”

 

The sender had applied 2 pounds of a 6 pound bag of a consumer-product potash (0-0-60) fertilizer. So at 2 pounds...

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Jim Chatfield

Cottony Maple Scale in Northwest Ohio

Earlier this week, Eric Richer (OSU Extension, Fulton County) sent me an image of a maple with almost all of the branches covered with Cottony Maple Scale females that were extruding their elongated, white, cottony ovisacs.  The oval-shaped dark brown females remained highly visible with their ovisacs peeking out from beneath their bodies.  The ovisacs expand to look like 1/4" diameter cotton balls on the branches of their host plants.  The scale has a very wide host range which includes their namesake host as well as ash, basswood/linden, black locust, dogwood, elm, euonymus, hackberry,...

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Joe Boggs
The Great Grub Switcheroo boggs.47 Thu, 06/23/2016 - 22:13

Northern Masked Chafer (Cyclocephala borealis) and Southern Masked Chafer (C. lurida) adults are appearing around porchlights at night in southern Ohio.  It is common for people to assume that white grubs found beneath turfgrass in Ohio are Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica) grubs.  This is no longer a safe bet.  Japanese beetles have largely been replaced by these two chafers as the dominant "white grub producing" beetles in many areas of Ohio including the southern part of the state.  Indeed, I asked an experienced lawn care company last season to collect...

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Joe Boggs
Oak Lace Bug Stippling Damage Whitens White Oak Leaves boggs.47 Thu, 06/23/2016 - 22:06

I received several images of white oak leaves from a homeowner who wanted to know why the leaves appeared bleached.  The culprit was Oak Lace Bug (Corythucha arcuata).  This lace bug lives on the undersides of oak leaves where they use their piercing/sucking mouth parts to suck juices from the leaves.  As with all lace bugs, their feeding produces tiny yellow or whitish leaf spots (stippling) that may coalesce to produce large, white patches on the upper leaf surface.  Eventually, the damage becomes yellow-to-copper colored and the overall damage can produce early leaf drop....

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Joe Boggs
White Pine Weevil Damage is Becoming Evident boggs.47 Thu, 06/23/2016 - 21:59

White pine weevil (Pissodes strobi) larval feeding damage is now becoming very evident in southern Ohio.  This means that localized weevil populations may be reduced by removing and destroying infested conifer terminals.  Overwintered females deposit eggs in early spring in the terminals of a wide range of conifers including Douglas-fir, all spruces, as well as Scotch, jack, red, pitch, and eastern white pines.  After the eggs hatch, the resulting white, legless, slightly curved, grub-like larvae tunnel downward just beneath the bark feeding on phloem tissue until pupation.  The...

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Joe Boggs
Translucent Oak Galls boggs.47 Thu, 06/23/2016 - 21:54

One of my all-time favorite plant galls is the appropriately named Translucent Oak Gall.  The galls are produced by the gall-wasp, Amphibolips nubilipennis (family Cynipidae).  They arise from a leaf vein on the lower leaf surface and measure around 1/2 - 3/4" in diameter.  Their shape and color causes them to strongly resemble tiny, pink balloons or pink grapes hanging beneath the leaves of red, scarlet, and black oaks. 

...

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Joe Boggs
Orange Rust on Thornless Blackberries draper.15 Wed, 06/22/2016 - 22:20

Recently in Northeast Ohio, the fungal disease known as Orange Rust is beginning to rear its unique, but strange symptoms on brambles, which are also known as cane berries.  Specifically, this fungus most often infects black and purple raspberries and sometimes is found on thornless blackberries, but is not known to infect red raspberries.

For me personally, this is the first time in my 24 years as an Extension Educator, that I have seen this disease on thornless blackberries.  Most often, this fungus is evident on either thorned blackberries or purple raspberries.  It is...

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Erik Draper
Maple: Not Anthracnose chatfield.1 Wed, 06/22/2016 - 13:27

On June 18 I sent a byglalert about maple anthracnose diagnosed earlier this spring. The plant disease symptoms (see below) for that byglalert item included discolored blotches on the foliage which coalesced along leaf veins. The sample above for this alert today, sent from OSU Extension in Morrow County, show symptoms of leaf discoloration between the veins. This is the classic difference between physiological leaf scorch (this case) and anthracnose fungal disease (the previous case). The difference is all in the details. Physiological leaf scorch can be caused by many...

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Jim Chatfield
All In chatfield.1 Wed, 06/22/2016 - 12:36
This past Sunday: Before and After The Game. Note there are more trees!
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Jim Chatfield
SAVE THE DATE - 89th Annual Green Industry Short Course stone.91 Tue, 06/21/2016 - 15:49

Save these Dates - December 5, 6, 7 and 8, 2016!

 

The 89th Annual OSU Green Industry Short Course is partnering the Ohio Turfgrass Foundation (OTF) to present cutting-edge education on a wide range of horticultural topics at the Greater Columbus Convention Center.  Four days of amazing programming  includes a  pre-conference session called  Trees on Tap on December 5th.  Don't miss this opportunity for networking, up-to-date information and continuing education credits.  Mark your calendars and  save December 5, 6, 7 and 8th now and we will send you updates on the...

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Denise Johnson
Gypsy Moth Caterpillars Continue to Munch in NW Ohio stone.91 Tue, 06/21/2016 - 15:07

See-through-trees?  What could it be? 

 

Upon closer inspection of this building's foundation planting in Toledo, Ohio, the crabapple and beech trees were being fed upon by gypsy moth catepillars.  It appears they began their feeding frenzy on the crabapple, and once those leaves were eaten, they quickly moved out and began feeding on the beech trees on either side.  What you don't see in the photo are several spruce trees that are also a caterpillar favorite.  The tree that was missing at this location and is the caterpillar's favorite, is the oak.  But even without its...

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Amy Stone
Even in Scarlet and Gray country, these Maize and Blue planes are welcome stone.91 Tue, 06/21/2016 - 14:31

This is a Media Release from the Ohio Department of Agriculture, Brett Gates, Deputy Communication Director . 

 

As Columbus commuters and residents go about their routines on Tuesday, June 21, they are likely to notice these yellow airplanes gracing the skies of the capital city:

 

The Ohio Department of Agriculture wants to make folks aware that these airplanes are fighting back against the gypsy moth, a pest that can wreak havoc on over 300 different types of our trees and shrubs while feeding on their foliage. The gypsy moth has been such a pest...

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Amy Stone

Goose No Fly Zone During Molting

At the end of June and into the first few weeks of July, something happens to Ohio's goose population. Homeowners that have been harassing (or scaring) geese off their property may notice that now, the geese just aren't flying away. There is a reason your property has become a no-fly zone - the adults are molting their flight feathers. This process takes a few weeks during which, the adults are unable to fly. Couple that with a clutch of young goslings that are not able to spread their wings yet, and you have several sitting ducks (or in this case, geese!). Unfortunately, damage (and the...

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Marne Titchenell

Sssssssnakes in the Garden

 

SSSSSSSSSNAKES IN THE GARDEN. It is not uncommon this time of year to encounter a slithery visitor in gardens, landscapes, and backyards. There are several species of snakes happy to live their lives in backyards, but one of the most common is the eastern gartern snake. Named for the 3 light stripes that run along the length of its black, brown, gray, or olive body, the garter snake is sometimes nicknamed the 'garden' snake because that is where unsuspecting gardeners often encounter them. The stripes running vertically along the length of the snake's body resemble the once...

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Marne Titchenell
BYGL Mail, Part Two: Week of June 13 chatfield.1 Sat, 06/18/2016 - 23:50

More responses from bygl-alert readers:

3). Tom Holcomb wrote that: 

Our 80-year old plus parents have a gorgeous huge tulip poplar. Earlier it was full of blossoms. Squirrels have nipped most of them off.  They believed this is the first year that this is happened. Wondering if there is a reason/explanation for this?  

I do not know the answer, but one possibility is that this is due to the large amount of nectar produced by tuliptree (another name for tulip poplar) flowers. If so, their behavior is not so squirrely, after all.

 

4). ...

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Jim Chatfield

BYGL Mail, Part 1, Week of June 13

Below are a few selected bygl-alert user comments from mid-June.

1). Mary Beth Breckenridge wrote:

Read your cicada article in BYGL with interest. But have you eaten one?

I have not, but the outstanding writer and journalist Mary Beth, of northeast Ohio’s Beacon Journal newspaper has, and to prove it, go to:

 https://www.facebook.com/MBBreckABJ/videos/10154444348473296/

Collin Foltz,  a student in my OSU Sustainable Landscape Maintenance class this...

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Jim Chatfield

Purple-Flowered Raspberry

The time of eating the woodsy fruits of raspberries is beginning, but the genus for raspberries and blackberries (Rubus) is not just for eating.  The purple-flowered raspberry (Rubus odoratus) is a small- to medium-sized (3 to 8 feet) native shrub in the rose family (Rosaceae).  In both woodlands (I saw it this week at Mohican State Park) and for landscapes this raspberry is a welcome sight. It has maple-like leaves (but alternate rather than opposite leaf arrangement) and sparse wine-like purple flowers. These flowers almost remind you, appropriately so, of – small wild...

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Jim Chatfield
Yellow Poplar Weevil on Tuliptree chatfield.1 Sat, 06/18/2016 - 10:34

Yellow poplar weevil (Odontopus calceatus) is a snout beetle that causes mostly cosmetic damage on tuliptree (also known as yellow poplar and tulip poplar), sassafras, and certain magnolias. I noted damage on tuliptree this past week while also noting developing cicada tree flagging also occurring on tuliptree. Damage on tuliptree leaves includes little bean-shaped scar-like pits in leaves due to epidermal feeding by the weevil adults and larger leaf blotch mines by the weevil larvae. Damage is usually just cosmetic, but in outbreaks may result is a scorched appearance to the...

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Jim Chatfield

Where Have All The Maple Seedlings Gone?

Many have noted this Spring that there are not as many red maple (Acer rubrum) seedlings popping up in flower beds. This was illustrated for me this past Saturday (June 11) when crossing the footbridge adjacent to the B & O Harmar Bridge, spanning the Muskingum River from Marietta proper to Harmar Village in southern Ohio.  I visited this bridge for the first time on June 21, 2013 and at the time took a picture then of the many red maple seedlings sprouting from the wooden railroad ties of the railroad bridge. This year, almost nada for red maple seedlings.  

 

...
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Jim Chatfield

Cicadaville

If you look at a map of the emergence of Brood V of the 17-year cicadas, Magicicada septendecim (what a great name!), for example at cicadamania.com, it looks like almost the entire eastern half of Ohio was destined for the same experience. As we know by now, though, it is not one size fits all. Go to the OSU Mansfield Campus and the cacophony is big-time, go to Wooster and it is the late spring quietude, until dog-day cicadas, which we hear every year arrive later in the summer. Twenty miles south at Mohican State Park and the male cicadas choir is signing in noticeable numbers....

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Jim Chatfield
ODA Annouces Gypsy Moth Mating Disruption Treatments In Central Ohio stone.91 Tue, 06/14/2016 - 22:20

On Tuesday, June 14, 2016 the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) announced that they will begin aerial treatments designed to disrupt gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) mating this summer in central Ohio. 

 

The gypsy moth is a non-native species that feeds on more than 300 different trees and shrubs, and is especially fond of oaks (Quercus spp.) while in its devastating caterpillar stage.  While healthy plants can usually withstand one or two years of defoliation, repeat feeding injury coupled with a drought or other pest pressures, can cause host plant ...

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Amy Stone

Nutrient Deficiency Case Study on Colorado Blue Spruce

While BYGL Alerts are intended to provide fast-hitting information, sometimes it's important for us to take a little more time - and space - to dig deeper.  Our Southwest Ohio Diagnostic Walk-About group visited Stanley Rowe Arboretum yesterday and revisited an interesting nutrient deficiency problem that was observed by the group on Colorado blue spruce during our Walk-About last year.

...

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Joe Boggs
Let's Go on a Snipe Hunt boggs.47 Tue, 06/14/2016 - 18:04

The golden-backed snipe fly (Chrysopilus thoracicus) is one of the most beautiful insects you'll run across in Ohio forests.   Both the common and scientific names are very descriptive for this native fly.  The top of the thorax (= the "back") is covered in highly reflective golden colored hairs; "Chysopilus" means "golden hair."  The fly's body and wing veins are bluish-black and the abdomen has lateral white markings.

 

Little appears to be known regarding the fly's life-style.  The adults have been observed visiting the flowers of a number of native plants,...

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Joe Boggs
Fluffy, White Planthopper Nymphs are Becoming Evident boggs.47 Tue, 06/14/2016 - 17:30

Clusters of fluffy, white planthopper nymphs are appearing on the stems of annuals, perennials, and the lower branches of trees and shrubs in southern Ohio.  Planthoppers belong to the Family Flatidae (Order Hemiptera; Suborder Auchenorrhyncha), and are sometimes referred to as "flatids."  Planthopper adults are 1/4- 3/8" long, purplish blue, lime green, or powdery white, and they hold their broad wings vertically in a tent-like fashion covering the sides of the body and legs.

...
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Joe Boggs
Smokebush Arisin' chatfield.1 Tue, 06/14/2016 - 14:14

One of the wondrous sights this time of the year is the ethereal inflorescent pufflike panicles of smokebush or smoketree (Cotinus) flower heads.  There are two species, our native Cotinus obovatus, a larger plant much used on the High Line Park in New York City and Cotinus coggygria, the European smokebush.  This genus is in the Anacardiaceae family, cousins to poison ivy (Rhus or Toxicodendron species), cashew, mango, and pistachio. 

 

...

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Jim Chatfield

I Love Peonies! and Time for Post-Bloom Followup

Peonies in central Ohio are now finished blooming but wow what a bloom this year.  They had just about perfect weather to provide a wonderful display.  Now they they are finished blooming, you can clean up the dead blooms (deadhead) and have pretty nice looking foliage plants in the perennial bed the rest of the season.  Remove the dead blooms by going down into the plant, going below the top layer of foliage. 

 

...

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Pam Bennett
Elm Insect Duo chatfield.1 Tue, 06/14/2016 - 01:54

I recently looked at some elms on Columbus city streets and took some images of two insects on one leaf, though mostly on lower leafs and trunk sprouts. One insect was a wasp leafminer, Fenusa ulmi.  The larvae of this insect “mine” plant leaf cells for their nutritive value. It is a native insect and generally is worse on non-native elm species and those hybrids with some Asian or European elm genetics. Typically, insecticides are not recommended but labeled systemic insecticides may be useful in situations where applications are warranted.

 

...

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Jim Chatfield
Curtis E. Young
BYGLosophy: Mozart and Thee chatfield.1 Mon, 06/13/2016 - 20:00

The 9th time you have explained that soil and its effects on roots are the key to plant health… Your new landscape company and the difficulty of explaining your well-grounded vision of plant health management…Trying to convince your friends of the elegance of Townes Van Zandt’s lyrics…Getting everyone to see how cool byglalerts are as they show up on your phone…Sometimes only time will tell your truths to the rest of the world.  Do not despair: it is always thus.

As such, I started reading the book Mozart in the Jungle by Blair Tindall the other day and the lead quote was...

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Jim Chatfield
Oak Apple Wasp Galls boggs.47 Mon, 06/13/2016 - 10:38

While hiking (sweating!) along a forested walking trail near my home over the weekend, I came across several types of oak apple wasp galls on their namesake hosts.  These unusual plant growths can range in size at maturity from 1/2 - 2" in diameter and are named for their resemblance to apples.  The galls are constructed of leaf tissue that has been hijacked by a gall wasp (Family Cynipidae) to surround a single wasp larva located within a seed-like structure positioned at the center of the gall.  The exact species of gall-wasp that is responsible for producing the oak-apple gall can be...

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Joe Boggs
Lace Bug Damage Becoming Evident in Southwest Ohio boggs.47 Mon, 06/13/2016 - 10:30

Lace bugs were very successful with overwintering in southwest Ohio and high populations are now producing noticeable symptoms.  The most obvious lace bugs include:  basswood lace bug (Gargaphia tiliae), hawthorn lace bug (Corythucha cydoniae), and oak lace bug (C. arcuata).  Sycamore lace bug (C. incurvata) is showing up on trees that were less affected by sycamore anthracnose this spring.

...
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Joe Boggs
Pear Rust in Ohio? chatfield.1 Sun, 06/12/2016 - 11:57

We are all used to seeing cedar apple rust, cedar hawthorn rust and cedar quince rust fungi on their dual hosts of junipers and Rosaceous hosts such as apple, crabapple, the occasional quince, and perhaps serviceberry in Ohio. I was much surprised to see what I think are Callery pear trees speckled with bright orange-red rust symptoms in German Village in Columbus this past week, however.

 

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Jim Chatfield
Fireblight This Time chatfield.1 Sun, 06/12/2016 - 10:34

Fireblight on Callery pear is highlighted against the blue sky in Columbus’s German Village this past Thursday in the lead photo of this byglalert, with a different look in the second photo taken with a different sun angle, important to remember when seeing images and thinking “it doesn’t look quite like what I saw”. Fireblight symptoms of “shepherd’s crook” shoots and discolored leaves are common to see now, following infections which occurred weeks, even months earlier in cool, warm weather during bloom. 

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Jim Chatfield
Firs for Ohio: Who Ya Gonna Believe? chatfield.1 Fri, 06/10/2016 - 15:48

The other day I was chatting with Joe Boggs after a program at OSU-Mansfield and regaled the beautiful white firs (Abies concolor) on the campus there. I mentioned that I thought this species of fir was the best-suited for Ohio landscapes, channeling a long-held and repeated opinion that other firs, such as Fraser do not do as well here due to hot summers, preferring North Carolina mountain country and New Hampshire and northern Michigan climes.

For the first times in our lives (not!) Joe disagreed with me. He has considerable cred here, having worked on Christmas tree...

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Jim Chatfield
Joe Boggs
Blistered Oak Leaves boggs.47 Thu, 06/09/2016 - 21:57

Oak leaf blister is a disease is caused by the fungus, Taphrina caerulescens.  The fungus overwinters in infected buds and twigs.  Leaf infections occur during moist periods in the spring as leaves emerge.  Early symptoms appear as raised, blister-like, light-green to yellowish-green spots on the upper leaf surface matched with deep depressions on the lower leaf surface.  Eventually, the leaf "blisters" become very apparent as they turn dark brown to brownish-black.  The blisters may be evenly distributed across the leaf and are distinct from the angular, vein-based symptoms...

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Joe Boggs
Snow White Black Knot boggs.47 Thu, 06/09/2016 - 21:48

I planted a multi-stemmed Canada red chokecherry (Prunus virginiana 'Shubert') years ago in my landscaping so I could admire the deep, purplish-red foliage; a signature display of this selection.  Of course, that was before anyone knew it’s a magnet for the fungus, Apiosporina morbosa; the plant pathogen that causes black knot.  The disease is characterized by thick, corky, elongated gall-growths on twigs and branches that become coal-black late in the growing season; thus the common name for the disease.  Black knot is now the signature display of many Canada red...

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Joe Boggs
Fall Webworms in Spring? boggs.47 Thu, 06/09/2016 - 21:43

First generation fall webworms (Hyphantria cunea) are appearing in central and southern Ohio.  Fall webworm moths typically have two generations per year in Ohio and despite their common name, first generation nests usually appear in late spring.  Fall webworm caterpillars only feed on the leaves that are enveloped by their silk nest.  As caterpillars grow in size, they expand their nest by casting silk over more leaves to accommodate their expanding appetites.

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Joe Boggs
Tupelo, Honey chatfield.1 Thu, 06/09/2016 - 12:59

In my back yard there are two sourgums, also known as blackgum or tupelo, with the lovely Latin binomial of Nyssa sylvatica. I grew them from young plants sold to me by Kenny Cochran at Secrest Arboretum, and now they have grown to the age that they are producing not only their glossy green leaves but also -  flowers.  

As the Missouri Botanical Garden website indicates, flowers are: “Primarily dioecious (separate male and female trees), but each tree often has some perfect flowers. Small, greenish-white flowers appear in spring on long stalks (female flowers in sparse...

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Jim Chatfield
One More Anthranose: Maple This TIme chatfield.1 Thu, 06/09/2016 - 12:14

In previous BYGLs this spring, we have noted the occurrence of heavy sycamore anthracnose statewide, and also of ash, beech, and oak anthracnose in southwest Ohio. This report from northeast Ohio is of one of the maple anthracnose fungal diseases. I was called out to a landscape in Doylestown Ohio where the homeowners were very concerned that “all of the leaves are fallin’” from a beloved maple tree that towers over their deck. We are all familiar with this sky-is-falling observation which in most cases turns out to be a bit overstated due to worry.

At most, probably less than 1%...

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Jim Chatfield
Elm Galls And More chatfield.1 Thu, 06/09/2016 - 11:27

It is often said that a picture tells a thousand words. In this case, perhaps a few less, but it does tell multiple and layered stories. First, as shown by this image, one of the plant ID characteristics of elm (Ulmus) leaves is the uneven base to the leaf blade as shown here. This was the main point for the attendees at a recent Name That Tree program of OSU Extension at the OSU Mansfield campus. Secondly, of all the gall, the elm cockscomb gall insect (Colopha ulmicola) induced the DNA of this elm leaf to produce a proud new home for the insect’s progeny. Thirdly...

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Jim Chatfield
Joe Boggs
Antlions Are On the Hunt boggs.47 Wed, 06/08/2016 - 16:47

Ron Wilson (Natorp's) shared an e-mail message with me this morning from a listener of his radio show about a strange insect that kept "trying to cover itself with dirt."  An ID didn't come to my mind … I claim because of a lack of coffee rather than an age-related issue.  Ron chided me by repeating the part about the insect trying to cover itself with dirt.  My last functional neuron fired and I realized the message was about one of our favorite insects:  antions (Myrmeleon immaculatus).

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Joe Boggs
Holey Thistle! boggs.47 Tue, 06/07/2016 - 21:38

Damage from the non-native thistle tortoise beetle (Cassida rubiginosa) is beginning to appear on its non-native, invasive host, Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense), in southwest Ohio.  The beetles are pale green or yellowish-green which allows them to blend with their host's leaves.  Like other tortoise beetles, the adults have a body shaped like a flattened pith helmet.  The head and legs of the adults are typically hidden under the flares of their helmet-like body.  The antennae can be hidden or extended out from underneath the front of the beetle.

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Joe Boggs
Who's Spittin' on My Dogwoods? boggs.47 Tue, 06/07/2016 - 21:31

During today's weekly BYGL Inservice, Amanda Bennett (OSU Extension, Miami County) shared some striking images of the frothy, spittle-like masses produced by dogwood spittlebug (Clastoptera proteus) on its namesake host.  Spittlebug (family Cercopidae) nymphs are responsible for producing the frothy masses; adults of these insects are called "froghoppers" and have an entirely different life style. 

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Joe Boggs
Towering Poison Hemlock boggs.47 Mon, 06/06/2016 - 20:56

Poison hemlock (Conium maculatum) is among the most deadly plants in North America.  This non-native invasive weed contains highly toxic piperidine alkaloid compounds, including coniine and gamma-coniceine, which cause respiratory failure and death when ingested by mammals.  The roots are more toxic than the leaves and stems; however, all parts of the plant including the seeds should be considered dangerous.  It is a common misconception that poison hemlock sap will cause skin rashes and blisters.  In fact, poison hemlock toxins must be ingested or enter through the eyes, cuts, or...

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Joe Boggs
Calico Scale Crawlers on the Move boggs.47 Mon, 06/06/2016 - 20:41

Calico scale (Eulecanium cerasorum) 1st instar nymphs (crawlers) have been on the move in southwest Ohio and most have already settled on the undersides of leaves of infested host trees.  The tiny, tannish-brown, oblong-shaped crawlers are around 1/16" in length.  After hatching from eggs beneath females located on stems, the crawlers migrate to the undersides of leaves.  They position themselves along leaf veins where they insert their piercing-sucking mouthparts into phloem vessels to extract amino acids that are dissolved in the sugary plant sap.

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Joe Boggs
Hemlock Pine? chatfield.1 Mon, 06/06/2016 - 14:29

We sometimes forget “what it was like not to know”, when it comes to plant identification. Yet, it is essential when it comes to selecting and maintenance of plants. A simple misidentification of a pine vs. a spruce can result in improper pruning timing or improper diagnostics, prognostics, and recommended management for a disease: Diplodia tip blight of pine and Cytospora  canker of spruce are different diseases, obviously on different –plants. And spruces do not have “pine cones”.

 

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Jim Chatfield
Joe Boggs
Trees Take Flight chatfield.1 Sun, 06/05/2016 - 17:20

At a recent tree identification workshop I brought some samples of hedge maple (Acer campestre) and when the learners were keying these out I noted to them that stems had “wings”. Several attendees were more quizzical than usual at my ramblings and asked what I meant. “Wings” or raised or corky projections on stems of woody plants are perhaps most common with regard to winged euonymus (Euonymus alatus) from the Latin alatus which means “having wings or winglike extensions”.

There are many additional woody plant species that have “wings”, though, including...

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Jim Chatfield
Enjoy the Orchid-Like Catalpa Blooms! boggs.47 Sun, 06/05/2016 - 16:40

I'm an unabashed lover of catalpa trees.  Yes, they are messy, but so are many of our "preferred" native and non-native landscape trees.  I loathe the subjective tree descriptor of "messy" because it removed so many wonderful trees from our landscape palette (e.g. sycamores).

Of course, catalpas do occasionally play host to hungry hordes of their very own caterpillar; catalpa hornworms are the larval form of the catalpa sphinx moth (Ceratomia catalpae).  The caterpillars only feed on catalpa trees.  However, as I discovered with a huge northern catalpa (Catalpa...

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Joe Boggs
Phomopsis Gall in Hickory chatfield.1 Sun, 06/05/2016 - 10:09

Phomopsis Gall on Hickory. 

An arboretum walk, a mature tree flowering and leafing out, a lovely spring day, a – gall. A bunch of galls, in fact, on this one tree. At first glance, the galls looked like horned-oak or gouty oak galls, round to oblong stem galls that occur on oak. The areas on the stems even looked sort of oak-ish at first, with masses of pollen-bearing male catkins evident. Not an oak, though, as the compound leaves attested. It was a hickory, and the galls, unlike the insect-induced horned oak and gouty oak galls, were caused by a fungus, the Phomopsis  ...

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Jim Chatfield
Joe Boggs
Horned Oak Gall Leaf Galls boggs.47 Sat, 06/04/2016 - 18:03

When most people think of horned oak galls, they visualize the gnarled, woody stem galls that form on the twigs and small branches of pin oaks.  This is understandable since the gall-making wasp, Callirhytis cornigera (Family Cynipidae) that's responsible for directing the growth of the stem galls spends 33 months developing inside individual chambers within these very obvious galls.

The galls grow larger in size with each season.  In early spring, as the immature wasps near the completion of their development, the whitish-tan, cone-shaped “horns” that give this gall its...

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Joe Boggs
Oak Marginal Leaf Fold Gall boggs.47 Sat, 06/04/2016 - 17:57

So-called marginal leaf fold galls are appearing on oaks in the "red oak group" in southwest Ohio.  The galls appear as rolled or folded leaf margins and are produced by a gall-making midge fly, Macrodiplosis erubescens (Family Cecidomyiidae).  As with the vast majority of oak galls, the leaf fold galls cause no appreciable harm to the overall health of affected oaks.  However, the gall has become notorious in recent years for its connection to a non-native predaceous mite (Pyemotes herfsi) that may feed on the gall-making midge fly larvae (maggots).  The mite...

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Joe Boggs
Erineum Patches on American Beech Leaves boggs.47 Sat, 06/04/2016 - 17:51

The felt-like erineum patches produced by the eriophyid mite, Acalitus fagerinea, on the upper leaf surfaces of American beech are now appearing in southwest Ohio.  Currently, the patches are light-yellow.  However, they progress through several color stages throughout the season from light green in the spring to brilliant yellow to yellowish-gold then rusty red to reddish-brown and finally dark brown.

Although the patches are located on the upper leaf surface, they cause a dimpling of the lower leaf surface beneath the patch. 

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Joe Boggs
More Anthracnose boggs.47 Sat, 06/04/2016 - 17:43

Last week, we reported that leaf and stem symptoms of the fungal disease known as sycamore anthracnose were becoming evident on the namesake host in many areas of Ohio.  This week, we're adding ash, oak, and beech to the list of foliar anthracnose diseases appearing in the southwest part of the state.  It's important to keep in mind that the anthracnose diseases affecting sycamore, ash, oak, and beech are each produced by a different host-specific fungus.  The fungus that produces anthracnose on sycamore does not infect ash, oak, or beech and vice versa; the fungus responsible for ash...

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Joe Boggs

Wild Parsnip is Blooming in Southern Ohio

Wild parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) plants are rising towards their full height and blooms are beginning to appear in southern Ohio.  Landscape managers and gardeners should exercise extreme caution around this non-native invasive plant; the plant's juices can cause phytophotodermatitis (a.k.a. Berloque dermatitis).   If plant juices contact skin and the skin is then exposed to sunlight (specifically ultraviolet light), severe blistering can occur, as well as skin discoloration that may last several months. 

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Joe Boggs

Willow Woes

First generation imported willow leaf beetles (Plagiodera versicolora) are munching the leaves of wild and cultivated willows in southwest Ohio.  This native of northern Europe was first found in the U.S. in 1915.  Since that time, it has become well established throughout most of the eastern and Midwestern states.  Although it has been a number of years since a significant outbreak has been reported in Ohio, this beetle has a history of periodically achieving population outbreak densities and causing significant defoliation of its namesake host.

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Joe Boggs

Sawfly Slugged Rose Leaves

Heavy leaf damage from the non-native bristly roseslug sawfly (Cladius difformis) is becoming very apparent on its namesake host in southwest Ohio.  Roses in Ohio may be infested by this sawfly as well as two other non-native species:  the European roseslug sawfly (Endelomyia aethiops); and the curled roseslug sawfly (Allantus cinctus).  Despite their common names, the larvae of these sawflies resemble tiny caterpillars and look nothing like the glistening, elongated pear-shaped "slug sawflies" which do resemble tiny slugs.

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Joe Boggs