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Diagnostic Workshop: What's Wrong With My Tree?

Workshop Name:  Tree Diagnostic Workshop - What’s Wrong With My Tree?

 

Workshop Date:  Friday, August 4, 2017

 

Event Location:  Ohio State University Mansfield, 100 Ovalwood Hall, 1760 University Drive, Mansfield, Ohio

 

This Ohio Woodland Stewards Program spends the day with Extension specialists to diagnose some common and not so common tree problems. Learn what trees need immediate attention from what is just cosmetic and won’t compromise the health of the tree. 

 

Ask questions and get answers and find...

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Authors
Amy Stone
Kathy Smith

Creeping Flecks of Gold and Animated Piles of Frass

Look closely at the leaves of ornamental sweet potatoes, morning glories, or bindweed for flecks of gold creeping across the lower leaf surfaces; those would be Golden Tortoise Beetles (Charidotella sexpunctata). They are also called “sweet potato beetles” because of their common occurrence on both cultivated and ornamental sweet potatoes and “goldbugs” because of their appearance.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Trefoil Foiling Lawns, Landscapes, and Naturalized Areas

The bright yellow floral display currently blanketing some lawns and roadway right-of-ways is being produced by Birdsfoot Trefoil. The yellow flowers are smaller than dandelion flowers, bigger than those of black medic, and resemble buttercups from a distance. This non-native plant was imported with good intentions, but is now gaining weed status in lawns, landscapes, and naturalized areas in Ohio. Yet another example of unintended consequences with introducing non-natives.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Killers Welcome Cicada Emergence

Annual Dog-Day Cicadas emerging in southwest Ohio are being “welcomed” by their nemesis, Cicada Killer Wasps. This is the largest wasp found in Ohio and the annual cicadas are their select prey. An abrupt halt in the buzzing of a cicada, often punctuated by a high-pitched screech, usually means a wasp has committed an insecticidal act
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Coneflower Calamities

Participants at yesterday’s S.W. Ohio Diagnostic Walk-About viewed two problems on purple coneflowers; one potentially more calamitous than the other. The first was the handiwork of the Sunflower Head-Clipping Weevil (Haplorhynchites aeneus) which included dangling seed heads and stems that looked like soda straws. The second were stunted plants and deformed plant parts caused by the phytoplasma disease known as Aster Yellows.
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Authors
Joe Boggs