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Tree of the Week: Bladdernut

Now we turn to a second plant identification discussion from arborist Carrie Paulus: this one of a native small tree or large shrub.  The above photograph is credited to Carrie.  She saw this small tree with husband Bill at Lake Hope State Park on Mother’s Day.  It is bladdernut, Staphylea trifolia.  It is not rare in Ohio woodlands, but often it is not noticed.

 

  Bladdernut eludes the usual mnemonics for native woodland trees with opposite leaf arrangement such as MAD BUCK (maple, ash, dogwood, buckeye) or BAMEV DOGWOOD (same along with tree-sized euonymus and...

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Jim Chatfield
Poison Hemlock is Flowering and Towering Over Fields and Landscapes in Southern Ohio. boggs.47 Fri, 05/19/2017 - 13:35
Poison hemlock (Conium maculatum) is one of the most lethal plants found in North America. This biennial weed is now producing flowers in southwest Ohio. So, the clock is ticking on preventing seed production by this non-native invasive plant.
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Joe Boggs

Hawthorn Leafminers Have Completed Their Development in S.W. Ohio

On April 11, I reported that the adults of three leafmining sawflies were mating and laying eggs on their host trees in southwest Ohio (see BYGL Alert! Sawfly Leafminers Fly). Today, I noticed some heavy leafmining damage by one of the sawflies, the Hawthorn Leafminer (Profenusa canadensis), on its namesake host in a hospital parking lot in the southwest part of the state.
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Joe Boggs

Mulberry Whitefly "Pupae" Can Present an ID Challenge

Participants in Monday's Southwest Ohio BYGLive! Diagnostic Walk-About held at Stanley Rowe Arboretum observed final instar nymphs, called "pupae," of the Mulberry Whitefly (Tetraleurodes mori) on the undersides of holly leaves. The round, shiny black pupae are ringed in a white fringe and are commonly mistaken for a scale insect. Indeed, whiteflies are not "flies" (order Diptera); they belong to the same order (Hemiptera) as scale insects and share certain traits with both armored and soft scale insects.
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Joe Boggs

Enkianthus: Shrub of the Week

Several years back I bought this shade-loving shrub at one of the Secrest Arboretum sales.  This is the first year it has flowered.  I can’t find the tag naming the plant.  Can you ID it for me? - Thanks, Skip

 

  This was the e-mail impetus for this bygl-alert, coming from Dr. Skip Nault, Professor Emeritus, entomologist, and former Director of the Ohio State University’s Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) in Wooster. The pictures in this alert are from Skip. 

 

  The answer to Skip’s question is that it is a...

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Jim Chatfield