Hort Shorts

Blue Lupine in Bloom

Northwest Ohio is celebrating Blue Week, May 16 - 23, 2017. A symbol of the Oak Openings Region, the wild blue lupine is a native plant that can be found not only growing, but thriving in sandy soils including at the sand dunes in Oak Openings Metropark and Kitty Todd Nature Preserve - both in Lucas County. This brilliant blue flowering plant had been lost in this natural landscape in the 1980s as a result of mowing the prairie-type habitat, the use of broad spectrum weed control, and fire suppression. However, it has recently made a come-back in natural areas and gardeners are planting it...

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Authors
Amy Stone

Recent Cold Temperatures Leaves a Variable Path of Damage to Plants in Ohio

Depending on your geographical location in Ohio, the location of the plant, the actual low temperature, the plant species, as well as the growth stage on the species, the results of frost and freeze damage was variable across the state this past week.  Frost and freeze damage is so interesting because of so many variables.  A plant in a certain stage of growth may be more susceptible to frost or freeze damage than at other times.  The location of the plant in the garden may dictate the extent of the damage.  For instance, there might be two of the exact same plants in the same garden with...

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Authors
Pam Bennett

Garden Centers are Stuffed to the Gills!

On recent visits to area gardens centers I noticed that they are filled with inventory and bursting at the seams!  Since we haven't had the best weather for the first part of May, garden center owners are looking for an incredible Mother's Day weekend - the busiest day of the year for them.  The weather so far looks to be promising not only for this weekend but also for next week.  Plants are looking good right now but they need to be moved out the door and into gardens in order to make way for the next crop that is pushing right behind!

 

A reminder to gardeners that once...

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Authors
Pam Bennett

Lovely Lilacs Lure Lads and Lassies to the Landscape

Lilacs, the fragrance, the beauty, the grace, the colors. Lilacs can come in all shapes, sizes ans colors. From pale purple to deep purple and white; whether a small, low shrub, a mature shrub to a upright, standard tree form, there is one to fit most landscapes. But even when they can't be seen, the fragrance attracts not only pollinators but people as well.
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Authors
Thomas deHaas

Doggone Gorgeous Dogwoods!

Here in Northeast Ohio, it has been an incredible year for observing bloom of ornamental flowering trees.  I propose that both the marvelous color and length of bloom is due to the bursts of very warm temperatures (70’s), followed by days of cooler temperatures (50’s), with a day or two of rain mixed in to keep things fresh!  The warm temperatures caused the buds to push fast into full bloom; however, then the cool temps and the rains move in preserving not only the colors, but also prolonging the length of bloom appeal and persistence on the plants.

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Authors
Erik Draper

Sassafras: Tree of the Week

  Sassafras was the bygl-alert Tree of the Week last July 29, but a reprise is in order. First of all, the emerging leaves and flowers have blown me away anew this Spring. Secondly, such a great horticulturist as Deb Knapke e-mailed me that “This is the first time I have seen the flowers of sassafras; loved it!” in response to the use of a sassafras flower picture in one of my Springtime bygl-alerts this year. 

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Authors
Jim Chatfield

Wall of Wisteria

As I was driving along the other day, it was raining and I was watching the road and the plants around me of course, when suddenly, out of the corner of my eye, I saw a flash of purple.  Intrigued, I just had to investigate and find out what the heck was going on with the purple flash!
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Authors
Erik Draper

Spruce Problem On Commercial Property

  Recently OSU Extensioneers Tim Malinich and Jim Chatfield met with horticulturists at a property in northern Ohio to look at a number of declining spruce trees. Most of the spruces on the property appeared healthy but a number had needle browning and and branch dieback, ranging from minor to severe.

  Some of the needle discoloration ascended the tree in somewhat of a spiral pattern, sometimes it was more complete, with some trees if not dead or dying, at the least becoming aesthetic liabilities. There was no evidence on the spruces at this property of any significant infectious...

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Authors
Jim Chatfield