Bug Bytes

Gnarled Oak Leaf Midge Galls boggs.47 Wed, 05/03/2017 - 18:38
I've recently gotten e-mail messages with images of a gnarly looking leaf gall appearing on pin oaks in Cincinnati, OH, and Lexington, KY. The unsightly, lumpy growths are produced by a gnat-like gall-midge (Macrodiplosis niveipila, family Cecidomyiidae) and have the descriptive common name of Gnarled Oak Leaf Midge Galls.
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Joe Boggs
Hydrangea Leaftier Oddball Damage boggs.47 Tue, 05/02/2017 - 16:45
I first came across the odd looking handiwork of Hydrangea Leaftier Moth (Family Tortricidae; Olethreutes ferriferana) caterpillars several years ago on its native namesake host in Clifton Gorge in Greene County, OH. Since that time, I've commonly found this leaftier on wild and cultivated hydrangeas at other locations.
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Joe Boggs
Holey Oak Leaves! boggs.47 Tue, 05/02/2017 - 16:32
Look closely at developing oak leaves for Spiny Oak Sawfly (Periclista albicollis) larvae. The small, light-green, semi-transparent larvae have shiny black head capsules and are covered with rows of forked (bifurcated) spines. Their small size coupled with their coloration allows these larvae to easily blend with their leaf-food background.
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Joe Boggs
Please Report Early-Bird Periodical Cicadas boggs.47 Mon, 05/01/2017 - 10:12
Periodical Cicadas (Magicicada spp.) take either 17 or 13 years to complete their development and emerge from the soil en masse as different "broods" in the spring. The only periodical cicada brood that's forecast to emerge this year is Brood VI. However, there is a prediction that we will see an "early emergence" of some members of Brood X this spring even though adults of this brood are not expected to emerge full-force until 2021.
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Joe Boggs
Slugged Rose Leaves boggs.47 Thu, 04/27/2017 - 16:36
Roseslug sawflies were once generally considered only nuisance pests of roses in Ohio. The Common Roseslug Sawfly was most often encountered followed occasionally by the Curled Roseslug. The common roseslug has only one generation and the curled roseslug two generations. These sawflies would come and go so quickly they seldom caused appreciable damage.
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Joe Boggs
Corrugated River Birch Leaves boggs.47 Thu, 04/27/2017 - 14:37
The unusual leaf distortion damage caused by the spiny witchhazel gall aphid (Hamamelistes spinosus) is now appearing on river birch in southwest Ohio. The aphid produces raised ribs or "corrugations" on the upper leaf surface that match deep furrows between the veins on the lower leaf surface where the aphids live.
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Joe Boggs
First Generation Pine Needle Scale Crawlers are Afoot. boggs.47 Tue, 04/25/2017 - 19:01
First generation Pine Needle Scale (Chionaspis pinifoliae) crawlers (1st instar nymphs) are now appearing on conifers in southwest Ohio. This is a type of "armored" scale so-named because of the hard, waxy cover (test) that protects the females. The egg-shaped pine needle scale tests are snow white with a small yellowish-tan spot at the small end.
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Joe Boggs
Boxwood Leafminer Major boggs.47 Tue, 04/25/2017 - 18:47
I first raised the alarm on boxwood leafminers (Monarthropalpus flavus) in a BYGL Alert posted in late March (see "Blistered Boxwoods and Hissing Hedges", March 30, 2017). That report focused on alerting landscape managers that high localized populations were producing heavy leafmining symptoms that could be mistaken for winter injury.
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Joe Boggs
Wilting Buckeyes boggs.47 Wed, 04/19/2017 - 18:17
Wilting buckeyes may sound like an Ann Arbor dream, but I'm not talking about our beloved Silver Bullets. I'm referring to the symptoms caused by the Buckeye Petiole Borer (Proteoteras aesculana) on its namesake host.
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Joe Boggs
Calico Scale is Puffing-Up and Pumping Honeydew boggs.47 Wed, 04/19/2017 - 16:43
Overwintered calico scale (Eulecanium cerasorum) females are now "puffing-up" and pumping out impressive quantities of clear, sugary honeydew in southwest Ohio. The appearance of the globular, helmet-shaped females coupled with complaints of trees oozing sticky goo makes this life-stage important for detecting new infestations. All other life-stages are much less obvious.
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Joe Boggs