Articles

Crabapples in China chatfield.1 Wed, 04/26/2017 - 06:14

  One of the more pleasant e-mails I have received in recent memory was from my friend and colleague Dr. Ling Guo of the Beijing Botanic Gardens. It read: “Jim, would you please come to Beijing for Crabapple Conference in April 14-19 for one hour talk. All expenses paid.  Hmm, let’s see. Yes!  Fortunately, for my talkative nature it turned out to be a bit more than that one hour talk, not including the translations, but what a deal. 

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Authors
Jim Chatfield
Erik Draper

First Generation Pine Needle Scale Crawlers are Afoot.

First generation Pine Needle Scale (Chionaspis pinifoliae) crawlers (1st instar nymphs) are now appearing on conifers in southwest Ohio. This is a type of "armored" scale so-named because of the hard, waxy cover (test) that protects the females. The egg-shaped pine needle scale tests are snow white with a small yellowish-tan spot at the small end.
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Joe Boggs

Boxwood Leafminer Major

I first raised the alarm on boxwood leafminers (Monarthropalpus flavus) in a BYGL Alert posted in late March (see "Blistered Boxwoods and Hissing Hedges", March 30, 2017). That report focused on alerting landscape managers that high localized populations were producing heavy leafmining symptoms that could be mistaken for winter injury.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Crabapples In Crablandia Are A Dazzling Display!

The crabapple plot, called Crablandia in Secrest Arboretum, is located in Wooster, Ohio and will be in full bloom and full splendor, in the next couple of days.  With the onset of multiple periods of unseasonably warm weather, the typical bloom emergence time is about 2 weeks ahead of schedule.  The incredible display of crabapple flowers has traditionally been one of the most popular times to stroll through the Arboretum and experience the amazing fragrance, accompanied by marvelous views of flower petals.

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Authors
Erik Draper

Rusty Junipers

Junipers in southwest Ohio are being garnished with tangerine tentacles and orange goo; the calling cards of rust fungi. The three fungi producing the colorful displays belong to the genus Gymnosporangium and each must alternate between a member of the plant genus Juniperus and members of the rose family (Rosaceae) in order to complete their life cycle.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Wilting Buckeyes

Wilting buckeyes may sound like an Ann Arbor dream, but I'm not talking about our beloved Silver Bullets. I'm referring to the symptoms caused by the Buckeye Petiole Borer (Proteoteras aesculana) on its namesake host.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Calico Scale is Puffing-Up and Pumping Honeydew

Overwintered calico scale (Eulecanium cerasorum) females are now "puffing-up" and pumping out impressive quantities of clear, sugary honeydew in southwest Ohio. The appearance of the globular, helmet-shaped females coupled with complaints of trees oozing sticky goo makes this life-stage important for detecting new infestations. All other life-stages are much less obvious.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Sneaky Common Chickweed is Going to Seed

Common Chickweed (Stellaria media) is a European winter annual that is now found world-wide. Winter annuals are sneaky weeds. They produce seeds in the spring then plants fade away prior to the summer season; out of sight, out of mind. The seeds dodge spring applied preemergent herbicide bullets because they do not germinate until the fall. The resulting plants grow below our radar throughout the fall, winter, and early spring when we pay little attention to what's going on in our lawns and landscapes.
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Authors
Joe Boggs

Focus on Poison Hemlock Control

Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum) is one of the deadliest plants in North America. This non-native invasive was imported as an ornamental in the late 1800s from Europe, West Asia, and North Africa. The plant contains highly toxic piperidine alkaloid compounds, including coniine and gamma-coniceine, which cause respiratory failure and death in mammals.
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Authors
Joe Boggs