Articles

Flower Celebration

  A lovely tradition of celebrating diversity (Oslava Květin) was started by Norbert Čapek, a Czech Unitarian, in 1923, with flowers as symbols of the universality of nature and ecumenical love. Start your own flower celebration in your home, for every business meeting, with your customers, sharing the beauty of flowers – especially this time of year: this “lusty month of May” (from Camelot). Everyone bring a flower! Here are a few floral fineries from my home and neighbors.

  The cover image for this bygl-...

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Jim Chatfield
Hydrangea Leaftier Oddball Damage boggs.47 Tue, 05/02/2017 - 16:45
I first came across the odd looking handiwork of Hydrangea Leaftier Moth (Family Tortricidae; Olethreutes ferriferana) caterpillars several years ago on its native namesake host in Clifton Gorge in Greene County, OH. Since that time, I've commonly found this leaftier on wild and cultivated hydrangeas at other locations.
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Joe Boggs
Holey Oak Leaves! boggs.47 Tue, 05/02/2017 - 16:32
Look closely at developing oak leaves for Spiny Oak Sawfly (Periclista albicollis) larvae. The small, light-green, semi-transparent larvae have shiny black head capsules and are covered with rows of forked (bifurcated) spines. Their small size coupled with their coloration allows these larvae to easily blend with their leaf-food background.
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Joe Boggs
Please Report Early-Bird Periodical Cicadas boggs.47 Mon, 05/01/2017 - 10:12
Periodical Cicadas (Magicicada spp.) take either 17 or 13 years to complete their development and emerge from the soil en masse as different "broods" in the spring. The only periodical cicada brood that's forecast to emerge this year is Brood VI. However, there is a prediction that we will see an "early emergence" of some members of Brood X this spring even though adults of this brood are not expected to emerge full-force until 2021.
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Joe Boggs
Badaling, Badaling: The Great Wall of China chatfield.1 Sat, 04/29/2017 - 11:23

A trip to China often includes a visit to The Great Wall of China, to some part of the 5500 to 13,000 mile collection of fortifications (depending on whether various branches are included).   So, I set out for the Great Wall with my guide Nina during my trip to the Beijing Botanic Gardens for their Crabapple Conference. Nina gassed up a Hyundai and we headed 50 miles northwest and over a half mile in elevation to Badaling (八达岭), the most visited section of the Wall and the first opened to tourists in 1957. From Nixon to Obama, to Nina and me.  

 

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Jim Chatfield
Is it Time to Plant Tomatoes? Check the Soil Temperature! crook.46 Fri, 04/28/2017 - 11:55
This time of year everyone is anxious to get out and begin planting their vegetable garden. You may have spent the last few months browsing the seed catalogs and dreaming about fresh tomatoes from your garden. Also you may have recently noticed vegetable transplants at your local retailers however this does not necessarily mean it is time to start planting.
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Julie Crook
Glenwood Gardens: A "Volcano" Mulch-Free Zone boggs.47 Thu, 04/27/2017 - 19:12
Most of my images are of bad things in landscapes. I use these teaching images to illustrate plant threats; sometimes those threats are from people. So-called "volcano mulch" or "mulch mounds" is a good example. That's why I was so thrilled yesterday when I found example after example of absolutely perfect tree mulching at Glenwood Gardens!
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Joe Boggs
Slugged Rose Leaves boggs.47 Thu, 04/27/2017 - 16:36
Roseslug sawflies were once generally considered only nuisance pests of roses in Ohio. The Common Roseslug Sawfly was most often encountered followed occasionally by the Curled Roseslug. The common roseslug has only one generation and the curled roseslug two generations. These sawflies would come and go so quickly they seldom caused appreciable damage.
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Joe Boggs
Corrugated River Birch Leaves boggs.47 Thu, 04/27/2017 - 14:37
The unusual leaf distortion damage caused by the spiny witchhazel gall aphid (Hamamelistes spinosus) is now appearing on river birch in southwest Ohio. The aphid produces raised ribs or "corrugations" on the upper leaf surface that match deep furrows between the veins on the lower leaf surface where the aphids live.
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Joe Boggs
Springtime in Ohio chatfield.1 Thu, 04/27/2017 - 08:56

  Woke up, got out of bed, dragged a comb across my head…Well, no, that is truly Fake News. Yet, upon returning from China to Springtime busting out all over in Ohio, I was mesmerized by the buzzing bees and budding birches; the blending of sweet birch catkins and flowering dogwood bracts above. Welcome to the Show! And right here in the Wayne County ChatScape.

 

  Up first, with a nod to China, is a golden-leaved ‘Ogon’ cultivar of dawnredwood, Metasequoia glyptostroboides.

 

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Jim Chatfield