Focus on Poison Hemlock Control

Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum) is one of the deadliest plants in North America. This non-native invasive was imported as an ornamental in the late 1800s from Europe, West Asia, and North Africa. The plant contains highly toxic piperidine alkaloid compounds, including coniine and gamma-coniceine, which cause respiratory failure and death in mammals.
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Joe Boggs

Tigers are Prowling Ohio Woodlands

My good friend Brad Bonham told me about a conversation she had with a landscaper over the weekend who declared they were seeing Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis) (EAB) beetles mating in a woodland in southwest Ohio. Of course, as she noted, it's way too early for EAB adults to be on the wing; full bloom of black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) is a good phenological indicator for EAB adult emergence.
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Joe Boggs

Not Too Early For Ticks: Dog Tick

It's never too early for tick awareness.

Today, at the Extension Office, a tick sample was brought in for identification.  It was an adult male dog tick, Dermacentor variabilis.  Ticks are blood-feeding parasites.  Three species are medically important in Ohio as a vector of several diseases affecting humans and pets to varying degrees.  The American Dog Tick, along with the deer tick (or black-legged tick) and the lone star tick.  Tick populations have been an increasing problem in Ohio.

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Ashley Kulhanek

Eastern Tent Caterpillar Update

Eastern Tent Caterpillars (ETC) (Malacosoma americanum) caterpillars are accomplished and prolific tent-makers producing highly visible silk nests in the forks of branches. The nests are now large enough to be easily seen in Greater Cincinnati. However, at this point in the season, it appears that populations are highly localized and not widespread.
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Joe Boggs

NW Ohio Anticipating Egg Hatch of Gypsy Moth

Conversations among family and friends this week could include dying, hiding and finding "eggs." It is Easter you know. 

 

The eggs that we are talking about in this BYGL Alert are those of the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar).  After spending about nine months in the egg mass stage, warmer temperatures are triggering the hatch of the caterpillars in Ohio.  These tan almost felt-like in appearance masses that can be laid anywhere will soon be bursting with 1st instar caterpillars. 

While we are eagerly awaiting the first hatch in NW Ohio,...

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Amy Stone

Spring Lawn Seeding

 

This Turf-Tip was provided Joe Rimelspach and Todd Hicks with OSU – Plant Pathology and Turfgrass Program.

 

Of the four seasons, this is the “third best time” to seed a lawn. The best is autumn, then winter, followed by spring and the least desirable time is summer. The main challenge with the spring seeding is the large number of weeds (both grassy weeds and broadleaf weeds) that can come up with the grass seed. Seed as early as possible in the spring so new plant can develop a root system before summer heat and dry conditions...

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Amy Stone

Product or Active Ingredient - Could There Be Confusion?

 

Earlier this week, Pamela Sherratt, Turfgrass Specialist in the Department of Horticulture and Crop Science at The Ohio State University alerted Extension to the potential of some questions coming into the Extension offices about a product, Roundup for Lawns from clientele across the state.    

 

A walk through the aisles of the pest management area of a garden center this spring may cause some consumers to take a second look. While Roundup has been around for a long time, Roundup for Lawns is a new product that has recently hit the shelves. The same name and...

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Amy Stone

Sawfly Leafminers Fly

I found Elm Leafminer Sawfly (Fenusa ulmi) adults flying around their namesake host yesterday in southwest Ohio. The emergence of this leafmining sawfly was predicted in my part of the state by accumulated GDD (219) and phenological indicators such as the full bloom of common chokecherry. This also means there is little doubt that Birch Leafminer Sawfly (F. pusilla) and Hawthorn Leafminer Sawfly (Profenusa canadensis) adults are on the wing.
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Joe Boggs