Leaf-Footed Bugs

Leaf-footed bugs (family Coreidae) are rife with discrepancies.  They are collectively so-named because of the leaf-like expansions of their hind tibia, not their "feet" which are called tarsi (tarsus singular) and are the leg segments they actually walk on. 
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Joe Boggs

Milkweed Bugs are Rampant

As common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) produces its signature spiny, oblong seed pods, milkweed bugs may show-up en mass to take advantage of the seed bounty. There are two species of bugs that feed on milkweed seed: the large milkweed bug (Oncopeltus fasciatus) and the small milkweed bug (Lygaeus kalmii).
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Joe Boggs

Annual of the Week - Coleus

Coleus (Solenostemon scutellaroides) is a versatile foliage plant that is prized for it's brightly colored, boldly patterned leaves in shades of red, orange, yellow, green, pink, purple, and white.  Adding coleus to your landscape makes an excellent color accent in garden beds and borders. It can also be planted in containers, window boxes, and hanging baskets.
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Julie Crook

PERRENIAL OF THE WEEK: Purple passionflower (Passiflora incarnata)

Purple passionflower goes by several common names including true passionflower, wild passionflower, and wild passion vine as well as maypop and wild apricot which refer to the fruit.  This fast growing native perennial climbing/trailing vine sports two key features that should entice Ohio gardeners and landscape designers:  it produces beautifully complex eye-catching flowers that are 2 - 3" wide and it produces edible fruit.

 

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Joe Boggs

The Heart of Trees: Jaume Plensa at Toledo Museum of Art

If you find yourself in Toledo, Ohio before November 6, 2016, I recommend a visit to the Toledo Museum of Art to enjoy the Jaume Plensa: Human Landscape Exhibit.  Seven large outdoor sculptures, plus an indoor installation that includes a stainless steel curtain through which visitors can walk, will be on view through early November. 
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Amy Stone

Oak Wilt in NW Ohio

 

This summer, there have been several phone calls to the Extension office in Lucas County from concerned residents describing red oak trees declining quickly.  Many described their tree(s) exhibiting symptoms that one could suspect that oak wilt (Ceratocystis fagacearum) might be the cause.  The symptoms described included:  flagging of branches in the tree's canopy; withering of leaves that turn brown and ultimately drop before normal seasonal leaf drop; and rapid decline of the overall canopy - some describe it as happening "overnight".  Additionally,...

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Amy Stone
Nancy J. Taylor
NEW WOODLAND STEWARDS NEWSLETTER AVAILABLE ONLINE stone.91 Mon, 08/29/2016 - 21:13

The Ohio Woodland Stewards newsletter, Ohio Woodlands, Water and Wildlife, is produced three times a year.  It provides subcribers with updates on the latest issues related to woodland management, including insect and disease or invasive plant issues.  Articles are also geared towards expanding a readers knowledge base on a wide variety of topics related to our Ohio woodlands and the management and care of them.  Subscribers can access the newsletter online at any time.  When new issues are released it is available in either hard copy or electronic - just let us know which version...

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Amy Stone

Oak Itch Mites Attack!

Folks in Northeastern Ohio complain of itchy welts on their heads, neck and upper torso. The oak itch mite, Pyemotes herfsi, has been identified as the culprit.

The last time Ohio suffered an outbreak was in 2008 in the Cincinnati area. At that time, walkers, joggers and cyclists were complaining that when they followed trails that were overhung by oak trees, they would end up with itchy welts the following day. At that time, the oak itch mite had been recorded as being a periodic pest from Nebraska to Texas and eastward to Tennessee. The bites were most common in July and...

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Dave Shetlar

Clean Up Lace Bug Infestations now!

Lace bugs are persisting on many trees and shrubs! Consider controlling them to keep the adults from overwintering and repeating the damage next year!

I noticed several hawthorns this week that have been turned yellow by continual lace bug attack this summer. In fact, some trees are beginning to drop leaves. Upon looking closely, there were numerous adult lace bug still on the leaves. The undersurface of each leaf was coated with tar spots (the fecal spots produced by lace bugs), old egg shells and cast skins. Remember that the lace bug species that infest deciduous trees (i.e.,...

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Dave Shetlar

THE WEEKLY WEED: Canadian Horseweed (Conyza canadensis)

Canadian horseweed (Conyza canadensis, family Asteraceae) has become notorious in recent years for failing to respond to glyphosate (e.g. Roundup) in agricultural fields and landscapes.  This annual weed, which is also known as just horseweed, Canadian fleabane, coltstail, and marestail, has moved in recent years from being a plague in field crops to become a scourge in landscapes and nurseries.  Indeed, this native North America plant has become such a problem in Ohio it has been added to the state's noxious weeds list.

 

Challenges with managing this weed centers...

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Joe Boggs